Is it better to be a thin smoker or a fat ex-smoker?

Weight gain when quitting smoking is a common concern, particularly amongst women. The increased attention of excess weight impacting on health suggests that some smokers may feel they are not achieving any net health benefits from quitting smoking if they gain weight once they stop smoking.

In this podcast I talk to Prof Siahpush about his paper examining if it is indeed better to be a thin smoker or a fat ex-smoker.

Mohammad Siahpush, PhD is a Professor in the Department of Health Promotion, Social & Behavioral Health at the University of Nebraska Medical Center, College of Public Health. He describes his research as being “about trying to understand what makes people behave the way they do. In looking for answers, I examine characteristics of individuals as well characteristics of the environments where people live.”

Read the full paper: It is better to be a fat ex-smoker than a thin smoker: findings from the 1997–2004 National Health Interview Survey−National Death Index linkage study goo.gl/OfH037

https://soundcloud.com/bmjpodcasts/is-it-better-to-be-a-thin-smoker-or-a-fat-ex-smoker

  • Fredrik Eich

    For a marginal difference of ~.02 on survival probability for all causes, I would definitely prefer to carry on enjoying smoking and look slimmer than ex-smokers. This (below) randomised cessation study found that hypertensive risk for ex-smokers increased independent of weight gain.

    http://hyper.ahajournals.org/content/37/2/194.full