Call for papers: Addressing misinformation to promote evidence-informed healthcare

 

The pandemic has highlighted an increasingly important phenomenon of the past years: misinformation. This could range from the promotion of treatments supported by very low-quality evidence to claims of effectiveness of interventions that are either unsafe or proven ineffective. The role of opinion leaders, including healthcare professionals, politicians, academics and influencers, among others, seems to be more important than the pillars of EBM: evidence, expertise and values.

We drafted these five overarching questions that describe the scope of this call for papers:

  • What is the impact of misinformation, fake news and their counter-movements (including fact-checking) for teaching and practising EBM?
  • In the context of retractions, infoxication and research waste, what are the challenges and opportunities for the timely production and dissemination of high-quality evidence to support decisions in healthcare?
  • What is the best guidance for students, clinicians, patients and their carers and other stakeholders for identifying reliable sources of information and the best available evidence to answer their questions?
  • Which information literacy and critical appraisal skills are crucial to enable evidence-based practice and how can they be effectively reinforced during a health care emergency?
  • What is the role of point-of-care tools as reliable sources of information and how evidence-based are they?

We are looking for high-quality scholarly articles which can be produced de novo for this call or be part of a research line of a working group. We are looking for articles beyond the sole description of misinformation that analyse the causes, consequences and possible solutions to mitigate this problem.

We are accepting articles across the following article types:

  • Original Research and Evidence Synthesis
  • EBM Analysis
  • EBM Learning
  • Research Methods and Reporting

You can find out more about the submission criteria for these article types here. Articles should be submitted through our submission system. Please select ‘Misinformation’ under the drop-down selection ‘Special Issue Name’ as part of Step 1 of the submission process.

The closing date for submissions to be considered for this collection is Wednesday 10th November.

We are also commissioning a small number of discussion papers and editorials. We would invite interested parties to submit a pre-submission enquiry to editorial.ebm@bmj.com.

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