Call for papers: Addressing misinformation to promote evidence-informed healthcare

  The pandemic has highlighted an increasingly important phenomenon of the past years: misinformation. This could range from the promotion of treatments supported by very low-quality evidence to claims of effectiveness of interventions that are either unsafe or proven ineffective. The role of opinion leaders, including healthcare professionals, politicians, academics and influencers, among others, seems […]

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Understanding Lung Cancer Screening

  Understanding screening is difficult. Responses to screen, or not to screen individuals, is often an emotional topic. This blog sets out evidence that might inform such screening decisions.   If I get something wrong, or there is something you’d like to discuss then email me, send a message via twitter – I’ll add or correct the post […]

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TVT: seventeen year follow up and the shrinking denominator effect

  The shrinking denominator enhances the effect size and misleads the reader into thinking the effect is better than it actually is. Carl Heneghan I am at the Ideal Conference, at a workshop talking about clinical trial reporting and recent surgical scandals.  I chose the 17 years follow-up of the Tension-free Vaginal Tape – often quoted – […]

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Should you treat resolved Atrial Fibrillation?

  Do patients with resolved AF have a higher risk of strokes, asks Jack O’Sullivan Patients with Atrial Fibrillation (AF) are five times more likely to have a stroke than patients without AF. AF can be reversed (sinus rhythm restored) via catheter ablation or cardioversion (either electrical or chemical). Patients can also spontaneously revert to sinus […]

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Overestimation of cardiovascular risk and what to do about it

  A New Zealand study sets new standards for predicting cardiovascular risk and questions the validity of pre-existing risk equations  Carl Heneghan Prevention of cardiovascular disease relies on identifying those most at risk. Most cohorts of patients were established many years ago with patients at higher risk. A recent prospective cohort study done in New Zealand representing primary care […]

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