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What is The Course of 5?

13 Apr, 12 | by shellraine, e-Media Editor

The Course of 5 (C5) is the 2nd stage of the new DFSRH blended learning training package – it provides a link between the theory element (e-SRH) and the practical, clinical assessments (ACP).

What is involved in C5? 5 one-hour, assessed workshops in groups of no more than 4 per facilitator. These are usually offered as a one-day or 2 half day package organised locally by Faculty Registered Trainers. They can also be done as 5 individual sessions.

When can I do thisC5 cannot be undertaken until you have registered for the diploma and e-portfolio and have completed the e-SRH sessions. It must be passed before moving on to clinical practice.

What is covered? The content is fixed by the Faculty and covers:
Session 1 – Taking a Sexual History and HIV pre test discussion and testing
Session 2 – STI Screening and Testing and Teaching the use of Condoms
Session 3 – Practical Aspects of Contraception – including diaphragm and implant fitting
Session 4 – Young people; Consent, Confidentiality, Fraser Guidelines and Safeguarding children
Session 5 – Managing Sensitive Scenarios – dealing with unwanted pregnancy, psycho sexual problems and referral for sterilisation.

How is it assessed? There are 9 assessment criteria in which you must demonstrate active and appropriate participation in all the sessions.

How do I access a C5? A list of local contact details is available from the Faculty website.

How much does it cost? The courses are costed locally and will vary according to set up.

Where can I get more information? For full details visit the Faculty website training section

I am a nurse – can I do the Course? The simple answer is yes, but it may depend where you live and who is organising C5 in your area. Nurses cannot gain the Faculty diploma but can do the e-SRH sessions and C5. In some areas nurses are using this to access training in SRH and some clinics may then be happy to offer clinical assessment too.

Review of the year 2011

6 Jan, 12 | by shellraine, e-Media Editor

It has been a busy and eventful year in sexual and reproductive health:

January

saw the launch of the new-look Journal of Family Planning & Reproductive Health Care as it joined the BMJ family. Readers will have noticed many improvements, not least the website and early online publishing.

February

The joint Faculty / e-Learning for Health, e-SRH, was named winner in the e-Government National Award: excellence, Learning & Skills section (now renamed UK Public Sector Digital Awards)

March saw the MDU statement: GPs need suitable training to fit contraceptive implants

April saw the Faculty response to EC being made available through pharmacies in Wales

May saw the publication of the new Missed Pill Recommendations

June

saw Chris Wilkinson become the newly elected President of the Faculty and in
July his appoinment was acknowledged in BMA News


August

saw the publication of the Emergency Contraception Guidelines



September
saw the publication of the amended Drug Interactions with Hormonal Contraception and the launch of this Blog !!

October saw the publication of the Combined Hormonal Contraception Guidelines as the world population broke the 7 billion mark.

November
saw the CEU being awarded NHS Accreditation for its guidelines and the publication of the Service Standards for SRH

December
saw the 23rd World AIDS Day with the theme: Getting to Zero

And so to 2012 – wishing all our readers a Happy New Year

Around the Globe

13 Oct, 11 | by shellraine, e-Media Editor

The latest edition of the American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology includes a supplement entitled: A Hormonal Contraception Update: A Decade of Innovation & Transformation.

In addition AJOG published (online 11th July 2011) a study on the impact of long-acting reversible contraception on return for repeat abortion by Rose S B and Lawton B A. The objective of the study was to determine the rate of return for repeat abortion in relation to postabortion contraceptive method choice 24 months onward from an intervention study.  Its conclusion states: “This study provides strong support for the promotion of immediate postabortion access to LARC methods (particularly intrauterine devices) to prevent repeat abortion.”

September saw the European Society of Contraception (ESC) hold its 11th Seminar in Kaunas, Lithuania. One of the most notable features was the number of participants for a regional symposium  – 533, with the majority being from Poland and Latvia. A number of our colleagues from the UK were involved in either presentations or workshops: Dr Sarah Randall, Dr Anne Webb and Dr Simone Reuter. In addition there was a Board of Directors’ meeting which involved the 2 UK representatives, Dr Meera Kishen and Shelley Mehigan.

Kaunas itself was fascinating for its combination of old and new: elements left over from its communist-dominated past with many crumbling, abandoned buildings and its, especially young, people who are trying to adapt to a new world with western influences. This was particularly evident in the apparent twin obsessions of pizza and eating outside – as well as this may work if the pizzas are made in the Italian way and the cafes are in the Mediterranean it suffers a little in translation to a chilly Baltic state with locally made fare.  This was partly corrected by an apparent benefit to the local blanket industry!

The next full Congress will be in Athens in June 2012.

Meanwhile at home:

Have you completed elements of the new DFSRH: e-SRH; Course of 5; Clinical Exerience and Assessment; e-Portfolio or the LoC SDI or IUT? The Faculty would like to hear from you. They have commissioned an independent review by Professor Ed Piele of the University of Warwick. Visit the Faculty website to give your feedback on your experiences.

UK Agony Aunts bed-in to make sexual health a priority -

What would be the correct, collective noun for a group of agony aunts?

Well in this case it could be a ‘bedful’ or maybe a ‘boudoir’ as 8 of the UKs finest gather to add their support to a group of sexual health charities – Brook, FPA (Family Planning Association), Terrence Higgins Trust, and MedFASH – calling on the government to protect sexual health services as many have seen reduced funding lead to cuts in vital services. This at a time when:
i) a survey by Brook confirms that only 6% of children learn the facts of life from their parents – the internet, TV and friends being the usual source of information (sometimes misinformation) and
ii) the House of Lords HIV and Aids Select Committee report last month found efforts to control the spread of HIV are woefully inadequate as £2.9m is spent on prevention compared with £762m on treatment.

Fiction Book Reviews

Have you enjoyed reading the fiction book reviews in the Journal? Did you agree with the reviews this time of The Room by Emma Donaghue and The Hand That First Held Mine by Maggie O’Farrell? The book for January 2012 will be Pain of Death by Adam Creed (Faber & Faber).

From the Journal – October 2011 issue

6 Oct, 11 | by shellraine, e-Media Editor

The newly published Journal includes a number of articles related to abortion: a book review; a commentary on medical abortion in Ethiopia – for which there is also a podcast; an Israeli view of the status of a foetus; HIV testing in clinics and repeat attendance in Britain.

In addition there is a profile of FIAPAC, the international organisation for abortion providers who have their next biennial Congress in Edinburgh in October 2012.

In Letters to the Editor there is continuing correspondence discussing the emotive subject of the use of cervical analgesia for IUD/IUS fitting which seems to have polarised opinion more than any other issue for some time.

The printed journal was accompanied by the most recently published Faculty Guidance on Emergency Contraception (2011), available electronically from: http://www.fsrh.org/pdfs/CEUguidanceEmergencyContraception11.pdf. This updates the previous guidance from 2006, includes the new oral preparation, ulipristal acetate, a progesterone receptor modulator licensed for use up to 5 days after unprotected sex and refers to the guidance for Quick Starting Contraception (2010) which details how to ‘quick start’ after use of emergency contraception.

This Guidance follows neatly on from the CEU Statement on Missed Pill Recommendations (May 2011), which accompanied the last edition of the Journal which also included a commentary by Dr Diana Mansour; Revision of the ‘missed pill’ rules, which details the background to the changes.  The statement was published after the MHRA asked the Faculty Clinical Effectiveness Unit to review its previous guidance (2005), with a view to producing harmonised guidance. This the CEU subsequently did and the new guidance has been endorsed and adopted by the MHRA, fpa and BNF although unfortunately not by the pharmaceutical industry.

BNF 62 includes the amended instructions for starting and switching combined hormonal contraception to take into account the above recommendations.  Continuing the initiative of working closely with the Clinical Effectiveness Committee the BNF section on Contraception (7.3) is up to date and in line with FSRH guidance. This makes it an accurate resource particularly for GPs and Practice Nurses who use it more than any other group of clinicians.

CD ROMs

The latest Faculty Presidents Newsletter, which also accompanied the print journal, highlights the need for all services and clinicians to dispose of and not use any of the old training CD ROMs for IUDs, implants and EC. Trainees should only use the up-to-date training modules from the e-learning website: www.e-lfh.org.uk.

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