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journal announcement

New Editor for Medical Humanities

18 May, 17 | by amcfarlane

BMJ, a leading medical knowledge provider, is pleased to announce Brandy Schillace PhD as the new editor of Medical Humanities.

Dr Schillace is Senior Research Associate and Public Engagement Fellow for the Dittrick Museum of Medical History, College of Arts and Sciences, at Case Western Reserve University, US. For ten years, she managed the medical anthropology journal, Culture, Medicine, and Psychiatry, and edited its first medical humanities special issue. An accomplished medical humanities scholar, speaker and author, she continues to serve as chief editor of the medical humanities and review blog MedHum | DailyDose. Her recent books include the co-edited collection UNNATURAL REPRODUCTIONS, on “monstrous” birth across time and genre (Cambria), DEATH’S SUMMER COAT, exploring cultural approaches to death and dying (E&T UK, Pegasus US), and CLOCKWORK FUTURES, a social history of technology and the “steampunk” aesthetics of invention (Pegasus, US). In all her work, Dr Schillace seeks to uncover the human stories at the centre of science and medicine.

Dr Schillace will take over as editor from Deborah Bowman from 1 July 2017. Welcome to Dr Shillace and thank you to Professor Bowman for all of her excellent work on the journal.

New Blog Curator and Reviews Editor

14 Mar, 17 | by amcfarlane

I am Anna McFarlane, the new blog curator and reviews editor here at the BMJ Medical Humanities blog, and I wanted to introduce myself to regular readers – and first time visitors. I’m delighted to be taking on this post and would like to thank my predecessor, Columba Quigley, who has been answering all my questions and doing everything she can to make this transition as smooth as possible. Thank you also to editor-in-chief Deborah Bowman and everyone else on the editorial board for all your help so far.

My interest in the medical humanities has been growing exponentially over the last few years. While my thesis dealt with a relevant subject – the representation of psychological discourses in science fiction – it was my post as the research assistant on the Wellcome Trust-funded Science Fiction and the Medical Humanities project at the University of Glasgow that really urged me to develop a relationship with the field as a whole. As part of that project, myself and the principal investigator, Dr Gavin Miller, edited a special issue of BMJ Medical Humanities and took the opportunity to dive into a series of fascinating enquiries, covering speculative design, bioethics, and disability studies among many others. It is now my pleasure to take on a more permanent role working with the journal.

To that end, I’m looking forward to continuing and developing the work of this blog over the next few months, so please get in touch if you’d like to provide us with:

  • Book reviews: If you need a review copy, email me and I’ll see what I can do.
  • Guest blog posts: If you want to explore a relevant medical humanities topic in blog-form, perhaps one raised in the pages of the journal, let me know.
  • Other reviews and innovative interventions: reviews on exhibitions, television shows, and other media will be considered, as well as any novel ideas for developing conversations in the medical humanities that you might have.

You can get in touch with me to discuss any of these options, or just to chat about all things related to the medical humanities, on Twitter (@mariettarosetta), or by emailing me at anna.mcfarlane[at]glasgow.ac.uk. If you haven’t read the journal before, you can find the current issue here. I’m very much looking forward to working with all of you as we explore this developing field together.

Call for Papers – special issue of the Journal of Bioethical Inquiry

4 Nov, 15 | by cquigley

 

The editors of a forthcoming (2017) special issue of the Journal of Bioethical Inquiry on “Investigating public trust in expert knowledge: ethics, narrative and engagement” are currently inviting submission of papers.

The special issue will be the first of its kind to examine the ethics of public trust in expert knowledge systems in emergent and complex global societies. Through an interdisciplinary approach, it will draw from contributions in bioethics, the social sciences and the medical humanities.

Guest Editors: Silvia Camporesi (King’s College London), Mark Davis (Monash University), Maria Vaccarella (University of Bristol)

Trust pervades personal, social and political life. Basic trust is seen as the foundation of self, trust figures in the everyday reciprocity of social relations, and governmentality is imbued with questions of trust and distrust. Trust in expert knowledge (i.e. willingness to believe, endorse and enact expert advice) has emerged as a problem for governments seeking to engage and influence publics on matters as wide-ranging as public policy on the environment and economic development, biopolitics, and wellbeing over the life course. The knowledge systems which support climate change policy have been criticized and even refuted, leading to public policy challenges for action on climate. The uptake of vaccines in populations appears to be eroding and scientific/ethical controversies have marked the field. The emerging ‘superbugs’ crisis requires that publics engage with the idea that antimicrobials are no longer available to the extent they once were. Biotechnological interventions in reproductive life and health are subject to changed expectations for expert and consumer rights and responsibilities. The recent explosion of the CRISPR genome editing debate has brought with it socio-technical expectations (e.g. CRISPR technologies as a panacea for a world rid of diseases from birth, and some say even of ageing), together with fears of eugenics and a return to the discourse of designer babies, which now seem a possibility. Public life is marked also by the questions of trust, knowledge and ethics implicated in end-of-life decision making, related controversy over physician-assisted suicide and other questions of life’s limits. Against this backdrop of troubled trust, expert knowledge and changing bio/ thanopolitics, how can governments engage publics? How do public communications take effect? How do experts and publics narrate trust? What are the ethical ramifications of efforts to garner, sustain or regain public trust? As some have argued, are we already post-trust and therefore in alternative modes of public engagement with the idea of collective life?

Topics

Contributions are solicited from the above disciplines that look at the role of narratives in the construction and deconstruction of public trust in expert knowledge and at ethical or unethical ways of engaging with the publics on a variety of topics, including but not limited to:

  • sustainability and climate change
  • public policy and economic development
  • vaccination and other biotechnologies
  • emerging infectious diseases, including superbugs
  • reproductive health
  • provider-consumer relations in health care and beyond
  • genetics, including genome editing technologies (e.g. CRISPR/Cas9)
  • race
  • end-of-life decision making

Methodologies:

We seek contributions that apply narrative approaches to bioethics, sociology, and medical humanities.

The special issue will consist of 8-10 contributions that employ a variety of methodological approaches for a recommended length of 7,000-7,500 words each.

Instructions for authors for submission to JBI can be found here:

http://bioethicalinquiry.com/wp-content/uploads/JBI_IFA.pdf

Abstract Submission and Timeline

Extended abstract of 750 words should be submitted to Dr Silvia Camporesi by January 25, 2016. Please clearly state in your abstract the methodology you are employing in your paper, and how your contribution addresses the topic of the special issue ‘‘Investigating public trust in expert knowledge: ethics, narrative and engagement’.

A decision on the abstract will be notified by Feb 15, 2016.

Full papers are expected by May 1, 2016.

Reviewed papers will be returned to authors by August 1, 2016.

Revised papers are expected by October 1, 2016.

The special issue is expected to appear in print in June 2017.

For inquiries contact Dr Silvia Camporesi: silvia.1.camporesi@kcl.ac.uk

 

In memory of Dr Sue Eckstein, Editor-in-Chief of Medical Humanities

2 Dec, 13 | by BMJ

It is with much sadness that we report the death of Dr Sue Eckstein, the Editor-in-Chief of the journal Medical Humanities. Sue Eckstein was an outstanding appointment. Her commitment to, and expertise in, the health humanities meant that she was the perfect person to lead the journal and we were delighted when she agreed to become Editor. In the all-too-brief time that she held the position, Sue approached her work with characteristic creativity, dedication and enthusiasm.

Sue was thoughtful and generous with all those with whom she worked. She inspired the teams with which she worked on Medical Humanities and gave meaning to the term ‘collaborative’ in her approach to working with others. The response from authors, reviewers and Editorial colleagues to the news of Sue’s death has revealed the depth of respect and affection felt by so many people for Sue.

The next issue of the journal will be dedicated to Sue.

Striving to better, oft we mar what’s well (King Lear, Act 1, Scene 4) >>

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