Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis: from Charcot to cutting edge molecular genetics

For most clinicians, having to tell a patient that they have motor neuron disease/amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a difficult and challenging dilemma. In the community, it is one of the few remaining conditions that are inseparably linked with severe physical disability resulting in loss of independence and eventually loss of life. On a more […]

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Peptic ulcers, Nobel Prizes and Multiple Sclerosis

It has been a decade now since Barry Marshall and Robin Warren from the University of Western Australia (UWA) were awarded the Nobel Prize for Medicine for discovering the link between Helicobacter Pylori (H.pylori) and the development of peptic ulcers. Famously, their discovery involved Marshall ingesting the bacteria himself in order to prove his hypothesis. […]

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Medication-overuse headache: finally, we have an intervention that works.

Headache. Common, painful, frustrating, exhausting- and that’s just what the neurologist feels when a headache patient walks in the room. The patients themselves are often at their wits end as headache, whatever the cause, is often functional incapacitating and can really ruin quality of life. Of all the headache types that are seen in neurology, […]

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Temozolomide reduces risk of seizures in low grade glioma!

Low grade gliomas are associated with a higher frequency of seizures.  While antieplipetic medications are utilized to reduced seizure frequency, in this issue of JNNP temozolomide was also associated with a a significant reduction in seizure frequency.  Perhaps temozolomide should be added to therapy of LGGs with intractable seizures.   Read more at http://jnnp.bmj.com/content/86/4/366.abstract   […]

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Spinal cord injury in multiple sclerosis: why is this important for MS clinical trials?

For patients with multiple sclerosis (MS), sustained long-term disability is a problem that elicits considerable concern. There is the impact on independence and the potential burden that it may lead to for caregivers. While treatments for MS seem to multiply by the year, established disability remains the one area that is still refractory to treatment. […]

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Confused about encephalopathy? Here’s something that may help.

Confusion. Agitation. Irritability. A wander around any emergency department or neurology ward will yield an abundance of observations that can fall under these categories and yet these are not all due to long waiting times or general hospital mayhem. All these symptoms are common presentations of neurological dysfunction and they are features of that syndrome […]

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Dementia in Parkinson’s disease: what can we do about it?

It has been around 200 years since James Parkinson first outlined the clinical features of the condition that would later bear his name. While his descriptions of Parkinson’s Disease (‘shaking palsy’) may have focussed largely around the motor manifestations of this condition, recent insights have provided strong evidence that non-motor manifestations contribute significantly to poor […]

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Infections and cancer: any link to brain tumours?

There have been numerous postulated links between the development of cancer following exposure to infectious organisms. In the case of the connection between human papilloma virus and cervical cancer, this association has led to ground-breaking treatments in the form of vaccination. A similar connection has been developed between hepatitis B and liver cancer. While many […]

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