Their Poor Little Heads might Explode

There’s a nice little piece by Martin Robbins in this week’s Guardian in which he talks about the fact that women seem to be less supportive of abortion than men.  That does seem counterintuitive, given that… well, given the obvious physiological facts and the relative burden of risks related to pregnancy.  So there’s an interesting little anthropological […]

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Sex-Selection and Abortion: Is there a Problem?

This is just a quick post, and it’s mainly to draw your attention to a couple of other posts worth reading elsewhere. A little background: there’s been a minor fuss* in the media over the last few days concerning sex-specific abortion**, after The Independent reported that [t]he practice of sex-selective abortion is now so commonplace that […]

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Identity and IVF

It’s good to see that Stephen Latham is blogging again after a short hiatus; and he’s come back with a really thought-provoking post on IVF and problems of identity. The background is this: apparently, there is evidence that children conceived by IVF are at an elevated risk of health problems compared to kids conceived naturally: […]

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How to write a crap essay/paper in bioethics – or how to write bioethics to be published in medical journals…

I’ve been considering writing a reflective piece about the general quality of bioethics papers in medical journals, focusing on how the medium (the audience and the severe word limits) impacts on the message and its quality – possibly as a bit of a moan since I’ve not yet managed to get a medical journal to […]

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Research Ethics and Ethical Problems

Noted on Ben Goldacre’s twitter feed a couple of weeks ago was this article in Slate about the recruitment of pregnant women into drug trials. Essentially, there’s a situation in which there’s a dearth of information about the impact of drugs during pregnancy.  According to the article, [p]harmaceutical companies are not willing to navigate the […]

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Safety First? How the Current Drug Approval System Lets Some Patients Down

Post by Julian Savulescu Cross-posted from the Practical Ethics blog, and relating to this paper in the JME. Andrew Culliford, whose story is featured in the Daily Mail, is one of the estimated 7 in 100,000 people living with Motor Neuron disease, a progressive degenerative disease which attacks muscles, leaving those affected eventually unable even to […]

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Emmerich on Fitness to Practise

Having asked out loud whether anyone could explain a couple of odd FtP decisions, I got this from Nathan Emmerich, offering sociological pop at an answer…  Iain wondered if anyone could explain the morality that underlies a couple of recent Fitness to Practise decisions made by the GMC.  Well, more accurately he wondered if anyone […]

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