Spinal cord injury in multiple sclerosis: why is this important for MS clinical trials?

For patients with multiple sclerosis (MS), sustained long-term disability is a problem that elicits considerable concern. There is the impact on independence and the potential burden that it may lead to for caregivers. While treatments for MS seem to multiply by the year, established disability remains the one area that is still refractory to treatment. […]

Read More…

Confused about encephalopathy? Here’s something that may help.

Confusion. Agitation. Irritability. A wander around any emergency department or neurology ward will yield an abundance of observations that can fall under these categories and yet these are not all due to long waiting times or general hospital mayhem. All these symptoms are common presentations of neurological dysfunction and they are features of that syndrome […]

Read More…

Dementia in Parkinson’s disease: what can we do about it?

It has been around 200 years since James Parkinson first outlined the clinical features of the condition that would later bear his name. While his descriptions of Parkinson’s Disease (‘shaking palsy’) may have focussed largely around the motor manifestations of this condition, recent insights have provided strong evidence that non-motor manifestations contribute significantly to poor […]

Read More…

Infections and cancer: any link to brain tumours?

There have been numerous postulated links between the development of cancer following exposure to infectious organisms. In the case of the connection between human papilloma virus and cervical cancer, this association has led to ground-breaking treatments in the form of vaccination. A similar connection has been developed between hepatitis B and liver cancer. While many […]

Read More…

Neurodegeneration in MS: A clue to diability?

Corticla tarophy has been proposed as an imprtant pathophysiological mechanisms in disability development in progressive forms of multiple sclerosis.  A number of studies utilsing sophistcated MRI tehcniques have yielded such evidence.  In this issue of JNNP and elegant study demonstrated the importance of neurodegeneration at a pathological level, “reflected by a global reduction of neuronal […]

Read More…

Forbes Norris Award for editor of JNNP-Professor Matthew Kiernan

It gives me great pleasure to announce that Matthew Kiernan was awarded the highly prestigious Forbes Norris Award by the International ALS Alliance. The Forbes Norris Award, first presented in 1994, honours the memory of Dr. Forbes “Ted” Norris (1928 – 1993), a neurologist who dedicated his career to helping people with ALS/MND. The purpose […]

Read More…

Stress and stroke

There are a number of risk factors that we commonly associate with stroke, including hypertension, smoking history, and diabetes. The current issue of JNNP explores the role of stress resilience in the aetiology of stroke http://jnnp.bmj.com/content/85/12/1331.abstract . The authors have assessed a large Swedish male population and have provided interesting insights into the role of […]

Read More…

Working ok with CMT?

The issue of whether excessive work may lead to increased weakness in hereditary neuropathy is a vexing one and critical for patient management.  in this issue of JNNP this notion has been categorcially dismissed.  There was no worsening weakness with overwork in a  large CMT1A cohort.   Read more:   http://jnnp.bmj.com/content/85/12/1354.abstract Neurol Neurosurg Psychiatry 2014;85:1354-1358 […]

Read More…