What’s the Point of Professional Ethical Codes?

For a few reasons, I’ve been thinking a bit over the last few months about professionalism and professional codes.  In fact, that’s the topic that’s attracted most of my attention here since… oooh, ages ago.  I find the idea of a code of professional ethics troubling in many ways, but also fascinating.  And one of […]

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Law Changes and Slippery Slopes

Apparently, there was a TV programme in Australia the other day in which a there was a discussion of assisted dying.  It got reported in The Guardian, largely on the basis that an 81-year-old audience member kept calling Margaret Somerville “darling” and then got mildly sweary.  I’ve only seen those clips from the programme that […]

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A Matter of Life and Death

Guest Post by Professor Lynn Turner-Stokes Re: A matter of life and death – controversy at the interface between clinical and legal decision-making in prolonged disorders of consciousness In an article published in the JME, I highlight the confusion that exists amongst many clinicians, lawyers and members of the public about decisions with withdraw life-sustaining treatments […]

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LECTURE: Rebalancing Empowerment and Protection: Evolving Legal Frameworks for Impaired Capacity

Thursday 8 December 2016, 18:00 – 19:00 UCL Gustave Tuck Lecture Theatre, Wilkins Building, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT Speaker: Professor Mary Donnelly (University College Cork) Chair: TBC Accreditation: This event is accredited with 1 CPD hour with the SRA and BSB Admission: Free, Registration required (here)   The past decade has seen a notable […]

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Are Single Men in the UK Entitled to have a Baby using Fertility Treatment?

Guest post by Atina Krajewska, Rachel Cahill-O’Callaghan, and Melanie Fellowes The World Health Organisation is currently considering a change in the definition of infertility according to which, it has been reported, “single men and women without medical issues [would] be classed as ‘infertile’, if they do not have children but want to become a parent.”  Although […]

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Further Clarity on Co-operation and Morality

Guest Post by David S. Oderberg, University of Reading Re: Further clarity on co-operation and morality The 2014 US Supreme Court decision in Burwell v. Hobby Lobby was a landmark case on freedom of religion and conscience in the USA. The so-called ‘contraceptive mandate’ of the Affordable Care Act (aka Obamacare) requires employers to provide health insurance […]

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Event: Courting Controversy?

This might be of interest to some readers: Courting Controversy?  Recent Developments in Health Care Law 21 July 2016 Chancellors Hotel, Chancellors Way, Moseley Road, Fallowfield, Manchester M14 6NN This afternoon seminar examines some controversial recent developments in health care law and introduces two new books on law and medicine: Margaret Brazier and Emma Cave Medicine, […]

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Recent Attempts to Restrict the Abortion Law in Poland: A Commentary

Guest post by Dr Atina Krajewska, University of Sheffield A couple of weeks ago news hit the headlines about attempts to introduce a total ban on abortion in Poland.  The legislative proposal that caused outrange among women’s rights organisations has been drafted by a citizen’s initiative, “Stop Abortion”, and is the fourth attempt to restrict abortion […]

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No to Conscientious Objection Accommodation in Health Care

Guest post by Udo Schuklenk Canada is currently in the midst of a national debate about the scope of assisted dying regulations and policies.  It’s a result of a 2015 Supreme Court ruling that declared parts of the country’s Criminal Code null and void that criminalises assisted dying.  As you would expect, there is a […]

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