The Anthropology of Emory and Ebola: Emory Healthcare Thinks Outside of its “Concrete Box” by Laura Jones

    Two days after Halloween, I met with Dr. Bill Bornstein, Chief Medical Officer and Chief Quality Officer at Emory Healthcare.  I am a cultural anthropologist who has been conducting field work at Emory University Hospital (EUH) for three years, and Dr. Bornstein and I meet monthly to discuss hospital culture, specifically that of […]

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Guest Essay: “A mind diseased”: Examining the evolution of madness using Shakespeare’s Macbeth by Sarah Ahmed

  INTRODUCTION Over the years, our understanding of what it means to be mad has evolved. Ancient civilisations held the belief that madness was as a result of spiritual possession; the Enlightenment’s concept of rationality remade madness into an external manifestation of internal grief; in the last century we have started to develop biological theories […]

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The Artist in Theatre: On the Primacy of the Subjective Narrative by Jac Saorsa

Drawing Women’s Cancer explores the lived experience of gynaecological illness through a unique interrelation between art and medical science. Based in Cardiff and supported by Cardiff University and Cardiff and Vale University Health Board, the project began in 2012 as a collaboration between myself and Amanda Tristram, gynaecological surgeon. Since then it has produced two […]

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Dr Ahmed Rashid: “Diseases of the heart: Where theology meets cardiology”

Associations between religion and health have been debated for many years. This interest has been paralleled in the medical literature and has led to the inclusion of religious, cultural and sociological topics into medical school curricula, encouraging future clinicians to adopt a more holistic approach to understanding patients and their behaviours. Much of the research […]

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Ayesha Ahmad: Hearing Voices; Illusions and delusions as God enters the doctor-patient dialogue

As medicine evolves, or rather reveals, nuances that speak of an inherent interdisciplinary nature, how are we to recognise and become accustomed with voices other than the language of textbooks; the sounds of monitors and machines; and the neutral tone of the doctor to patient dialogue? What happens when the patient hears God? […]

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Ayesha Ahmad: ‘Medicine and Metaphors; Writing from the heart’

Since the time of Hippocrates, an ancient Greek physician, who is regarded as the “Father of Medicine,” medicine and the humanities have been interwined with all human beings in all cultures through a shared and common desire to heal. Sometimes though, the very fatality and mortality that gives rise to our existential meanings; our ethereal […]

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