Deborah Bowman on Shame, Stigma and Medicine

The current issue of Medical Humanities is guest-edited by Luna Dolezal and Barry Lyons and focuses on ‘Shame, Stigma and Medicine’. Deborah Bowman turns to drama to ask how theatre is well-placed to explore the impact of shame in the clinical setting in her paper, ‘Vulnerability, Survival and Shame in Nina Rainer’s Tiger Country.’ Drawn […]

Read More…

Silent Rage

Review of Wrath of Silence directed by Xin Yukun, China 2017 Screened at London Film Festival 2017, seeking UK distribution in 2018 Review by Professor Robert Abrams, Weill Cornell Medical College, New York Wrath of Silence, an ‘indie’ film from China tells a painful story.  It is filled with starkly incompatible ideas and images, juxtaposing […]

Read More…

Putting the ‘Heart and Soul’ Back into Medicine: The First ‘The Doctor as a Humanist’ Symposium

Authors: Veronika Makarova ( Sechenov University), Margaret Chisolm ( Johns Hopkins University), Annalisa Manca ( Queen’s Belfast), Irina Markovina ( Sechenov University), Jonathan McFarland ( Sechenov University) The first ‘The Doctor as a Humanist’ (DASH) symposium was held in Palma de Mallorca, Spain on the 13th-14th October 2017.The Symposium was the result of the cooperation […]

Read More…

Cinema, Memory and Wellbeing in Brazil

This blog post comes from Dr Lisa Shaw, Reader in Brazilian Studies at the University of Liverpool. She is author of Popular Cinema in Brazil (Manchester UP, 2004) and Brazilian National Cinema (Routledge, 2007), both with Stephanie Dennison, and The Social History of Brazilian Samba (Ashgate, 1999) and Carmen Miranda (BFI-Palgrave Macmillan). She appears in the BBC4 […]

Read More…

Can revalidation be a platform for praxis and the emancipation of the nursing profession?

By Catherine Kelsey, University of Bradford It is argued that nursing is controlled by a number of hegemonic influences including political reform and societal expectations, the constant call for evidence-based practice and the all-pervading management-led changes that seem to be a constant. And yet nurses are considered to be autonomous and accountable practitioners (Hilton, 2005), […]

Read More…