You don't need to be signed in to read BMJ Blogs, but you can register here to receive updates about other BMJ products and services via our site.

New Resources

16 Aug, 12 | by shellraine, e-Media Editor

  WHO Guidance – Safe abortion: technical and policy guidance for health systems

The second edition of this guidance has now been published and is available from:  http://extranet.who.int/iris/bitstream/10665/70914/1/9789241548434_eng.pdf

  RCOG – The Initial Management of Chronic Pelvic Pain,  (Green-top 41)

New guidance published in May available from: http://www.rcog.org.uk/womens-health/clinical-guidance/initial-management-chronic-pelvic-pain-green-top-41

RCN – SDI and IUT Accreditation Guidance Documents – Sixth Edition

Accreditation, which is valid for 5 years costs £360 for members and £480 for non-members – re-accrediation is £180 and £240.

Available from: http://www.rcn.org.uk/development/learning/accreditation/LARC_accreditation

“Don’t go in without a skin”

Online condoms and lubes provider the Freedoms Shop (Central & North West London NHS Foundation Trust) has teamed up with Terrence Higgins Trust to launch the Summer Lovin’ campaign – urging gay men across London to use condoms – with a new online health resource. The downloadable resource brings together stacks of health and sexual safety information, presented in a cheeky, accessible way, while Freedoms is providing a half price condoms

 

SRH News from American Journals

1 Jun, 12 | by shellraine, e-Media Editor

Effectiveness of Long-Acting Reversible Contraception

From the New England Journal of Medicine: A large (7486 paticipants) prospective cohort study, by researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, to evaluate contraceptive methods has found dramatic differences in their effectiveness. Women who used pills, the patch or vaginal ring were 20 times more likely to have an unintended pregnancy than those who used longer-acting forms such as an intrauterine device (IUD) or implant.

And from the American Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology

Rapid repeat pregnancy in adolescents: do immediate postpartum contraceptive implants make a difference?

The purpose of this study in Colorado was to determine contraceptive continuation and repeat pregnancy rates in adolescents who are offered immediate postpartum etonogestrel implant insertion and showed excellent continuation 1 year after delivery; rapid repeat pregnancy was significantly decreased compared with control participants.

Predictors of long-acting reversible contraception use among unmarried young adults

The objective of the study from South Carolina was to improve the understanding of long-acting reversible contraception (LARC) use patterns among unmarried, young adults at risk of unintended pregnancy. LARC use was associated with older age, high IUD knowledge, and earlier onset of sexual activity and concluded that increasing knowledge of IUD among certain groups may improve LARC use among young, unmarried adults and in turn decrease unintended pregnancy.

Knowledge of contraceptive effectiveness

Another study from St Louis, Missouri looking at 4144 women’s knowledge of contraceptive effectiveness and, not surprisingly, showed many gaps.

Unintended pregnancy and contraception among active-duty servicewomen and veterans

The number of women of childbearing age who are active-duty service members or veterans of the US military is increasing. These women may seek reproductive health care at medical facilities operated by the military, in the civilian sector, or through the Department of Veterans Affairs. This article reviews the current data on unintended pregnancy and prevalence of and barriers to contraceptive use among active-duty and veteran women. Active-duty servicewomen have high rates of unintended pregnancy and low contraceptive use, which may be due to official prohibition of sexual activity in the military, logistic difficulties faced by deployed women, and limited patient and provider knowledge of available contraceptives. In comparison, little is known about rates of unintended pregnancy and contraceptive use among women veterans. Based on this review, research recommendations to address these issues are provided.

Antenatal sexually transmitted infection screening in private and indigent clinics in a community hospital system

The study aimed to determine whether clinics that serve indigent patients demonstrate equal compliance with sexually transmitted infection testing guidelines when compared with private clinics in North Carolina. They concluded that clinics serving indigent patient populations had a higher compliance with required testing compared to private clinics. HIV testing in the third trimester remains the greatest need for improvement for all practice types.

From the Journal – October 2011 issue

6 Oct, 11 | by shellraine, e-Media Editor

The newly published Journal includes a number of articles related to abortion: a book review; a commentary on medical abortion in Ethiopia – for which there is also a podcast; an Israeli view of the status of a foetus; HIV testing in clinics and repeat attendance in Britain.

In addition there is a profile of FIAPAC, the international organisation for abortion providers who have their next biennial Congress in Edinburgh in October 2012.

In Letters to the Editor there is continuing correspondence discussing the emotive subject of the use of cervical analgesia for IUD/IUS fitting which seems to have polarised opinion more than any other issue for some time.

The printed journal was accompanied by the most recently published Faculty Guidance on Emergency Contraception (2011), available electronically from: http://www.fsrh.org/pdfs/CEUguidanceEmergencyContraception11.pdf. This updates the previous guidance from 2006, includes the new oral preparation, ulipristal acetate, a progesterone receptor modulator licensed for use up to 5 days after unprotected sex and refers to the guidance for Quick Starting Contraception (2010) which details how to ‘quick start’ after use of emergency contraception.

This Guidance follows neatly on from the CEU Statement on Missed Pill Recommendations (May 2011), which accompanied the last edition of the Journal which also included a commentary by Dr Diana Mansour; Revision of the ‘missed pill’ rules, which details the background to the changes.  The statement was published after the MHRA asked the Faculty Clinical Effectiveness Unit to review its previous guidance (2005), with a view to producing harmonised guidance. This the CEU subsequently did and the new guidance has been endorsed and adopted by the MHRA, fpa and BNF although unfortunately not by the pharmaceutical industry.

BNF 62 includes the amended instructions for starting and switching combined hormonal contraception to take into account the above recommendations.  Continuing the initiative of working closely with the Clinical Effectiveness Committee the BNF section on Contraception (7.3) is up to date and in line with FSRH guidance. This makes it an accurate resource particularly for GPs and Practice Nurses who use it more than any other group of clinicians.

CD ROMs

The latest Faculty Presidents Newsletter, which also accompanied the print journal, highlights the need for all services and clinicians to dispose of and not use any of the old training CD ROMs for IUDs, implants and EC. Trainees should only use the up-to-date training modules from the e-learning website: www.e-lfh.org.uk.

Latest from JFPRHC

Latest from JFPRHC