You don't need to be signed in to read BMJ Blogs, but you can register here to receive updates about other BMJ products and services via our site.

art

Reflections on Art, Voicelessness, and the Patient Experience

14 Feb, 17 | by cquigley

 

Emma Barnard MA (RCA)

‘Silence is not Golden’

 

‘For those who live neither with religious consolations about death nor with a sense of death (or of anything else) as natural, death is the obscene mystery, the ultimate, affront, the thing that cannot be controlled. It can only be denied’.

Susan Sontag

 

One time, a healthcare professional completely removed the artwork (that I’d made with patients) from the Patients As People exhibition stating that it depicted death. This puzzled me. I couldn’t work out where the offence had come from; the closest reference to death was a thought bubble of the words “RIP” that a patient had drawn over their portrait. That particular patient’s condition was actually relatively minor and not serious; surely the thought bubble merely reflected something we all think about when we are sitting in a hospital waiting room? Where better to contemplate one’s own mortality? GP Dr Jonathon Tomlinson says, ‘Doctors are tortured by the idea that death represents a failure of medicine and this is worsened by a punitive shame and blame culture and highlighted by mortality league tables.’ Medicine has a great deal to offer, and prolonging life is not the only item on the agenda. To paraphrase William Osler, ‘What’s important is not simply what is the matter with the patient but what matters to the patient’.

How do you respond though when someone asks you if they’re going to die?

As artist in residence within an ENT (Head and Neck) clinical department, I have been collaborating with surgeons to explore the patient experience through art. Part of the work I do involves discussing with patients their experiences immediately after the medical consultation, where they reveal what lies behind the mask that they present to the doctor. Very often, patients are at that point trying to come to terms with their diagnoses. On one occasion, when speaking to a patient who had received a diagnosis of laryngeal cancer, to my amazement they seemed unconcerned that treatment might involve removal of their larynx; their major concern was that ‘didn’t want to die’.

As someone whose work as an artist is dependent on being able to communicate both verbally and visually, I am particularly intrigued by a person’s loss of voice and how that might alter his or her life. People not only have to come to terms with having their larynx removed, using a feeding tube and learning to swallow, but they also become voiceless in the conventional sense, having to relearn how to communicate. As laryngeal cancer survivor Kay Baker states, ‘I felt as if my personality had been taken away from me because I could not express myself anymore’.

It is not the words spoken by the voice that are of importance, but what it tells us of the speaker. Its tone comes to be more important than what it tells. “Speak, in order that I may see you,” said Socrates. (1)

(Reik, 1956, p.136)

The voice is one of the most important means by which we communicate. In the words of Alice Lagaay, an academic philosopher from Bremen University:

 ‘A voice is both individual and communal: On the one hand, every human voice is unique, no two voices are ever quite the same. In this sense every voice is the signature of an individual’. (2)

 

 

Portrait photographs (which contain their drawings) of people who attend the Talking Heads group held at St Josephs’ Hospice which supports people who have had experience with laryngeal cancer.

 

The building was warm, friendly and welcoming. But in fairly familiar community-type surroundings, the sounds that I heard were not. I had been invited to present my work on patient experience to the group ‘Talking Heads,’ a support group for people who have dealt with laryngeal cancer; more often than not they are without a regular ‘voice’. Denise Redmond, having worked as a Macmillan nurse for some time facilitating the support group for laryngectomy patients, reflected: ‘If you removed the gearbox in a car then the car would have no useful function and be scrapped. Patients with laryngectomies really humble me in their ability to overcome not only a cancer diagnosis but to survive and live beyond their cancer treatment with a significant impact of treatment.  There is always a trade off with cancer treatment especially when the aim is to cure somebody. Removing the organ that lets the patient communicate, speak, sing, breathe and eat and drink which are normal basic functions to sustain life is debilitating holistically. It is a life-changing event’. 

‘That’s great, it looks lovely and clear now’, said the surgeon. Physically, everything looked good and how much easier it would be if illness was just about an individual’s physicality. That’s not the case, of course, the mental scars remain, exacerbated by lack of understanding from family, friends, and others, too often scared of the change in you as you speak in a way that they do not understand. Denise: ‘There are many misconceptions about “neck breathers” and they can be very isolated. I know doctors and nurses who are afraid to look after patients that have laryngectomies as they perceive the laryngectomy as difficult and complex when the patients themselves are masters of their own care’. 

Mike Papesch FRACS, an ENT Head and Neck consultant surgeon explains his viewpoint: ‘From a surgical point of view, it is very clinical…with the end goal being survival and with recognised significant social, psychological and personal impact. It is impact that may be underestimated by the patient, but it is not underestimated by the medical team looking after them. And indeed, the doctor understands the difficult choices that patients have in undergoing these treatments. Perhaps it is that the patient, in reality, has no choice as to the treatment and its impact, if they do not wish to die of the disease. The reality they face truly is this harsh. And the patient will never fully understand what it means to have head and neck surgery, until after the process. This process can take place over several months. People do make some recovery, but never return to their pre illness performance status. I would not wish this surgery on anyone, but if they needed it, I would embrace it, advise it, and undertake it willingly, knowing full well it was done as a lifesaving, albeit life changing, intervention’.

Illness isn’t something you wave goodbye to in the consultation room after your appointment or in the theatre after a surgical operation. It follows you home, it is with you while you sleep and haunts you in your waking moments. In the words of Susan Sontag ‘Illness is the night-side of life, a more onerous citizenship. Everyone who is born holds dual citizenship, in the kingdom of the well and in the kingdom of the sick’. Days, weeks, years, and it is still there, refusing to let go. Unlike other cancers, which to a certain degree, are invisible, this one remains in full view for all to see and because there seems to be so little knowledge on the after effects, responding to someone who has had this disease can be uncomfortable for the onlooker.

 

Of the legacy that is laryngeal cancer, two years on Kay Baker writes:

No airway

No smell

Not much taste

Eating and drinking very slow

Have to be very careful in the bath – cannot get water down my stoma

Never go swimming (would drown)

More difficult to breathe especially in very hot, cold and windy weather

My life is so different now and there have been times when I have had bad thoughts – why this cancer, why me? Not wanting to live.

 

What I don’t like is people thinking there is not a PROBLEM.

No escape – there is a constant reminder every minute of the day – as soon as I wake up, unlike other cancers.

There is no hiding place.

Silence is not GOLDEN as the song goes!

 

‘Silence remains inescapably a form of speech’. Susan Sontag

 

References

1 Reik, T. (1946) The Ritual: Psychoanalytic Studies, Bryan, D. (trans). New York: International University Press.

2 Lagaay A 2008 Between Sound and Silence: Voice in the History of Psychoanalysis Freie Universität BerlinVolume 1 (1), ISSN 1756-8226

Quotes from: http://research.ncl.ac.uk/e-pisteme/issues/issue01/contents/e-pisteme%20Vol.%201(1)%20-%20Alice%20Lagaay%20(Full%20Text).pdf

Emma Barnard MA (RCA)

Bio

Emma Barnard is a visual artist, specialising in lens-based media and sound installations. Her work deals with social commentary, seeking to highlight contemporary issues and encourage debate surrounding them. The experience Emma has gained through several years of working with consultant surgeons and their patients from various disciplines, including ENT and Psychodermatology, is now influencing the field of medical education. Her “Patient as Paper” project (co-founded with Mr Mike Papesch FRACS, ENT consultant surgeon) artwork is currently being exhibited widely in galleries, universities and hospitals in England and internationally. It has been presented at several conferences within the medical and medical humanities fields, and most recently at University College London, Medical School and in a series of presentations at Surrey University for the Department of Health Sciences. At King’s Medical School in London Emma has led a highly successful pilot project to introduce art into medical education, undertaken in conjunction with a critical care consultant and a fourth-year medical student. An exhibition of this work is planned for later this year.

@PatientAsPaper

Exhibitions:

‘Patients As People’ (work created alongside patients) – currently installed within the Department of Health Sciences, Surrey University, Guildford

More information:

https://www.facebook.com/PatientAsPaper/?ref=aymt_homepage_panel

‘A Stitch in Time’ series of works to be shown at The Lawson Practice, London at the invitation of GP Jonathon Tomlinson during February/March.

Artist page – BerlinBlue Art: http://www.berlinblueart.com/emma-barnard

 

 

Book Review: This Way Madness Lies.

1 Feb, 17 | by cquigley

 

This Way Madness Lies. Madness and Beyond. By Mike Jay. London: Thames and Hudson, 2016.

Reviewed by Dr Allan Beveridge

 

Published to accompany the recent Wellcome Collection Exhibition, ‘Bedlam: the asylum and beyond’, this book is packed with over 600 photographs and illustrations drawn from the archives of institutions in Europe and America, as well as with art work by patients from a wide range of different eras and locations. The book is, itself, an ‘object’ and deserving of close study. At first sight, it seems a marvellous exhibit. Crammed with images from a bewildering variety of sources, it entices the viewer and, perhaps intentionally, disorients them with the clash of visual material. There are countless black and white photographs of asylum inmates, architectural plans of institutions, portrayals of psychiatric treatments such as the strait-jacket, lobotomy and malarial therapy, magazine advertisements for medication, cinema posters of asylum horror movies, anti-psychiatry placards, and a selection of art by well-known artists such as Hieronymus Bosch and Theodore Gericault, as well as celebrated patient-artists like Richard Dadd, Louis Wain and Adolf Wolfli. The organisers of the project have been able to mine a very rich seam of archival material and, possibly, they have been loath to exclude any of it from the book. The result is that while there are numerous large colour reproductions, there are also too many pages where multiple images have been crammed onto the one page. For example, page 16 has fifteen small black and white images of scenes from the story of Bethlem Hospital. The pictures are simply too minute and poorly defined to be properly viewed and appreciated. This is the fate of many other images which are bundled together onto the one page. This is frustrating because from what one can make out of the pictures, they are full of historical and aesthetic interest.

A more serious concern is that of the ethical questions raised by showing photographs and images of patients, often in distressed and degrading conditions. Should such images be shown? The men and women featured were not able to give consent. Should their only appearance on the historical record be that of their time as an asylum inmate with no reference to other aspects of their life such as, for example, being in a relationship, being a parent, or having an occupation? If the photographs are displayed, should the patients be identified by name or should they remain anonymous? Does anonymity serve to protect the identity of the patient or to make them even more of an ‘object’, lacking individuality?  Are some images too demeaning and disrespectful to the subject to be exhibited? These are difficult ethical questions which have provoked discussion amongst fine art commentators, historians and psychiatrists: they are no easy answers. Nowhere in the book is there a discussion of these vexed issues or even an acknowledgment that the presentation of this material may be problematic. Further, these images and photographs of patients were created for a variety of purposes. Some clinicians, such Sir Alexander Morison wanted to delineate what he saw as the particular ‘physiognomy’ of different types of mental conditions and paid professional artists to accompany him to asylums to make sketches of selected inmates. Charcot sought to capture the apparently spontaneous ‘hysterical’ behaviour of his patients at the Salpetriere, but research suggests patients adopted the poses expected of them. Other photographs of patients participating in the activities of the asylum were meant to advertise the benefits of the institution. Again, apart from the accompanying captions, there is little discussion of this or the particular context in which each image was commissioned.

One is reminded of the well-known episode in the history of Bethlem Hospital, or ‘Bedlam’ as it came to be known, where the general public were allowed to visit the asylum to view the inmates. Some saw it as educational, whilst others saw it as entertainment and a source of titillation. This practice was eventually stopped in 1770, but one is left with the uneasy feeling that this book in some ways represents a modern version of visiting Bedlam. At least the 18th century inmates were able to engage with the public and give an account of themselves. Here the patients, frozen in images and photographs – ‘mute inglorious’ –  have no means of putting forward their side of the story.

The writer, Mike Jay provides the text of the book. Generally he provides a balanced and readable account of this contentious area. Neither telling a tale of benign progress, nor, contrastingly, a catalogue of the disasters inflicted on the mentally ill by the supposedly-evil empire of psychiatry, Jay prefers to see the history of psychiatry in terms of a pendulum swinging between psychological and physical approaches to madness, and between institutional and community responses. He is thus able to see the good and bad in different periods. He is less inclined than Andrew Scull, whose recent volume, Madness in Civilisation he cites approvingly, to perceive the undoubted abuses and wrong-turnings of psychiatry in terms of wicked and self-serving clinicians, and more as a result of their misguided intentions and the sheer complexity of mental illness.

The book is divided into sections: the 18th century madhouse; the 19th century lunatic asylum; the 20th century mental hospital; and ‘beyond the asylum’. At the centre of the narrative is the story of Bethlem and its founding in the thirteenth century, which Jay goes on to trace through its evolution as a madhouse, an asylum and, finally, a modern day hospital. As Jay is well aware, Bedlam, or rather the mythology of Bedlam, has long been part of our folk-lore and culture. John Webster, Jonathan Swift and William Hogarth all depicted the institution. Jay is good on cultural representations of Bethlem and points out that, from an early stage, these portrayals bore little resemblance to the actual hospital. He mentions famous Bethlem residents such as James Tilly Matthews who drew up a visionary architectural plan for the new Bethlem which uncannily anticipated the building that was eventually created. He mentions, too, Richard Dadd, the parricide, whose strange and highly detailed paintings were, arguably, more striking than the works he created before his incarceration.

Jay also takes in developments in the rest of Britain, as well as in Europe and America. He charts the failure of the 19th century asylum which became over-crowded with incurable patients, the development in the 20th century of the mental hospital with its hope that physical treatments would return patients to their homes, and community approaches in our own time which have been ham-strung by a lack of funding. He examines the rise of pharmacology and alternative therapies. As in previous times, a variety of therapies crowd the market-place.  Jay places a particular emphasis on the story of Geel, the Belgian town where for many centuries patients have lived with local families and worked in the community. Jay sees this example as the way forward in our post asylum world.

A recurring trope in Jay’s account of the history of madness is that the world is one vast Bedlam.  He quotes the campaigner, Thomas Tryon observing in 1689: ‘The world has become a great Bedlam, where those who are more mad lock up those who are less’. (p. 52) The 19th century alienist, Dr John Conolly greatly extended the list of those he felt would benefit from asylum care. As Jay wryly observes: ‘The logic of the perfect asylum, taken to its logical conclusion, was that the entire world should become one.’ (p. 120) At the beginning of the 20th century, Jay argues,  madness seemed to have escaped the asylum and taken root in the culture at large as an entire generation was slaughtered in the insanity of the First World War. He concludes, somewhat provocatively:  ‘In the wake of the asylum, the world has become a great Bedlam’. (p. 218) Whether or not one agrees with this, it does serve to emphasise that the difference between sanity and insanity is perhaps not as marked as we would like to imagine.

The book, then, is a mixed achievement. The images veer between the stunning and the indistinct, and there is a curious lack of an ethical context to them. However, Mike Jay’s text is, in the main, even-handed, and for those new to the field, an accessible and well-written introduction to the history of psychiatry and madness.

 

Dr Allan Beveridge

Art review: chronic conditions and the digital age

9 Nov, 16 | by cquigley

Changing Lanes: Art in long term conditions in the digital age – new ways to adapt

By Shanali Perera

Rheumatic and musculoskeletal diseases are the largest growing burden of long term disability in the UK, affecting over 10 million adults. The concept of empowering patients to better engage with self-management of their long-term conditions is changing the world at an ever-increasing pace. Incorporating creativity can enhance interpersonal well-being.

slide03

Through my artwork, I aim to reflect my personal experience to raise awareness on ‘Creative empowerment – exploring the healing power of art’. Personal insights as a medic and a patient into integrating creativity, healing & health on the use of creative expression as a tool to face some of the physical limitations & challenges imposed by chronic illnesses. I am keen to tell others of my experiences as they may benefit from incorporating art or similar creative expressions into their own healing. Why not challenge illness dominance? I do so by using digital art.

I am currently a patient under the care of Rheumatology services at the Manchester Royal Infirmary, treated for vasculitis. I used digital applications for artwork to cope with pain, illness experience, adjust to living with vasculitis; to communicate with health providers, family and friends. Prior to ill health retirement, I was a Rheumatology specialist trainee and this journey has indeed been a transformative experience both personally and professionally.

slide2-copy

Copyright © 2016 Shanali Perera

Eight years of numerous A&E and hospital admissions, multiple consultations from various disciplines have given me some valuable insights into a patient’s journey. Chronic diseases can turn one’s life upside down, gradually changing the landscape of daily living. Art can be a refuge for coping with the dynamic shifts in daily routine – accepting role limitations, altering perceptions and regaining some level of control. Creativity gives something to take control of and construct a positive identity. I like to highlight the potential benefits I felt by facilitating self-expression through creativity. Art was a tool for positive reinforcement and reflective thinking for me. I found expression through Art not only represents symbolic aspects of coping but also demonstrates the many facets of emotions and degrees of pain I feel at various points, as a visual narrative. This form of non-verbal communication is effective in helping family, friends and health team gain new insights into often under estimated, emotional/spiritual elements factored into the illness experience. Seeing beyond the illness – creative expression helping to redefine self-identity. I managed to achieve a semblance of normality by starting to set more realistic goals and standards for me around my limitations. From my experience, adapting to find ways around limitations plays a key role in rebuilding confidence and progressing forward. I feel that accepting the shift in roles, reshaping and reinventing one’s self is an essential part to living with a long-term illness.

slide09

People with certain disorders not only have to deal with the general disability of the chronic illness, but also the physical limitation of expressing the “art” that is in their mind. On repeated use my hands become numb and painful, pain radiating to my shoulders. I found the use of digital medium my adaptation as it enabled me to use light touch with minimal effort and alternate hands. Less pain and fatigue became apparent in my hands and arms compared to using a paintbrush on canvas or charcoal on paper. For me, artistic expression was a means of self-exploration to convey how I was feeling. This really helped me to keep the fun side alive and regain a degree of control. This newfound freedom to explore myself through the world of colours and inner creative space, gave rise to my present work.

slide1-copy

Copyright © 2016 Shanali Perera

slide1

Copyright © 2016 Shanali Perera

I think art certainly can be used to explore and represent one’s individual journey -The way chronic illnesses are constantly changing shape, defining and re-defining itself. I feel that this aspect to self-care isn’t advocated to its full potential in people with long-term physical illnesses. There is a lot of scope to develop this further as a holistic approach to care given the wealth of studies illustrating the beneficial effects of integrating creativity and healing in long-term conditions. Present day represents the Digital age where Digital technology in healthcare is continually changing the world at anever-increasing pace. The use of digital medium/applications for creativity, especially for people with limited functional capacity/pain can be a constructive as well as an enjoyable pursuit to explore one’s creative side to cope with day-to-day struggles. Why not put this into wider use in the context of self-management of chronic illness? Let’s take a closer look at our creative space.

Be Visible! Be Heard! See yourself through art.

Correspondence to:

shanaliperera@gmail.com

Art Review: Visions of Multiple Sclerosis

28 Oct, 16 | by cquigley

 

Hannah Laycocks’s Visions of Multiple Sclerosis: Perceiving Identity

Reviewed by Shahd Alshammari, PhD.

 

When artists’ work is considered provocative, you usually think that their choice of subject is taboo. While certainly not “taboo”, the disabled body, and even more interestingly the “invisible disabled body”, in itself a paradox, is a subject that medical practitioners and society continue to struggle with. What happens to the sense of ‘self’ when the body attacks the self, essentially its own being? Hannah Laycock’s photography exhibitions ‘Perceiving Identity’ and ‘Awakenings’ launched in 2015, both  exploring the disabled body and identity.

Laycock’s work is contemporary in its subject and form, while at the same time being rooted in her own personal experience with Multiple Sclerosis (MS). Like Hannah, I have similarly struggled with MS. Many times during the day, I tell my body to behave. I say it out loud. I talk to my body, telling her to wake up. With MS, the Central Nervous System – to some extent the mind – attacks the body. Disconnected, alienated from the body, there is a breakdown of communication. The body must wake up. That is my understanding of the title of the exhibition ‘Awakenings.’ I root it in a very subjective experience, while simultaneously recognizing the work’s significance in urging society to wake up, to open its eyes to “other” ways of living and being.

‘Perceiving Identity’, titled in the same thematic way that ‘Awakenings’ is, raises a central question of interest to Disability Scholars, namely identity. I have called MS, a ‘Random Disease’ in the past, one that changes one’s life course, though not necessarily affecting mortality. In one of the photographs (Figure 1), Laycock captures a simple shot of a road. Uncomplicated, it is a road that is not paved with stones, holes or obstacles. It is what it is. In fact, the colors on the road seem to resemble the light of rainbow colors. My own vision understands the colors as orange, green, and yellow. The choice of colors symbolizes the wide array of MS identities, and MS symptoms (no two individuals have the same symptoms; the course of the disease differs from one person to another). Color blends onto the road, and sometimes, since vision can be affected in MS patients, this is not always a pleasant experience. It becomes difficult to differentiate between spaces. Other questions that chronically ill patients have voiced or left unvoiced, suppressed, include “where will my life go from here?” The road is the map, the new map that you are handed along with the diagnosis. This is the path, as unknown and random as it is.

%ef%a3%a9-hl_2014_08_20150129-tif

Figure 1. Copyright Hannah Laycock

 

Figure 2 is raw in its positioning of the artist at the forefront, as we are visually forced to focus on her back, on which she dangles what seems to be redcurrants, tracing her spine.

%ef%a3%a9-hl_2014_12_20150129

Figure 2. Copyright Hannah Laycock

The spine of course is affected in MS, as well as the brain. The redcurrant lands in its vibrancy along Laycock’s flesh, a strong contrast between the redness of the fruit and the artist’s skin. Redcurrants are supposedly beneficial in terms of a healthy immune system, efficient nerve transmission signalling, protection from free radical damage, amongst other potential effects.” Whether this is actually proven to help MS is not the point. It is yet another attempt at rebuilding a central nervous system that has chosen to break up with its significant other – the self, one’s identity. The artist holds the redcurrant in place, exhibiting control of her body, an attempt at the very least to alter the course of the disease, to do one’s part, to eat healthy, to be vigilant in fighting the disease.

All of the photographs that Laycock has beautifully presented share this theme of disconnection, of a breakdown of what is essentially communication between the mind and the body. As a Disability Studies scholar and someone who sees through the difficulty, and randomness, of living with this undefinable and uncanny disease (uncanny because it is unhomely, it is a body that used to house me just fine), I can say that Laycock’s work is bold and does not attempt to rectify or beautify or inspire. It recognizes the unpredictability and confusion of the disease, both for the patient and for medical practitioners. Nobody has answers, as frustrating as it is. Laycock’s work tells a fragmented narrative, part of the fragmentation of MS, of living with this disease, and seems to force you into her lived experience, rather than just standing along the sidelines, using diagnostic words, and labeling MS as ‘degenerative.’ The photographs carry a sense of closeness and intimacy. As viewers we are almost forced to stop and think about the literal and figurative meanings in Laycock’s artistic vision. Each photograph encourages us to pause and to ask “what is going on?”

And that question in itself is a repeated and dominant one in the lives of MS patients and neurologists attempting to diagnose and cure MS.

Hannah Laycock’s work can be viewed here: http://www.hannahlaycock.com/Portfolio/Perceiving-Identity.aspx

 

Related reading

Devan Stahl, Darian Goldin Stahl. Seeing illness in art and medicine: a patient and printmaker collaboration. Med Humanities 2016;42:3 155159.

Exhibition Review: Rest & Its Discontents

6 Oct, 16 | by cquigley

leaflet-lowres_page_1

 

Rest & Its Discontents Exhibition

Curated by Robert Devcic, founder of GV Art London

Mile End Art Pavilion, 30 September until 30 October 2016

 

Reviewed by Natasha Feiner

 

Modern life is busy, exhausting, and stressful. Yet, rest remains as important as ever. But what does it mean to rest in the modern world? Does rest, or its absence, impact on individual health and wellbeing?

 

London, UK. 4th March, 2016. Campaigners from the Mental Health Resistance Network and DPAC block traffic on the busy Old St round in portest against the use of Maximus job coaches in GP surgeries to "create jobs by prescription." They say disabled people will be bullied into unsuitable work and lose benefits through sanctions. Peter Marshall/Alamy Live News

Mental Health Resistance Network, Reclaiming our lives and work struggles past, present and future

Rest & Its Discontents, a major new exhibition exploring the dynamics of rest, seeks to answer these questions. It draws on the research of Hubbub, an international collective of social scientists, artists, humanities researchers, scientists, broadcasters, public engagement professionals and mental health experts. Over the past two years the team, based at the Wellcome Collection in London, has explored the dynamics of rest, exhaustion, noise, tumult, and work, as they operate in mental health, neuroscience, the arts and the everyday. This exhibition is their final major event.

Rest & Its Discontents features the work of over twenty-five Hubbub contributors. Work from a number of different academic disciplines is presented in a multitude of formats including audio recordings, film, and interactive installations. A number of topics are explored in the exhibition, including therapeutic relaxation, breath and musical ‘rest’, and sleep studies.

antonia-barnett-mcintosh-breath-still-from-film-2015-image-courtesy-of-ed-prosser-2

Antonia Barnett-McIntosh, Breath, still from film, 2015. Image courtesy of Ed Prosser

nina-garthwaite-default-mode-radio-network-image-courtesy-ed-prosser

Nina Garthwaite, Default Mode Radio Network. Image courtesy Ed Prosser

Highlights include ‘The Cubiculum’, which invites visitors to explore the history of mind-wandering through sound and spoken word, and ‘Cartographies of Rest’, a multi-screen installation that visualises interactions between noise and mood.

The exhibition is accompanied by an event series, including workshops, poetry performances, and panel discussions with psychologists and journalists. I have booked tickets for ‘The Meditative Response’ workshop, which will bring together historian Ayesha Nathoo and composer Eugene Skeef. The workshop promises to ‘create a collective experience akin to the relaxation response’. Other events this month will centre on anti-work politics, self-tracking, and mental health.

A BBC Radio 4 series, The Anatomy of Rest, also accompanies the exhibition. First broadcast in September, the three-part series it is now available in full on BBC iPlayer. Presented by Claudia Hammond, the series asks what rest means to historians, poets, and neuroscientists. The final episode announces the results of the ‘Rest Test’, which asked 18,000 people from 193 countries why and how they rest. The data from the test has been visualised as a fabric pattern covering a series of benches in the Mile End exhibition space.

claudia-hammond-the-rest-test-rest-zone-2016-digitial-print-image-courtesy-of-lustlab

Claudia Hammond, The Rest Test & Rest Zone, 2016, digitial print. Image courtesy of LUSTlab

An open access publication, The Restless Compendium, explores many of the exhibition’s themes further. Comprising twenty-two essays on rest and its opposites, it extends and develops many of the exhibition’s major themes. The Restless Compendium is available here as a free download: http://hubbubresearch.org/restlesscompendium/

Rest & Its Discontents is wide-ranging in its exploration of rest and its opposites. It is, like the Hubbub project more broadly, truly interdisciplinary. As a result it offers novel and interesting perspectives that, while at times abstract, will no doubt interest humanities scholars, scientists, and medical practitioners. The exhibition is best enjoyed alongside its accompanying event series, radio show, and publication. These are all speak to each other and add new layers of depth and meaning to the installations and displays at the Mile End site.

sj-fowler-maja-jantar-soundings-iii-2016-image-courtesy-of-ed-prosser1

SJ Fowler & Maja Jantar, Soundings III, 2016. Image courtesy of Ed Prosser

 

For more information, and to book events, visit: http://hubbubresearch.org/

 

The Mile End Art Pavilion, Clinton Road, London E3 4QY.

Opening hours 12:00-18:00, Tuesday-Sunday. Closed on Monday.

Late opening Thursday 6 October, until 21:00.

Admission is free.

 

Natasha Feiner is a PhD student at the University of Exeter. Twitter @natashafeiner.

THIS IS A VOICE at Wellcome Collection reviewed

16 Jun, 16 | by cquigley

L0081645 'His Masters Voice'. Painting by Franci

‘His Masters Voice’. Painting by Francis Barraud, 1919. Credit:Courtesy of the EMI Group Archive Trust

 

THIS IS A VOICE

Wellcome Collection, 14 April – 31 July 2016

Reviewed by Steven Kenny

 

Approaching the exhibition entrance of THIS IS A VOICE at the Wellcome Collection, it is easy to think the voice is treated as criminal, being contained, controlled and its behaviour segregated from the world outside. Initial thoughts would suggest that it is being acoustically surveyed; with the steady opening and closing of the exhibition door, sound rushes to the exit. Yet its attempts are ultimately futile, the room has been sound proofed, noise restricted from accessing the outside world. On entering the space, grey triangular padded shapes line the walls, detail reminiscent of a kitsch science fiction film from the 1980s. The exposed patterned structures, evocative of the décor of Ridley Scott’s periled spaceship in Alien, enclose you in a warm, familiar hug of nostalgia. Sensing that this space is one visually tread before, it is easy to forget the prestigious institutional context of the exhibition. THIS IS A VOICE, a show investigating the potential of the voice in all its forms, techniques, objects and cultural baggage, is particularly engaging for it knowingly understands such a topic cannot be wholly represented (due to various cultural and language complexities). Yet it does a heartfelt job in attempting to at least understand how the voice as a product, both commercially and non-commercially viable, can be exhibited. Curatorial flourishes can be found everywhere, from the nooks and crannies of seated listening stations to the maze-like paths that allow a gentle flow of avid listeners from one space to the next. From attending numerous shows at the Wellcome Collection I must comment that THIS IS A VOICE is one of the most stimulating and generally refreshing exhibitions to be held in its space.

It would seem that an inner versus outer exploration of the body and the voice is focused on throughout. One telling example of this is immediately apparent in the work Circular Song, 1974 by Joan La Barbara. A half dome like structure hangs from the ceiling, the speaker’s hollow interior pervading the space below with sound. The experience of entering this wall of sound is generally unnerving, a constant and increasingly uncomfortable echo of inhaling and exhaling performed by the artist, breathes all over you. It is nightmarish, a deathly noise that would seem totally apt in the exhaling howls of a victim being chased by a stalker in a nerve inducing slasher film. Sound in this manner is represented as an abject substance, an uncanny emotional pulling of the visitors’ own sentiments to the body and the amplified vocalisation of a body process that now seems one of disgust. Yet this is in direct contrast to Marcus Coates multi-screen film installation Dawn Chorus, 2007, which is silly, funny and surprisingly touching. This room is filled with the fluttering sounds of birdsong, a number of monitors positioned at varying heights depicting subjects in everyday locations comically singing along to each sound created. Experiencing this work initially seemed deceptive­­–I could not understand how both image and sound aligned so perfectly, as though the birdsong was actually being produced by a human lip whistle. Subjects pursed their lips and jotted their heads up and down in perfect alignment. The façade is lifted on reading the work’s description: ‘After recording the dawn chorus with multiple microphones, the individual birdsongs were slowed down to last approximately 16 times as long, which enabled the participants to imitate them, while being filmed’. Yet not knowing these details did not matter as my imagination roamed freely around the space. I observed each subject as one would watch a bird in the wild, mesmerised by its harmonic whistle and merry bouncing of its head.

Words

THIS IS A VOICE at Wellcome Collection, 2016. Credit:Photography by Michael Bowles

Dotted around the exhibition are various textual works, the written word laid bare. Erik Bunger’s wall text I Hearby Command You to Give Voice to These Letters Silently or Out Loud, 2011 was surprising in that it forced an involuntary restriction of my own voice from permeating the gallery. I so badly wanted to shout out loud the words I was reading yet thought better than to add to the already noisy space. Yet on second thoughts maybe that would have made for some interesting spectator reactions. Bunger’s playful register, was paralleled by Mikhail Karikis’s digital prints (photographs by Thierry Bal) Sculpting Voice, 2010, where the artist was photographically recorded pulling various facial gestures. Three prints line the wall in sequence, each exhibiting Karikis’s comically retuned face, made even more comical by the muting of what would probably have been quite a painful or otherwise loud projection of sound.

L0081817 THIS IS A VOICE at Wellcome Collection, p

THIS IS A VOICE at Wellcome Collection. Credit:Photography by Michael Bowles

 

The exhibition saved its loudest and most intriguing work for last. Entering the final room of the show, you would think that you might have woken in a Lynchian nightmare. Best described as an interactive, participatory constructed, sound installation, a lone and somewhat foredooming sound booth, tempts the spectator.

L0081800 Matthew Herbert, Chorus, 2016

Matthew Herbert, Chorus, 2016. Credit:Photography by Michael Bowles

The aptly titled Chorus, 2016 is by the British electronic musician Matthew Herbert, whose work ‘asks visitors to sing a single note within a professional recording booth following a set of instructions. The visitor’s voices are then automatically added to a chorus of voices, including performers and staff from the Royal Opera House, forming an ever-expanding sound installation that plays in the exhibition space and at the Royal Opera House’s Stage Door in Covent Garden’. I entered the space to sing the requested solitary note. Escaping my throat, my voice joined the squeaks, squeals, and sometimes correctly pitched notes above. Noise reverberated violently throughout the room, puncturing the space like a diminished fifth encroaching a melodic passage. The voice in this exhibition is presented as an ever-changing entity, one that is able to attack, calm and arrest.

 

Articles from Medical Humanities on the human voice:

Kelly BD. Searching for the patient’s voice in the Irish asylums. Med Humanit 2016;42:87-91.

Demjén Z and Semino E. Henry’s voices: the representation of auditory verbal hallucinations in an autobiographical narrative. Med Humanities 2015;41:1 5762.

Puustinen R. Voices to be heard—the many positions of a physician in Anton Chekhov’s short story, A Case History. Med Humanities 2000;26:1 3742.

 

Art, Life and Illness

16 May, 16 | by cquigley

 

David Marron: Encounters

 

Columba Quigley

GV Art London, David Marron, Geras 3, 2013, charcoal and acrylic on board, 60 x 42cm

David Marron, Geras 3, 2013. Image courtesy of the artist and GV Art, London

I was fortunate to catch this exhibition, held over the May Bank Holiday weekend at Lumen Studios, The Crypt, St John on Bethnal Green.

David Marron is both an artist and a paramedic.

The exhibition consisted of 12 pieces, charcoal, acrylic and collage on paper, standing on and supported by crutches.

These are multi-layered and complex works. As you stand before each, more unfolds with every moment of prolonged gaze.

Marron’s probing work is steeped in the essence of humanness, in the complexity, vulnerability and fragility of life itself and of those who inhabit it.

The artist’s experience as a paramedic affords him a unique viewpoint – that liminal space that he witnesses between wellness and illness, between living and dying, where life is suspended and where outcome is often unknown.

Following the exhibition, I had the opportunity to chat to Marron about his work. Initially trained in fine art, his working life brought him to the world of hospitals and the unwell. This witnessing, of the transformations and experiences of illness, changed the nature of Marron’s art. Previously, he reflects, his work had been more self-obsessed. Becoming part of the world of illness transported him away from a more personal interior world and towards a consideration of that of others.

In his work as a paramedic, Marron might only spend very short periods of time with patients on their journey to hospital. The encounters that moved him emotionally resulted in a transmutation of the feelings such interactions generated into the drawings on display. Yet each piece does not represent a single encounter or a specific individual, but is rather a conflation of a number of similar emotional experiences.

The piece Run Away Robin, for example, is not a direct portrait but was informed by a number of encounters with patients suffering from dementia. The piece represents a piecing together of the emotional fragments that Marron took away from such interactions: the nobility and stoicism that accompany the manner in which the elderly deal with memory loss; the masks they create, often using obstinacy and non compliance to hide their fears; and the fragmentation of self that accompanies the condition, here seen by the snippets of repeated words that hold meaning to the utterer even if uninterpretable by us.

 

GV Art London, David Marron, Run away Robin, 2015, charcoal and acrylic on paper, 84 x 59cm

David Marron, Run away Robin, 2015. Image courtesy of the artist and GV Art, London

A Tooth for a Tooth reminded me of Munch’s The Scream – that primordial sense of pain and anguish, seemingly uncommunicable in its silence. Any yet not, as we confront the distress so vividly here on canvas. The violence of this lived experience is hard to bear witness to, and yet there is so much tenderness in the lines that Marron draws to communicate this emotion that we rest our gaze and stay with the sufferer.

GV Art London, David Marron, A Tooth for a Tooth, 2014-15, Charcoal, acrylic and collage on paper, 84 x 59cm

David Marron, A Tooth for a Tooth, 2014-15. Image courtesy of the artist and GV Art, London

Marron is unafraid to share the challenges and pathos of the lived experience, witnessing it acutely as a paramedic. Yet his work also celebrates life throughout, most notably in Fentanyl Dreams, which vividly communicates the force of the newly born.

GV Art London, David Marron, Fentanyl Dreams, 2012-14, Charcoal, acrylic and collage on paper, 84 x 59cm

David Marron, Fentanyl Dreams, 2012-14. Image courtesy of the artist and GV Art, London

Marron is also a sculptor. However, for the works and themes presented in Encounters, drawing for the artist facilitated a unique truth and directness. He works quickly. Once inspired, the initial charcoal drawing is ready within 3-4 hours. Structures are built around this draft, followed by revisions. The sense of speed involved in their creation imbues the pieces with much energy and a less calculated finished product.

The exhibition also includes a video, En Route, which takes you on a journey through London, a horizontal view from within an ambulance. Buildings and sky whizz by, the world outside continuing and ignorant of what is happening inside the vehicle and within the world of the ill. The poem Ambulances by Philip Larkin came to mind:

‘Closed like confessionals, they thread

Loud noons of cities, giving back

None of the glances they absorb.

Light glossy grey, arms on a plaque,

They come to rest at any kerb:

All streets in time are visited.’

 

The poem ends:

‘Unreachable inside a room

The traffic parts to let go by

Brings closer what is left to come,

And dulls to distance all we are.’

from Ambulances, by Philip Larkin.

 

Our fragility, vulnerability, finiteness – further exemplified by the works being mounted on crutches – are clearly evidenced in Marron’s work, and are so beautifully communicated with much tenderness and compassion.

 

http://www.davidmarron.com

GV Art London, curators, producers & artist agent, represents David Marron amongst others.

 

The Reading Room: Short-list for the 2016 Hippocrates Prize for Poetry and Medicine

22 Mar, 16 | by cquigley

 

Fragility of the human form: short-list for the 2016 Hippocrates Prize for Poetry and Medicine

 

The Hippocrates Initiative for Poetry and Medicine – winner of the 2011 Times Higher Education Award for Innovation and Excellence in the Arts – is an interdisciplinary venture that investigates the synergy between medicine, the arts and health.

Poets from New York and the UK are among the finalists for this year’s prize. Short-listed in the Open Category are Owen Lewis, child psychiatrist and poet from New York, and from the UK poets Anne Ryland from Berwick-on-Tweed and Jane McLaughlin from London.

Competing for the UK NHS 2016 Hippocrates first prize are paediatric cardiologist Denise Bundred from Camberley, former consultant haematologist Karen Patricia Schofield from Crewe and GP Chris Woods from Bury.

Find out more about the shortlisted poets.

The judges also agreed 16 commendations in the NHS category, and 17 commendations in the Open International category from Australia, France, England, Ireland, Scotland, New Zealand and the USA.

Find out more about the commended poets.

The winners will be announced at an awards ceremony in London on Friday April 15, 2016.

Check out the Medical Humanities poetry section here.

 

 

Ayesha Ahmad: Introduction to Global Humanities—Through Creation, Violence Will Die

15 Mar, 16 | by Ayesha Ahmad

Against the backdrop of violence, I have been examining through my research the qualities of our human condition that perpetuate both our survival and our spirit.

As an introduction to an ongoing series on Global Humanities, I will be discussing ways we can counter the dominant narrative of violence.

Our globalised world, or rather, the collective ‘Other’, is met through encounters from suffering—the patients that enter our clinical settings, the individuals that sacrifice their lives to reach the shores of safety, and the images that we only ever see from afar of stories that breathe suffering.

more…

Khalid Ali: Ageing (dis)gracefully from Camden pavements to Swiss resorts

10 Nov, 15 | by Ayesha Ahmad

Review of “The lady in the van” directed by Nicholas Hytner, UK release 13th November 2015, and “Youth” directed by Paolo Sorrentino, UK release January 2016

“The lady in the van” and “Youth” that recently premièred at the London Film Festival (LFF) in October 2015 are two great films about “senior citizens” in two completely different settings. “The lady in the van” is based on Alan Bennett’s (the famous English writer, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alan_Bennett) interactions with Miss shepherd in Camden Town in the late 70’s, while “Youth” is a fictional story of three mature artists set in a Swiss Alps resort. In the first instance, the viewer might not immediately see the connection between the two films; however upon closer inspection, one can appreciate that both films explore the trials and tribulations of old age in two distinct socioeconomic backgrounds with striking similarities in their points of view.

more…

Medical humanities blog homepage

Medical Humanities

An international peer review journal for health professionals and researchers in medical humanities. Visit site



Creative Comms logo

Latest from Medical Humanities

Latest from Medical Humanities