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CFPs and Conference Reports

PCMD Medical Humanities Conference 2016

18 Apr, 16 | by cquigley

 

Ian Fussell

Community Sub Dean UEMS

 

In 2002, The Peninsula Medical School (now Peninsular College of Medicine and Dentistry (PCMD)) became the first UK medical school to integrate the medical humanities as core curriculum.

Every year since, year four students engage in a six-month project alongside and mentored by an artist. The culmination of the project is a conference organised by the students displaying and presenting their work.

The work thus created has become increasingly sophisticated over the years, as evidenced by the 2016 conference that just took place in Truro (April 2016). In fact, it was probably the highest quality of work seen to date and would not be out of place at any international medical humanities conference.

The morning session was opened by Professor Alan Bleakly, the current President of the Association for Medical Humanities and a leading world expert in the field. This was a particularly poignant conference as 2016 is the final year that it will be run under the auspices of PCMD following the disaggregation of Exeter and Plymouth Medical Schools. It may have been this, or the unsettled future that the current students are facing, that gave this year’s presentations an extra edge.

Following a superb talk by Alan that encouraged a political voice, we were treated to three songs written and performed by “Dull to Percussion”, a band formed in the “Medical School of Rock” module. The songs were indeed political, satirising the split between the universities and included a protest song aimed squarely at our Health Secretary. Search iTunes or Spotify to listen for yourself, and watch “A Song for a Hunt” go viral.

The day was then jam-packed and it was impossible to experience all that was on offer. The range of skill and talent was breathtaking. We were lectured on the human cost of the western desire for sweetness by students from the anthropology module, and invited to debate “Do Christians make better doctors” by the Christian ethics students. This year a number of new Special Study Units (SSUs) were run. They were also extremely good and included a collaboration with Truro’s Hall for Cornwall team.

The students worked at the theatre, but more impressively wrote a play on mental health in medical students. We were treated to a premiere performance – “Permission to be Human” should be performed at every medical school in the country. There was also a monologue by a shy mature student who helped us understand alcoholism and PTSD in war veterans. The mood was lifted by a hilarious stand up routine; how can dislocating your shoulder be so funny?!

There were a number of writing modules, including poetry. The audience was encouraged to write poems in a short workshop. Another new module was “Writing the Knife”, which generated superb short reflections on memorable clinical incidents. One piece called “Quayside” was outstanding and deservedly won a prize. Read it here https://memorablemedicmoments.wordpress.com/author/memorablemedicmoments/ and add your comments.

There was so much more to the students’ work, and this short piece cannot cover everything. However, I do want to mention a some other excellent pieces: working with clay exploring the professional masks doctors wear; pottery boxes representing the mess that doctors get into as they progress through their careers; moving and uncomfortable films that depicted a child’s journey through a hospital; the doctors strike shown as a frightening political movement; dopamine photography; a project on how we smell; and life drawing in conjunction with Falmouth Art School. At the end of the day we were “kettled” into a small room, and forced to party…

The aim of this SSU is to develop student’s tolerance to ambiguity. But the SSU achieves much more than this: it helps students develop a community of practice; it also fosters development of resilience and peer support; and importantly, the students have fun while exploring other perspectives on life and illness. I am extremely proud of our medical students and feel very privileged to work with them in this way. I hope that both Exeter and Plymouth continue with medical humanities in their developing curricula.

 

 

 

The Reading Room: Short-list for the 2016 Hippocrates Prize for Poetry and Medicine

22 Mar, 16 | by cquigley

 

Fragility of the human form: short-list for the 2016 Hippocrates Prize for Poetry and Medicine

 

The Hippocrates Initiative for Poetry and Medicine – winner of the 2011 Times Higher Education Award for Innovation and Excellence in the Arts – is an interdisciplinary venture that investigates the synergy between medicine, the arts and health.

Poets from New York and the UK are among the finalists for this year’s prize. Short-listed in the Open Category are Owen Lewis, child psychiatrist and poet from New York, and from the UK poets Anne Ryland from Berwick-on-Tweed and Jane McLaughlin from London.

Competing for the UK NHS 2016 Hippocrates first prize are paediatric cardiologist Denise Bundred from Camberley, former consultant haematologist Karen Patricia Schofield from Crewe and GP Chris Woods from Bury.

Find out more about the shortlisted poets.

The judges also agreed 16 commendations in the NHS category, and 17 commendations in the Open International category from Australia, France, England, Ireland, Scotland, New Zealand and the USA.

Find out more about the commended poets.

The winners will be announced at an awards ceremony in London on Friday April 15, 2016.

Check out the Medical Humanities poetry section here.

 

 

Encountering Pain: hearing, seeing, speaking – Call for Abstracts

15 Mar, 16 | by cquigley

 

Encountering Pain: hearing, seeing, speaking

 

A free two-day live event and international conference at UCL

Friday 1st and Saturday 2nd July 2016

Pain is not only expressed linguistically but through bodily movements, emotional reactions, and artistic expressions.

How do we respond when we encounter the pain of another? What happens when our own bodies encounter pain?  What tools do we possess when attempting to communicate pain and are there forms other than language for expressing it?

During these two days, we will explore a range of international and interdisciplinary approaches that can help us better understand encounters with pain both within and beyond the clinic. This event is aimed at those: living with pain, caring for someone in pain, treating or researching pain,  artists whose work touches on pain and others exploring alternative means of communicating and assessing pain.

The event will divert radically from the traditional academic conference format to encourage exchange between different groups affected by pain.

Call for Abstracts

Deadline 18th March 2016

Abstracts are invited from individuals or groups responding to the general theme of communicating and/or encountering pain. These may be conventional conference presentations and posters, visual arts or interactive sessions.

While particularly encouraging papers reporting research findings we also welcome those exploring innovative practices at the interface of the humanities, art and medicine.

Papers are invited (but not limited to) the following themes:

  • pain encounters within any healthcare context
  • pain encounters within alternative settings
  • pain encounters within a range of cultural contexts (for example explorations of how different cultures and people in different times attempt to make sense of human and animal suffering)
  • current and historical visualisations of pain
  • the value of the arts to democratizing medicine and breaking down existing hierarchies
  • assessing pain by non-conventional methods
  • alternative ways of recording and reporting pain narratives
  • the implications of patient pain narratives for other areas of medicine such as psychiatry and neurology
  • neural mechanisms for pain
  • pain as emotion
  • pain as identity
  • the meaning of pain and its lived experience, in the past and present

Please send a submission of no more than one page of A4, which you are free to use in any way you wish. Guidelines for submissions can be found under the Conference Deadlines tab, however for scientific abstracts (only) please follow the conventional format: Title, Background, Aims, Method, Results, and Conclusion. Conflict of Interest: Authors must declare any financial support received or any conflict of interests on their abstract.

Abstracts must be no longer than one A4 page, font no smaller than 11 pt.

Please send to encountering-pain@ucl.ac.uk by 18th March 2016.

Please include an email address.

Successful applicants will be notified by 18th April 2016.

https://www.ucl.ac.uk/encountering-pain/abstracts

For more information on the research projects that gave rise to this event, please see the links below.

www.ucl.ac.uk/slade/research/projects/pain-speaking-the-threshold

Ageing, Embodiment and the Self: A One-Day AHRC Symposium

13 Jan, 16 | by cquigley

Call for Papers – special issue of the Journal of Bioethical Inquiry

4 Nov, 15 | by cquigley

 

The editors of a forthcoming (2017) special issue of the Journal of Bioethical Inquiry on “Investigating public trust in expert knowledge: ethics, narrative and engagement” are currently inviting submission of papers.

The special issue will be the first of its kind to examine the ethics of public trust in expert knowledge systems in emergent and complex global societies. Through an interdisciplinary approach, it will draw from contributions in bioethics, the social sciences and the medical humanities.

Guest Editors: Silvia Camporesi (King’s College London), Mark Davis (Monash University), Maria Vaccarella (University of Bristol)

Trust pervades personal, social and political life. Basic trust is seen as the foundation of self, trust figures in the everyday reciprocity of social relations, and governmentality is imbued with questions of trust and distrust. Trust in expert knowledge (i.e. willingness to believe, endorse and enact expert advice) has emerged as a problem for governments seeking to engage and influence publics on matters as wide-ranging as public policy on the environment and economic development, biopolitics, and wellbeing over the life course. The knowledge systems which support climate change policy have been criticized and even refuted, leading to public policy challenges for action on climate. The uptake of vaccines in populations appears to be eroding and scientific/ethical controversies have marked the field. The emerging ‘superbugs’ crisis requires that publics engage with the idea that antimicrobials are no longer available to the extent they once were. Biotechnological interventions in reproductive life and health are subject to changed expectations for expert and consumer rights and responsibilities. The recent explosion of the CRISPR genome editing debate has brought with it socio-technical expectations (e.g. CRISPR technologies as a panacea for a world rid of diseases from birth, and some say even of ageing), together with fears of eugenics and a return to the discourse of designer babies, which now seem a possibility. Public life is marked also by the questions of trust, knowledge and ethics implicated in end-of-life decision making, related controversy over physician-assisted suicide and other questions of life’s limits. Against this backdrop of troubled trust, expert knowledge and changing bio/ thanopolitics, how can governments engage publics? How do public communications take effect? How do experts and publics narrate trust? What are the ethical ramifications of efforts to garner, sustain or regain public trust? As some have argued, are we already post-trust and therefore in alternative modes of public engagement with the idea of collective life?

Topics

Contributions are solicited from the above disciplines that look at the role of narratives in the construction and deconstruction of public trust in expert knowledge and at ethical or unethical ways of engaging with the publics on a variety of topics, including but not limited to:

  • sustainability and climate change
  • public policy and economic development
  • vaccination and other biotechnologies
  • emerging infectious diseases, including superbugs
  • reproductive health
  • provider-consumer relations in health care and beyond
  • genetics, including genome editing technologies (e.g. CRISPR/Cas9)
  • race
  • end-of-life decision making

Methodologies:

We seek contributions that apply narrative approaches to bioethics, sociology, and medical humanities.

The special issue will consist of 8-10 contributions that employ a variety of methodological approaches for a recommended length of 7,000-7,500 words each.

Instructions for authors for submission to JBI can be found here:

http://bioethicalinquiry.com/wp-content/uploads/JBI_IFA.pdf

Abstract Submission and Timeline

Extended abstract of 750 words should be submitted to Dr Silvia Camporesi by January 25, 2016. Please clearly state in your abstract the methodology you are employing in your paper, and how your contribution addresses the topic of the special issue ‘‘Investigating public trust in expert knowledge: ethics, narrative and engagement’.

A decision on the abstract will be notified by Feb 15, 2016.

Full papers are expected by May 1, 2016.

Reviewed papers will be returned to authors by August 1, 2016.

Revised papers are expected by October 1, 2016.

The special issue is expected to appear in print in June 2017.

For inquiries contact Dr Silvia Camporesi: silvia.1.camporesi@kcl.ac.uk

 

The Reading Room: ePatients Conference, Queen’s University Belfast

12 Aug, 15 | by cquigley

 

ePatients

The Medical, Ethical and Legal Repercussions of Blogging and

Micro-Blogging Experiences of Illness and Disease

 

Institute for Collaborative Research in the Humanities

Queen’s University Belfast, 11-12 September 2015

The provisional programme for this conference is now available:

Friday 11th September

11.00 – 11.30         Registration

11.30 – 11.45          Welcome

11.45 – 12.45          Keynote 1:

                                      Anne-Marie Cunningham (Cardiff University)

                                    Learning with and from epatients

1.45 – 3.45               Panel 1:

                                      Chair: Nathan Emmerich (QUB)

Amy Brown (SUNY Upstate Medical University, Syracuse, New York): Grounding the Relationship Between Families and Physicians in a Digital Community: A Case Study

Columba Quigley (Reading Room Editor, Medical Humanities): The ePatient and Stories of Illness

Kristen Larson (Duke University): Autopathography and Online Community: Applying Biovalue to Understand the Lisa Adams Controversy

Yewande Okuleye (University of Leicester): You call it Marijuana and I call it Medical Cannabis: Online Identity Construction and Illness Narratives from the epatient/activist Perspective.

4.00 – 5.40              Panel 2:

                                       Chair: Pascal McKeown (QUB)

Maggie Bennett and Deborah Coleman (QUB): Cultivating Compassion through Analysis of Online Patient Narratives

Sylvia Hübel (Interfaculty Centre for Biomedical Ethics and Law, University of Leuven, Belgium): IVF Blogs and Online Forums as Sites of Patient Empowerment and Moral Agency

Angela Kennedy (independent researcher): Power and Conflict between Doctors and Patients: the Case of the ME Community

5.45                            Drinks Reception, The Naughton Gallery

7.00                           Conference Dinner, Deanes at Queen’s

Saturday 12th September

 10.15 – 11.45          Panel 3:

                                      Chair: Paul Murphy (QUB)

Rebecca J. Hogue (University of Ottawa, Canada): Cancer Blogging – A Survivor’s Story

Marie Ennis-O’Connor (Digital Media Strategist and Health Blogger): Connecting and Protecting: The Benefits and Pitfalls of Online Disclosure

Anne Lawlor (22q11 Ireland Support Group): Social Media as a Virtual Lifeline: A Support-Group Perspective of the Issues

12.00 – 1.00             Keynote 2:

                                     Julia Kennedy (Falmouth University)

                                     In Our Blood: Mapping Multiple Narrative Accounts of Leukaemia Online

 1.45 – 3.15               Panel 4:

Victoria Betton (University of Leeds and mHealthHabitat programme director (NHS)): Mental Health Discourses in Social Networking Sites

Ida Milne (QUB): A Rash of Reaction: the e-parent and the 2015 Measles Epidemics

Sally Burch (Patient Blogger at “Just ME”): The Use of Patient Blogs as a Care Resource

 

The deadline for registration is August 14, 2015.

Further information can be found here: https://epatientsconference.wordpress.com/2015/06/24/programme-and-registration/

Science Fiction & Medical Humanities: Special Issue CfP

4 Jul, 15 | by Deborah Bowman

Call for Papers for Medical Humanities

Science Fiction and the Medical Humanities

We are delighted to announce that Medical Humanities will be publishing a special issue: ‘Science Fiction and the Medical Humanities’. This edition of the journal will be guest edited by Dr Gavin Miller.

Themes

We invite papers of broad interest to an international readership of medical humanities scholars and practising clinicians on the topic ‘Science Fiction and the Medical Humanities’.

Science fiction is a fertile ground for the imagining of biomedical advances. Technologies such as cloning, prosthetics, and rejuvenation are frequently encountered in science-fiction stories. Science fiction also offers alternative ideals of health and wellbeing, and imagines new forms of disease and suffering. The special issue seeks papers that explore issues of health, illness, and medicine in science-fiction narratives within a variety of media (written word, graphic novel, theatre, dance, film and television, etc.).

We are also particularly interested in articles that explore the biomedical ‘technoscientific imaginary’: the culturally-embedded imagining of futures enabled by technoscientific innovation. We especially welcome papers that explore science-fiction tropes, motifs, and narratives within medical and health-related discourses, practices, and institutions. The question – how does the biomedical technoscientific imaginary permeate the everyday and expert worlds of modern medicine and healthcare? – may be a useful prompt for potential authors.

Subject areas might include but are not limited to:

• clinicians as science-fiction writers
• representations of medicine, health, disability, and illness in science-fiction literature, cinema, and other media
• the use and misuse of science fiction in public engagement with biomedical science and technology
• utopian narratives of miraculous biomedical progress (and their counter-narratives)
• socio-political critique in medical science fiction (via cognitive estrangement, critical utopias, etc.)
• science fiction as stimulus to biomedical research and technology (e.g. science-fiction prototyping)
• science-fiction tropes, motifs and narratives in medical publicity, research announcements, promotional material, etc.
• the visual and material aesthetic of science fiction in medicine and healthcare settings

Publication

Up to 10 articles will be published in Medical Humanities in 2016.

All articles will be blind peer-reviewed according to the journal’s editorial policies. Final publication decisions will rest with the Editor-in-Chief, Professor Deborah Bowman.

Important Dates

Please submit your article no later than 1 March 2016

Submission Instructions

Articles for Medical Humanities should be a maximum of 5,000 words, and submitted via the journal’s website. Please choose the special issue ‘Science Fiction and the Medical Humanities’ during the submission process.

If you would like to discuss any aspect of your submission, including possible topics, or the possibility of presenting your work under the auspices of the Wellcome Trust funded project ‘Science Fiction and the Medical Humanities’, please contact the Guest Editor in the first instance:  Dr Gavin Miller (gavin.miller@glasgow.ac.uk)

Medicine Unboxed: Students 2015 – An Invitation to Participate

24 Mar, 15 | by Deborah Bowman

Medicine Unboxed: Students 2015 – Call for Participation

 

Medicine Unboxed aims to inspire debate and cultural change in healthcare. Medicine today exists at a time of extraordinary scientific knowledge and therapeutic possibility but faces challenging moral, political and social questions. Medicine Unboxed engages the general public and healthcare audiences with a view of medicine that points to human experience, ethical reflection and political debate alongside scientific achievement. We believe the arts can illuminate this perspective, inspire conversation on the values implicit to good medicine and foster a sense of awe and wonder. Our annual events – Unboxed (2009), Stories (2010), Values (2011), Belief (2012), Voice (2013) and Frontiers (2014) – attract audiences of over 300 people, and draw writers, politicians, philosophers, musicians, performers, theologians and artists into dialogue with clinicians and patients. These events are theatrical, moving and challenging. Our event this year, on 21-22 November in Cheltenham, explores Mortality.

 

Now in its third year, the Medicine Unboxed: Students event brings students of the arts, health and medicine together to share, explore and converse, drawing on the unique perspective and experience of being a student or in the early stages of a profession. Medicine Unboxed: Students 2015 takes place on the afternoon of Friday 20th November and we are seeking proposals for participation in this event and to be interns for Mortality.

 

Medicine Unboxed thrives on diversity and inclusivity. We are particularly keen to welcome students (undergraduate or postgraduate) from all backgrounds, including (but not limited to) art, drama, music, medicine, literary studies, philosophy and allied health subjects. You can submit a proposal in one of four broad categories:

 

  1. Provocations and Debates– proposals are likely to focus on a contested aspect of health, illness and its treatment and/or to explicitly engage with multiple points of view;
  2. Exhibitions and Performance– submissions in this category are likely to be creative e.g. poetry readings, monologues, excerpts from plays, creative writing, musical performances, stand-up comedy, art exhibits, short films etc.
  3. Workshops and Interaction– proposals may include experiential activities such as drawing, creative writing, singing and voice activities, improvisation etc or an interactive approach to a question or concept.
  4. Conversations– submissions in this category are likely to take the form of short papers or prompt material presented to, and discussed with, the audience.

 

Proposals may be from individuals or groups. They should be no longer than 500 words and include the i) title, ii) format, iii) names and affiliations of the people involved and iv) a summary of the contribution proposed. You should also indicate in which category you would like your proposal to be considered.

 

Please email your proposal by 6 July 2015 to Dr. Sam Guglani (sam@medicineunboxed.org). All proposals will be reviewed by the advisory group for Medicine Unboxed: Students and decisions will be communicated by 20 July 2015. 8 winning entries will be selected to present at Medicine Unboxed: Students (20th November 2015) and to act as interns for Mortality (21-22 November 2015) with travel and accommodation for the weekend included as part of the award.

 

 

Follow:             @medicineunboxed and @MUstudents

Explore:           http://mustudents.wordpress.com/ and http://medicineunboxed.org

Join:                 https://www.facebook.com/groups/175072369272118/?fref=ts

Mail list:          https://www.facebook.com/medicineunboxed/app_100265896690345

 

 

ePatients: The Medical, Ethical and Legal Repercussions of Blogging and Micro-Blogging Experiences of Illness and Disease – Call for Papers and Conference Details

22 Mar, 15 | by Deborah Bowman

Queen’s University Belfast, 11-12 September 2015 Call for Papers

Referring to the growth of online patient-initiated resources, including medical blogs, the BMJ noted in a 2004 editorial that we were witnessing ‘the most important technocultural medical revolution of the past century’. Ten years later, the controversy caused by Bill Keller’s opinion piece in the New York Times (‘Heroic Measures’, January 2014) and a blogpost on the Guardian US website criticising Lisa Bonchek Adams’s decision to tweet her experience of breast cancer, remind us of the ongoing sensitivities surrounding online patient narratives and the complex relationship between the world of medicine and social media. Emma Keller, the freelance journalist (and wife of Bill Keller) who questioned Adams’s use of twitter to discuss terminal illness, wrote the following: ‘Should there be boundaries in this kind of experience? Is there such a thing as TMI? Are her tweets a grim equivalent of deathbed selfies? Why am I so obsessed?’ Adams, in emails to the Guardian, said that the column was ‘callous’ in its treatment of her and noted that the blogpost was riddled with inaccuracies and quoted a private direct message without permission.

As debates on the ethics, dynamics and even legal repercussions of online patient narratives become more prevalent, an international, interdisciplinary conference at Queen’s University Belfast, hosted by the Health Humanities Project Research Group at the Institute for Collaborative Research in the Humanities, will focus on how those with life-threatening or incurable illness use social media, as well as the medical, ethical and potential legal consequences of online accounts of pain, suffering and the clinical experience. We welcome paper proposals dealing with ePatient accounts from a variety of countries and cultures which address the following questions:

  •   What does the rise in social media (“web 2.0”) participation by patients tell us about the ways in which the growing influence of e-patients is challenging the power structures of traditional healthcare and, as a result, proving contentious?
  •   In what ways might social media narratives of illness be seen as a useful source of information for medics? What, conversely, are their limitations?
  •   How do patients influence their online followers, and vice-versa?
  •   What are the ethical issues involved in documenting ‘the public deathbed’?
  •   What are the potential legal consequences of publicly chronicling the clinical experience?

250-word proposals for 20-minute papers (or three-paper panels), in English, should be sent to Dr Steven Wilson by email attachment at the following address: steven.wilson@qub.ac.uk. The deadline for receipt of proposals is Friday 3 April 2015.

CFP: Postgraduate Medical Humanities Conference 2015 (University of Exeter, 20-21 July 2015)

11 Nov, 14 | by Deborah Bowman

CFP: Postgraduate Medical Humanities Conference 2015
University of Exeter, 20-21 July 2015
Confirmed Keynote Speakers:
Professor Stuart Murray, University of Leeds
Dr Roberta Bivins, University of Warwick
Building on the success of last year’s Postgraduate Medical Humanities Conference, this conference aims to bring together researchers from a variety of disciplines in a manner that reflects the broad scope of exciting research being carried out in the field of the medical humanities at present. We therefore welcome abstracts on any aspect of the medical humanities from postgraduates working in all disciplines, including but not restricted to English Literature, History, Film, Classics, and Art History. We also strongly encourage proposals from students training in a medical discipline (including trainee doctors, carers, psychiatrists, and other practitioners) who are interested in the medical humanities.
While this call is open to papers on all topics within the wide medical humanities remit, we would specifically like proposals on themes of contemporary importance within the field, such as the development of medicine and/or the medical humanities in India and China; representations of medicine in graphic novels; and ageing.
The conference will provide a forum for postgraduate scholars to exchange ideas and share their research in a friendly and engaging environment. The event will also allow delegates to discuss their work with senior academics in the field, including keynote speakers and other members of the Exeter Centre for Medical History.
The event will close with a roundtable discussion, featuring our keynote speakers and other esteemed members of the Centre for Medical History. This session will draw together the themes arising from the conference and reflect on future directions of research in the medical humanities.
There will also be a workshop led by Ryan Sweet and Betsy Lewis-Holmes (co-organisers of the forthcoming event Exewhirr) on public engagement.
We invite applicants to submit abstracts of up to 300 words (for 20-minute previously unpublished papers) to pgmedhums@exeter.ac.uk by Friday 19 December 2014 with “PGMH 2015 Conference Abstract” written in the subject line of the email. We also welcome panel and workshop proposals. Such proposals should include 300-word abstracts for up to four speakers in addition to a 500-word overview that explains the aims and rationale for the session.
We hope to be able to offer a small number of travel bursaries, which will be announced closer to the event.

Ryan Sweet

PhD Candidate

University of Exeter

eProfile: http://www.eprofile.ex.ac.uk/ryansweet/Academia.eduexeter.academia.edu/RyanSweet

Twitter: @RyanCSweet

 

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