Non-contiguous propagation of ALS: River of hyperexcitability?

The site of disease onset in ALS remains enigmatic, and resolution of this quandary could shed light of ALS pathogenesis and may be of therapeutic significance. Previous studies suggested a contiguous spread of disease, implying a role for local (spinal) factors in ALS pathogenesis. In contrast, Sekiguchi and colleagues report non-contiguous spread, a well observed […]

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When being overweight pays off!

Factors influencing mortality in ALS are clearly multifactorial.  The ability to determine these factors and subsequently modify them could be of therapeutic significance in ALS.  The large EPIC cohort recently established that a higher body mass index may be neuroprotective, i.e. reduce mortality in ALS, which was evident in both males and females.  This association […]

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When chocolate does not taste sweet!

Omar and colleagues identified abnormalities in processing and identification of common flavors in patients with frontotemporal lobe syndromes.  This loss of flavor processing was associated with atrophy of the left entorhinal cortex, hippocampus, parahippocampal gyrus and temporal pole.  From a clinical perspective, these findings provide insights into abnormal eating behavior patterns in FTD and ultimately […]

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Do patient ratings of symptoms match functional improvements in Parkinson’s Disease?

  It may seem strange, but asking patients with Parkinson’s disease to rate how much their symptoms have improved doesn’t seem to match up to clinical improvements, at least as assessed by using the conventional symptoms scores used by clinical researchers.   Doctors and researchers use different symptom scores to help measure the symptoms of […]

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