You don't need to be signed in to read BMJ Blogs, but you can register here to receive updates about other BMJ products and services via our site.

Journal Announcements

Congratulations to Film Correspondent Khalid Ali

1 Sep, 17 | by amcfarlane

It gives us great pleasure to offer our congratulations to our film and media correspondent, Dr Khalid Ali, who has been selected as a Film Fellow by the Global Health Film Initiative. It is an intense programme in filmmaking for doctors and involves working with a professional production company, and the CEO of the Global Health Film Initiative, and a trustee of Medical Aid Films, Gerri McHugh.

Only nine doctors from the UK were selected to be trained, and the outcome will be three short films which will premier in the Barbican as part of the Global Health Film Festival in December. Well done, Khalid!

New Editor for Medical Humanities

18 May, 17 | by amcfarlane

BMJ, a leading medical knowledge provider, is pleased to announce Brandy Schillace PhD as the new editor of Medical Humanities.

Dr Schillace is Senior Research Associate and Public Engagement Fellow for the Dittrick Museum of Medical History, College of Arts and Sciences, at Case Western Reserve University, US. For ten years, she managed the medical anthropology journal, Culture, Medicine, and Psychiatry, and edited its first medical humanities special issue. An accomplished medical humanities scholar, speaker and author, she continues to serve as chief editor of the medical humanities and review blog MedHum | DailyDose. Her recent books include the co-edited collection UNNATURAL REPRODUCTIONS, on “monstrous” birth across time and genre (Cambria), DEATH’S SUMMER COAT, exploring cultural approaches to death and dying (E&T UK, Pegasus US), and CLOCKWORK FUTURES, a social history of technology and the “steampunk” aesthetics of invention (Pegasus, US). In all her work, Dr Schillace seeks to uncover the human stories at the centre of science and medicine.

Dr Schillace will take over as editor from Deborah Bowman from 1 July 2017. Welcome to Dr Shillace and thank you to Professor Bowman for all of her excellent work on the journal.

New Blog Curator and Reviews Editor

14 Mar, 17 | by amcfarlane

I am Anna McFarlane, the new blog curator and reviews editor here at the BMJ Medical Humanities blog, and I wanted to introduce myself to regular readers – and first time visitors. I’m delighted to be taking on this post and would like to thank my predecessor, Columba Quigley, who has been answering all my questions and doing everything she can to make this transition as smooth as possible. Thank you also to editor-in-chief Deborah Bowman and everyone else on the editorial board for all your help so far.

My interest in the medical humanities has been growing exponentially over the last few years. While my thesis dealt with a relevant subject – the representation of psychological discourses in science fiction – it was my post as the research assistant on the Wellcome Trust-funded Science Fiction and the Medical Humanities project at the University of Glasgow that really urged me to develop a relationship with the field as a whole. As part of that project, myself and the principal investigator, Dr Gavin Miller, edited a special issue of BMJ Medical Humanities and took the opportunity to dive into a series of fascinating enquiries, covering speculative design, bioethics, and disability studies among many others. It is now my pleasure to take on a more permanent role working with the journal.

To that end, I’m looking forward to continuing and developing the work of this blog over the next few months, so please get in touch if you’d like to provide us with:

  • Book reviews: If you need a review copy, email me and I’ll see what I can do.
  • Guest blog posts: If you want to explore a relevant medical humanities topic in blog-form, perhaps one raised in the pages of the journal, let me know.
  • Other reviews and innovative interventions: reviews on exhibitions, television shows, and other media will be considered, as well as any novel ideas for developing conversations in the medical humanities that you might have.

You can get in touch with me to discuss any of these options, or just to chat about all things related to the medical humanities, on Twitter (@mariettarosetta), or by emailing me at anna.mcfarlane[at]glasgow.ac.uk. If you haven’t read the journal before, you can find the current issue here. I’m very much looking forward to working with all of you as we explore this developing field together.

Editor-in-Chief post at Medical Humanities

25 Jan, 17 | by cquigley

 

The Institute of Medical Ethics and BMJ are looking for the next Editor-in-Chief who can continue to shape Medical Humanities into a dynamic resource for a rapidly evolving field. Candidates should be active in the field, keen to facilitate international perspectives and maintain an awareness of trends and hot topics. The successful candidate will act as an ambassador for the journal supporting both pioneering authors and academics publishing their first papers. The candidate will also actively promote and strengthen the journal whilst upholding the highest ethical standards of professional practice. International and joint applications are welcomed.

Interviews will be held on 24th March 2017.

Term of office is 5 years; the role will take 12-15 hours a week.

Contact Kelly Horwood (khorwood@bmj.com) for more information and to apply with your CV and cover letter outlining your interest and your vision for future development of the journal.

Application deadline: 24th February 2017.

Start date: June 2017

Further information here.

Blog Curator and Books Editor Opportunity

18 Jan, 17 | by cquigley

Blog Curator and Books Editor Opportunity

 

We have a vacancy for a Blog Curator and Books Editor at Medical Humanities. It is a single, combined role as all book reviews are published on the Blog.

The role involves:

·         Commissioning and editing content, including reviews, for the Medical Humanities Blog;

·         Maintaining the Medical Humanities Blog and updating it regularly (currently on a weekly schedule, but this could be flexible within reason);

·         Liaising with publishers to receive new titles and organise reviews of relevant books for the Blog;

·         Contributing to the editorial team (comprising the editor-in-chief, associate editors and BMJ Publishing staff) that leads and manages both the journal and Blog, including attending the annual editorial team meeting;

·         Curating the content of the Blog to reflect the journal’s identity, priorities and interests;

·         Working with social media platforms to provide a coherent online presence for Medical Humanities

 

The role is flexible and can be adapted according to the successful applicant’s interests and availability. On average, the role takes approximately 4-6 hours per week. It is an exciting and creative opportunity to join a diverse and well-supported editorial team.

If you are interested in the role, you are welcome to contact the Editor-in-Chief, Prof. Deborah Bowman, for an informal and confidential discussion. Her email address is dbowman@sgul.ac.uk.

Applications, comprising a letter setting out a) the reasons for applying and b) suitability for the role and a curriculum vitae, should be submitted to Deborah Bowman at the above email address

“The Reading Room”: Book Editor Role at Medical Humanities

5 Feb, 14 | by Deborah Bowman

It is an exciting time for Medical Humanities and, as part of its evolution, the Book Section is changing and expanding. After the next issue, the Book Section will become “The Reading Room” and appear in both in the hard copy of the journal and on the Blog.

Claire Elliott, who has looked after the Book Section so well, has decided that it is time for her to step down. We are enormously grateful to her for her exceptional commitment and careful stewardship.

We are now seeking someone to take on the role of Editor of The Reading Room and to join us on the Editorial Team. We are open-minded about who might best suit this role, but we are seeking someone who has an overview of the discipline, an enthusiasm for reading (both academic and non-academic works) and an eye for the innovative. The Editor of The Reading Room will contribute both editorially and creatively. He or she will work closely with the Editor-in-Chief, Associate Editors, Film and Blog Editors to produce a Journal and Blog that are original, thought-provoking and engaging. Unfortunately, the remuneration for the role is limited to a nominal honorarium and reasonable expenses. However, it is a role that, we believe, has much to offer any curious bibliophile.

If you would like to be considered for the role, please send:

  • A cover email introducing yourself.
  • A brief statement (no more than 200 words) explaining why you would like to be the Editor of The Reading Room and what you would hope to contribute.
  • A short CV (no more than two pages of A4).

Please send your application to Professor Deborah Bowman (mheditor@bmj.com) by Monday 17th February 2014.

If you have any queries or would like to discuss the role informally before submitting an application, you are welcome to contact Deborah at the same email address.

In memory of Dr Sue Eckstein, Editor-in-Chief of Medical Humanities

2 Dec, 13 | by BMJ

It is with much sadness that we report the death of Dr Sue Eckstein, the Editor-in-Chief of the journal Medical Humanities. Sue Eckstein was an outstanding appointment. Her commitment to, and expertise in, the health humanities meant that she was the perfect person to lead the journal and we were delighted when she agreed to become Editor. In the all-too-brief time that she held the position, Sue approached her work with characteristic creativity, dedication and enthusiasm.

Sue was thoughtful and generous with all those with whom she worked. She inspired the teams with which she worked on Medical Humanities and gave meaning to the term ‘collaborative’ in her approach to working with others. The response from authors, reviewers and Editorial colleagues to the news of Sue’s death has revealed the depth of respect and affection felt by so many people for Sue.

The next issue of the journal will be dedicated to Sue.

Striving to better, oft we mar what’s well (King Lear, Act 1, Scene 4) >>

Feel yourself slipping down that slippery moral slope? Then take our online poll!

26 Jun, 11 | by Deborah Kirklin

The Editor’s Choice for the June issue of Medical Humanities is an original article by medical student Jason Leiboqwitz entitled “Moral erosion: how can medical professionals safeguard against the slippery slope?” Following his participation in a Fellowship at Auschwitz for the Study of Professional Ethics program, Jason concludes that physicians are as vulnerable to corruption of their guiding principles today as they have ever been, and he poses an important question, asking what, if anything, they can do to stop themselves sliding down their own morally eroded slippery slope.

http://mh.bmj.com/

Do read his article. Its free to download. And then please take part in our online poll about any slippery slopes of your own. As always we’d love to hear you thoughts.

Join in our online poll on how individual patient stories have affected the way you practice medicine

4 Jul, 10 | by Deborah Kirklin

New this month to the Medical Humanities website is a series of online polls. The polls will appear once a month and provide an opportunity for you to share with others your experiences and thoughts about the interaction between clinical practice and medical humanities. As well as being asked to answer a simple yes/ no question, you’ll also have the chance to leave a comment and to read comments left by others. The first poll gets straight to the heart of medical humanities by asking whether individual patient stories have affected the way you practice medicine. more…

Medical humanities blog homepage

Medical Humanities

An international peer review journal for health professionals and researchers in medical humanities. Visit site



Creative Comms logo

Latest from Medical Humanities

Latest from Medical Humanities