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The PrEP ‘care continuum/cascade’: how would it look?

8 Mar, 17 | by Leslie Goode, Blogmaster

We take for granted the value of the care continuum (or ‘cascade’), now increasingly seen as the key measure of health system response to HIV (Cassell (STIs editorial)).   The application of this model to HIV has provided a benchmark for evaluation in contexts as diverse as Moscow (Wirtz & Beyrer (STIs)), South Africa (Schwartz & Baral (STIs)) or the Netherlands (van Veen & van der Sande (STIs)).   But could the same model also offer a means of evaluation in the case of other complex sexual health interventions such as PrEP (Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis)?

An on-line soon-to-be-published paper by Nunn & Chan (N&C), building on an earlier attempt by Kelley & Rosenberg (K&R), does precisely this.  An important difference from the earlier paper seems to be the more concrete definition of a larger number of steps (nine as against five) – especially in the central area of ‘uptake’ and engagement in care.  Here K&R define three stages: ‘need for awareness of PrEP and willingness to use it’, ‘need for good access to healthcare’, and ‘need for a prescription for PrEP.  N&C replace these with a more concrete conceptualization of the process in five stages involving: an occasion where PrEP access is facilitated (4); an appointment arising from that occasion where the assessment is performed (5); the prescription of PrEP, where indicated (6); the actual initiation of PrEP (i.e. when the client starts taking the pills) (7).  Also important is N&C’s substitution of two final steps – adherence (8)) then retention (9) for K&R’s single final step of ‘adherence’.  N&C point out that, whereas, with ART, ‘adherence’ is once-and-for-all and secures the ultimate goal of viral suppression, in the case of PrEP, we can envisage multiple trajectories depending on whether PrEP continues to be indicated (e.g. the client may no longer be exposed to risk).  Finally, K&R’s first step – ‘identifying at risk MSM’ – gives way to three: identifying at risk individuals (1), enhancing HIV awareness (2), enhancing PrEP awareness (3).

Is this nine-stage definition of a PrEP cascade overly “complex” (EECAAC2018)?

Answering such a question requires us to reflect on the function that the ‘cascade model’ is called upon to perform.  If the model divides up the total course of an intervention into a series of staged tasks, this is presumably because the health benefit depends on the completion of the whole intervention, yet the accomplishment of each step is necessary to the achievement of subsequent ones.  The idea of the cascade can provide a fair way of evaluating the progress of an intervention before its potential health benefits have been delivered – and can also identify the precise points at which the intervention is failing (i.e. where clients become ‘disengaged’).

It follows that each step should correspond to a potential outcome that is not inferable from previous or later outcomes but is worthy of independent evaluation.  If everyone who accesses PrEP (4) also attends an appointment at which suitability of PrEP is discussed (5), or everyone who adheres to PrEP (8) is also retained in PrEP (9), then steps (4) and (5), or steps (8) and (9), can be merged.  This is not stated in so many words by the authors of the model.  However, I would assume that it must lie at the basis of their thinking.

BASHH Centenary Vignette series: Culture of the gonococcus – some historical details

28 Feb, 17 | by flee

Culture of the gonococcus – some historical details

The 43 year period between two BJVD articles1, 2 incubated improvements in the diagnosis of gonorrhoea by laboratory culture. The following 47 gave birth to alternative tests (NAATs), more simple to administer, but whose automation brought loss of personnel and possibly skills: perhaps in microscopy, perhaps in laboratory culture.

In 1927 Colonel Harrison wrote1: “There are differences of opinion as to the value of cultures in the diagnosis of gonorrhoea. Personally I think them indispensable in the case of women and often valuable in male urethritis” (my emphasis).

Laboratory culture of Neisseria gonorrhoeae has always lacked 100% sensitivity. Sampling from multiple sites, on multiple occasions, was necessary to diagnose, to exclude, and, importantly, to monitor any advances, or fluctuations, in the efficiency of laboratory culture. The use of repeated tests to analyse the sensitivity of culture is now impossible, with the universal adoption of epidemiological treatment (before/without diagnosis).

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HIV prevention through HAART: a victim of its own success?

28 Feb, 17 | by Leslie Goode, Blogmaster

A recent study (Kalichman & Allen (K&A)) involving a series of four cross-sectional surveys (1996-2016) at a Gay Pride event in US Atlanta Georgia adds to the mounting body of evidence that substantial changes have occurred in community-held beliefs about the safety of certain sexual behaviours in the era of HIV treatment as prevention.

It might seem surprising, in view of the known effectiveness of ART as a preventative tool, that its deployment has generally failed to deliver the preventative benefits that might have been anticipated.  It is essential to achieve progress right along the ‘treatment cascade’, including, not only access to testing, but integration into treatment and viral suppression, for those benefits to be realized.  The fact remains that levels of infection amongst MSM, even in countries that have scaled up testing and treatment, have remained stable or are actually rising.

The obvious hypotheses, tested by K&A in this study, are that, 1., the perception of safety on the part of MSM has led to an increase in condomless anal sex, and that, 2., the growing incidence of STIs resulting from these sexual practices has itself had a direct impact in reducing the protective effects of ART.  (Of course, this is not to deny that sizeable proportion of the MSM community in the US – as in Australia (Mao & de Wit) – be successfully engaged in deliberate HIV risk-reduction strategies.)  The four surveys adopted identical measures and procedures, and involved ascertaining proportion of condom use during anal intercourse and number partners over the previous six months as well as assessment of beliefs regarding the preventive effectivess of ART (nine items of the questionnaire).

Results were as follows.  For HIV negative men: condomless anal sex (CAS) increased from 43% (1997) to 61% (2015); reporting two or more condomless sex partners from 9% to 33%.  For HIV positive men:  CAS from 25% to 67%; reporting two or more condomless sex partners from 9% to 57%.  As regards beliefs that ART was protective, comparisons across survey times indicate a main effect for year of survey, F(3, 1829) = 6.3,p<0.01, with an effect across survey year for men who engaged in CAS, F(1,1829) = 9.3,p<0.01.  Most evident from figures is a precipitous drop in perception of risk amongst both groups between the third and fourth survey (2006 and 2016).

K&A’s hypotheses (one or both) would seem to be corroborated from another quarter by the observed association with the introduction of HAART of an increased infection rate of gonorrhoea and syphilis (Stolte & Coutinho (STIs)) and of viral STIs (de Laar & Richel (STIs)).  Indeed rates of MSM syphilis increase coinciding with HAART introduction have been so dramatic in some places (e.g. Buenos Aires (Bissio & Cassetti (STIs)) as to lead to a hypothesis that HAART agents may actually be impairing immunity to the virus (Rekart & Cameron (STIs); Tuddenham & Ghanem (STIs)).  Whatever the validity of the latter hypothesis, evidence of STI epidemics is consistent with evidence of attitudinal and behavioural changes, such as those proposed by K&A.

BASHH Centenary Vignette series: Then and Now

28 Feb, 17 | by flee

Then and Now

As far as I know, Sir Humphry Davy Rolleston, Bart, GCVO, KCB, LLD, MD PRCP, has been the only President of the specialist society, the Medical Society for the Study of Venereal Diseases (MSSVD) to have also been the President of the Royal College of Physicians. He was the son of George Rolleston FRS FRCP, Linacre Professor of Physiology at Oxford and his wife Grace who was the niece of Sir Humphry Davy the chemist after whom he was named. He was a direct descendant of Sir Michael Stanhope, the Groom of the Stool of King Henry VIII and was 22nd in direct line from King Edward I. He was mainly associated with St George’s Hospital in London but became the Regius Professor of Physic at Cambridge. He was the Physician-in-Ordinary and Extraordinary to King George V. He served in the South African War and was Consulting Surgeon to the Royal Navy in the First World War with the rank of Surgeon Rear Admiral. He was the first baronet, the KCB decoration is usually awarded to senior military officers and civil servants, so presumably it was for services to the Navy and the GCVO for services to the Royal Family. The Journal was fortunate indeed to have such an eminent physician write the introduction to its first issue.

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What is the future of cervical screening in the era of HPV vaccination?

20 Feb, 17 | by Leslie Goode, Blogmaster

With the introduction of HPV child vaccination programmes, there will have to be a shift from cytology to HPV testing as the main technology involved in primary cervical screening, say the contributors to an on-coming special issue of Preventive Medicine (Tota & Ratnam I) (T&R). Why?  Well, first, because of the inevitable decline in the positive predictive value of the test (i.e. proportion of positive results that are true positives) that comes with declining prevalence of HPV sequelae.  This is an important consideration given the reality of the potential ‘harm’ resulting from false positive diagnoses.  But it is also necessary to take into account the impact on diagnosis (which, of course, in the case of cytology, takes place through the judgment of fallible human cytotechnologists) of the ever-dwindling proportion of abnormalities – an effect well described by T&R as a reduced ‘signal-to-noise ratio’.  This, our authors argue, will inevitably lead to ‘fatigue’.

Yet the transition to HPV primary screening is very much to be welcomed, it seems.  Tota & Ratnam I comprehensively review recent trials – in Canada, US and Europe – which all demonstrate that primary HPV screening (in combination with various ‘triage’ regimes for positive cases) offers more security, even at more distant testing intervals, than a cytology-based regime.  Also one that is less prone to human error, more cost-effective, as well as capable (unlike cytology) of being adapted to ‘self-testing’ regimes that could allow wider access (especially in limited resource settings).

Another paper in this on-coming special issue reviews trials (Canadian HPV FOCAL, and Montreal-based VASCAR) testing different ‘triage’ regimes (Tota & Ratnam II).  These involve cytology, with or without HPV genotyping.  Genotyping allows the discrimination of different levels of risk according to HPV genotype, giving health services the option of a differentiated approach to more or less ‘high risk’ strains (i.e. retesting after a year, referral to cytology, or to colposcopy). Whether or not genotyping is included in the regime, the combination of primary HPV screening in combination with triage seems to offer a much more reliable test than cytology – at the possible cost of some relatively minor increase in needless colposcopy referral.

Yet cervical screening policy must, in practice, be informed by more than epidemiological evidence – as the editor of this special issue (Schiffman) reminds us.  It will also depend on available resources and the willingness of a particular system to assume a degree of risk.  The US is particularly good example.  As Kinney & Huh show, in another study in this issue same special issue, the very marginal increment in safety demonstrated by five-yearly co-testing over stand-alone HPV is one that US appears not to be willing to relinquish, even at considerable cost both economic and in terms of ‘harms from screening’.

At the other extreme, of course, are the medium and limited-resource settings in which, for various reasons the aspiration to offer affordable protection through traditional forms of screening (e.g.  visual inspection with acetic acid (VIA)), may currently be delivering ‘sub-optimal’ results (see, for example, Sibanda & Cowan (STIs)).  (For an evaluation of HPV screening as against VIA, see Mitchell & Ogilvie (STIs).)  The special issue includes papers that consider the possibility of diverse screening algorithms in limited resource settings (Maza & Gage; Kuhn & Denny).  Where there are problems of access, the self-collection of samples, which becomes a possibility with HPV primary screening may offer a more feasible alternative to clinician based approaches.  Vallely & Caldor (STIs) makes the case for screening based on self-sampling using CepheidXpert.  Nelson & Arnold (STIs)  review 24 studies of HPV self-sampling across five continents.

A new kind of treatment for multi-resistant gonorrhoea?

31 Jan, 17 | by Leslie Goode, Blogmaster

Recent research at York University (Ward & Lynam (W&L)), UK, suggests the possible efficacity of carbon monoxide-releasing molecules as an antimicrobial against gonorrhoea.  The work is at an early stage – but the urgency of our current situation lends it a heightened interest.

Growing  resistance of Neisseria gonorrhoeae (Ng) to the last-defence antibiotic treatments (Lewis/STIs) – cephixime and ceftriaxone – has placed sexual health policy in a dilemma: to have an impact on the epidemic requires them to  focus treatment on core-groups; yet the treatment of these individuals has to be shown to heighten antibiotic resistance (Chan & Fisman/STIs).   Ison & Unemo/STIs survey the narrowing options, including heightened surveillance (see also Unemo & Khotenashvili/STIs) and the careful stewarding of our remaining antibiotic resources.  Others suggest recourse to less obvious measures, such as the comprehensive treatment of pharyngeal Ng in MSM (Lewis/STIs), or the use of topical antiseptics (Miari & Ison/STIs).  Ultimately, however, the answer will lie in the developments of new antibiotics.

So how about the York researchers’ carbon monoxide-releasing molecules (CORMs)?  Though – to repeat – it is early days, this avenue looks promising.  The agent, tryptophan manganese carbonyl (Trypto-CORM), has been shown by earlier studies to be toxic to Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus through the effect of CO molecules released by Trypto-CORM when irradiated.  W&L report that in the case of Ng, the bacterium appeared to be destroyed even by the very small amounts of CO released before irradiation.  The idea that Ng might be ‘exquisitely sensitive’ to CO would, of course, be good news.  It suggests the levels of CO necessary for efficacity against Ng might be sufficiently low to eliminate undesired toxic effects.  However, the results of W&L  also raise the suspicion that in the case of Ng, the cytotoxic effect might arise from some mechanism other than release of CO.  Fortunately, another innovation of the study appears to eliminate that possibility.  This is the use of extremely high CO affinity leg-haemoglobin (as opposed to the less high affinity deoxy-myoglobin) to ‘rescue’ the Ng culture by ‘scavenging’ the CO.  So it really does seem that the sensitivity of Ng to CO, not some other mechanism, is producing the cytotoxic effect.

A final potentially medically significant element of the study is the effect of culture age.  Cultures that had been stored for are longer time were more sensitive to Trypto-CORM – a finding that turns out not to be attributable to the number of viable cells in the inoculums.  The authors suggest the effect is due to the depletion in the number of active haem-copper oxidase complexes in near dormant cells.  This too could be good news.  Persistent bacteria in an infection that are recalcitrant to treatment are frequently slow-growing or dormant, and could be particularly susceptible to Trypto-CORM.

 

 

Susceptibility of heterosexual sub-Saharan women to HIV could be the result of cervicovaginal microbiome characteristics

30 Jan, 17 | by Leslie Goode, Blogmaster

Could part of the explanation for the apparent susceptibility of sub-Saharan African heterosexual women to HIV infection (eight-fold that of males) lie in the bacterial flora of their female genital tract (FGT)?

Studies published in STI journal have considered the relationship between a certain state of the FGT bacterial microbiome – especially the depletion of lactobacillus (Francis & Grosskurth/STIs) – and the susceptibility to BV (Antonio & Hillier/STIs; Hardy & Crucitti/STIs; Francis & Grosskurth/STIs; Haggerty & Ness/STIs), to pelvic inflammatory disease (Haggerty & Ness/STIs), and to other STIs (Francis & Grosskurth/STIs).  Others have observed the prevalence of Lactobacillus in the healthy FGT microbiome (Madhivanan & Krupp/STIs), and considered the impact on the FGT lining of practices of vaginal douching (Balkus & McClelland/STIs), hormonal contraception (Verwijs & Wijgert/STIs), and sexual debut (Jespers & Crucitti/STIs).

Highly relevant to all these discussions is a recently published study by Gosmann & Anahtar of a prospective cohort of 236 young HIV-negative women participating in the South African Ragon Institute’s FRESH study (Females Rising through Educations, Support and Health) in Kwa-Zulu Natal. The researchers were able to follow up their cohort for a total of 198.2 person-years, in the course of which 31 participants acquired HIV.  The researchers distinguish four ‘cervicotypes’ in respect to FGT bacterial flora; then determine their prevalence along with their association with ‘HIV target cells’ (i.e. activated CD4 T cells expressing the HIV co-receptor CCR5) and HIV acquisition.

The four cervicotypes correspond to the dominance of Lactobacillus crispatus and of Lactobacillus iners (CT1 and CT2, respectively), the preponderance of Gardnerella vaginalis (CT3), and a biome showing a far more diverse range of bacterial types (CT4).  Strikingly, the first two cervicotypes (CT1 and CT2) account for only 10% and 32% of women in the cohort; while, among white women in Western countries, the proportion showing Lactobacillus dominance would be c.90%.  The other 58% fall into the categories of high diversity communities with low Lactobacillus abundance (CT3 and CT4).  More interestingly still, none of the 31 HIV sero-conversions took place among the 10% of women with CT1-type bacterial flora.  Rather, sero-conversions were fairly evenly distributed among the other three cervicotypes, with some diminution of relative incidence in the CT2 category (i.e. nine sero-conversions, as opposed to 10 and 12 in CT3 and CT4 respectively).  Researchers observed a 17-fold increase in HIV target cells in women with a CT4-type cervico-vaginal microbiome as against those with CT1-type, and elevated levels of chemokines MIP-α and MIP-β which attract CCR5 expressing cells in women with diverse FGT bacterial communities.

Sadly, regimens aiming to restore Lactobacillus crispatus dominance (e.g. antibiotics or probiotic vaginal suppositories) show significant recurrence rates.  However, modifiable biological and behavioural factors may play a considerable role on Lactobacillus depletion in sub-Saharan African women (e.g. vaginal washing; antibiotic use; recent Trichomonas and HSV-2).  If so, then, as Baeten & McClelland/STIs point out, this would suggest the possibility of effective intervention strategies to reduce HIV transmission by improving vaginal health.

Location of HIV-2 emergence determined by distribution of indigenous cultural practices of male circumcision

16 Jan, 17 | by Leslie Goode, Blogmaster

Sousa & Vandamme demonstrate a robust correlation between HIV-2 prevalence at the time of the 1980s surveys and the absence of indigenous practices of male circumcision earlier in the century.  This is a complex and interdisciplinary study, involving some of the earliest large-scale, West African serological surveys of HIV-2 (1980s) and extensive ethnography of the region throughout the twentieth century.

HIV-2 seems to have crossed the species barrier into humans from a primate called the ‘sooty mangabey’.  The two epicentres of the 1980s HIV-2 epidemic – south-west Côte I’Ivoire and Guinea Bissau – correspond to the two points along the band of sooty mangabey territory where ethnic groups were to be found who did not practice circumcision (Côte I’Ivoire), or performed it only late in life or very intermittently (Guinea Bissau).  The complexity of this study arises from the fact that, thanks to waves of islamicization, male circumcision has been widely adopted across the region even in areas where it was traditionally prohibited.  Hence investigation of the correlation with HIV-2 emergence, probably in the 1940s, required the authors to go back to ethnographic accounts preceding islamicization.

Of course, the certainty of a causal link cannot be established.  But Sousa & Vandamme discover a strong negative correlation between male circumcision and HIV-2 (Spearman rho = -0.546).  Their results are supported by studies that establish the same negative relationship with HIV-1, both in sub-Saharan Africa (Moses and Plummer) and, more recently in Papua New Guinea (MacLaren & Vallely/STIs).  A likely causative mechanism might be the prevalence of ulcerative sexually transmitted infections (Weiss & Hayes/STIs).

So Sousa & Vandamme offer an additional ‘ecological’ reinforcement of the public health rationale for encouraging voluntary male medical circumcision (VMMC).  Yet what is also interesting, from a public health perspective, is the importance their study attributes to culture in the adoption of a practice like male circumcision.  In the present case, for once, the impact would appear to have been very positive from the medical point of view. The authors speak, for example, of islamicization, along with ethnic intermarriage in the cities, as having given rise to ‘social pressure to be circumcised in order to be accepted by women’, and the ‘abandonment of traditional prohibitions of male circumcision’. Of course, the impact of indigenous culture may often be less benign from a medical point of view – as the source of conservative attitudes that tend to hold back and limit the uptake of VMMC.  As, for example, where males have seen male circumcision as the practice of potentially hostile neighbouring groups (Cultural constraints on uptake of circumcision/STI/blogs), or as a practice uniquely suited to those younger age groups on whom it was traditionally performed (Mbabazi/STIs).  But, either way, it is noteworthy that the influence of local culture would often seem to be so decisive.  So there may be an argument, for electing to promote infant circumcision, as an evidently medical practice that runs less risk of falling foul of prevailing cultural attitudes that restrict ‘demand’ (Gray & Kigozi/STIs; Feasibility of infant circumcision/STIs/blogs).

 

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Revised UK NICE Guidelines for HIV testing: why local prevalence based targeting by GPs and hospitals makes sense

11 Jan, 17 | by Leslie Goode, Blogmaster

November 2016 saw the publication of revised UK NICE Guidelines for HIV testing (last updated 2011) – only a few weeks before the appearance of the annual Public Health England Report: HIV in the UK/2016.  The latter highlights the estimated level of still undiagnosed HIV in the UK (which, at 13,500/101,000, places us 3% short of the UNAIDS 90:90:90 target) and the proportion of late diagnoses (approx. two/five thousand).  It also draws attention to the ‘diversity’ of the epidemic, and the relatively poor levels of diagnosis amongst the 16,500 infected non-black African heterosexuals (approx. 1/4, as opposed to 1/7 for MSM or 1/8.5 for black African heterosexuals).

In the light of these findings, we can appreciate the move in the NICE Guidelines, regarding opportunistic testing in primary and secondary care, towards an approach that, first, makes absolutely clear its basis in regional prevalence rather than any other factor, and, second, is more specific – and more demanding – about the occasions when testing is recommended.  We find a new distinction of two levels of high local risk: high (0.2-0.5%) and extremely high (>0.5%).  This determines whether testing should be offered on specified occasions, namely, in primary care, at registration and the performance of any blood test, and, in secondary care, at admission and performance of a blood test (‘high’ prevalence areas); or whether there should be universal opportunistic testing (‘extremely high’ prevalence areas).  As compared with the 2011 guidelines, an insistence on local prevalence as the determining factor replaces the specification of multiple high-risk groups (e.g. MSM or black Africans).

The danger with routine HIV testing is well illustrated by a 2011 study of screening in 29 Paris emergency departments: Wilson d’Almeida & Cremieux/STIs/blogs.  This trial seems to have spectacularly failed to pick up any HIV infections that would not have been detected even without the intervention.  By contrast, what is proposed by the NICE Guidelines is routine testing in areas of extremely high prevalence.  Of course, patients may still refuse testing (Dhairyawan & Orking/STIs) – and appear to do so all the more frequently where they belong to groups, like non-African heterosexuals, that the authors of the 2016 guidelines are so anxious to include (Mohammed & Hughes/STIs).  Nevertheless, the 2014 HINTS study (HIv testing in Non-Traditional Settings) of the acceptability of routine HIV testing has demonstrated encouraging levels of uptake (c.65%) in UK Emergency Departments, Acute Care Units, Primary Care Centres, and dermatology outpatients (Rayment & Sullivan; see also Mohammed & Hughes/STIs).  Conversely, there is evidence, where primary care is concerned, that practitioners may be capable of missing opportunities for testing even where their patients present with indicator conditions for HIV infection (Agusti & Casabona/STIs).

Responding to the new NICE guidelines, a GPs’ representative stresses the existing workload of GPs and the sensitivity of sexual health issues, but broadly welcomes the new emphasis.

 

 

 

UNAIDS 2016 Report: How a ‘life-cycle’ approach can help the world ‘get on the fast track’ to HIV prevention

7 Dec, 16 | by Leslie Goode, Blogmaster

‘Get on the Fast Track: a Life-cycle Approach to HIV’ is the latest UNAIDS report, following on from the UN Assembly’s 2016 declaration of commitment to ‘Fast Track’ goals for ending the HIV/AIDS epidemic. The major theme of the ‘life-cycle’ appears to owe much to the findings of the South African CAPRISA study – above all, the idea of a transmission cycle between younger (25 year-old) women and older (>25 year-old) men.  Broadly, phylogenetic analysis reveals that the prevailing pattern of transmission is as follows.  Younger women appear to get infected through casual relationships with considerably older men, who have, in turn, been infected by their longer-term partners; in time, the younger women grow up and form longer-term relationships – and the cycle is repeated.  The former group – younger (≤25 year-old) women – appear to be more vulnerable to infection than men of the equivalent age due to complex social factors, and have recently seen only c. 6% declines in annual incidence; older (>25 year-old) men have incidence rates that have remained obstinately high despite all recent efforts to reduce them.  These are best explained by poor rates of testing, integration into treatment, and viral suppression making them a potential risk to non-HIV-infected partners.

Diagnosing a problem is one thing; framing the solution quite another.  In case of the younger women, the dominant factors appear to be structural and societal – e.g. gender inequalities.  These are difficult to address without major social and political change.  The authors suggest a number of prevention tools, including sexual education in schools, the introduction of pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP), and social transfers.  However, recent trials of PrEP in sub-Saharan Africa do not bode well for this intervention (STI/blogs/’Failed PrEP trial’; STI/blogs/‘Another failed PrEP trial’); while the evidence for the effectiveness of sexuality education and ‘social transfers’ is far from conclusive (School-based Sexuality Programmes/STI/blogs; STI/Galarraga & Sosa-Rubi; STI/Minnis & Padian; STI/Khan & Khan).  However, in the case of the other group – i.e. older men – the obstacles to HIV prevention (poor rates of testing and viral suppression) may be less intractable, and the report proposes a number of very practical measures that could help, including: distribution of self-test kits through female partners attending ante-natal clinics (STI/blogs/’Partner-delivered STI testing’); simplifying ART regimens so individuals have to take just one tablet a day; shifting from CD4 count testing to viral load testing.

The report also has much to say about other phases of the life-cycle, as well as about ‘key populations’ (estimated 45% of new infections).  Regarding the latter, the authors report the stability, or even rise, in new infections amongst sex-workers, drug-users and MSM. They emphasize the negative impact of criminalization of key populations and same-sex relations (73 countries) (see STI/blog/’HIV criminalization’/; STI/blog/’Health workers violate human rights’), the very low levels of domestic funding (on average, only 12% of total spending on MSM prevention), and the relatively young age of many in the ‘key populations’.  The authors recommend ‘comprehensive’ programmes for these populations incorporating access to a range of health care programmes, such as the Red Umbrella programme for sex workers in South African, and the ‘Targeted Strategy Plan’ for the transgender population in Lima, Peru.

 

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