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Public Health

FSRH nominated for UK Sexual Health Award

15 Jan, 14 | by shellraine, e-Media Editor

SH awards

 

 

 

The FSRH Quality Training Project has been nominated in the ‘Adult Sexual Health Service/Project of the Year’ category of this year’s Brook fpa awards. The shortlisted finalists were announced this week.

The Awards recognise outstanding people, projects, services, campaigns and media in sexual health.  Winners will be announced at a glittering awards dinner and ceremony in central London on Friday 14 March.

Other categories include: Sexual health professional of the year; Young person of the year; Young people’s sexual health service/project of the year; The Pamela Sheridan Sex and Relationships Education Award; Sexual health media campaign/storyline of the year; Rosemary Goodchild Award for excellence in sexual health journalism.

More details from Brook/fpa

NICE PGDs – Template & Baseline assessment tool

1 Oct, 13 | by shellraine, e-Media Editor

Two implementation tools have now been published to support the patient group directions NICE good practice guidance. These are available from the NICE website at the links below:

GPG 2 Patient group directions: baseline assessment tool

GPG 2 Patient group directions: template

Nominations open for the UK Sexual Health Awards 2014

30 Sep, 13 | by shellraine, e-Media Editor

The UK Sexual Health Awards recognise outstanding work in and around sexual health. If you know of any incredible people, projects, services, campaigns, storyline or article – we want to hear about them.

Whether you’re nominating yourself, the organisation you work for, someone you work with, or something that has been done by someone else; if you think it deserves to be recognised and celebrated – make a nomination now!

There are seven categories open for nomination:

  • Sexual health professional of the year
  • Young person of the year
  • Adult sexual health service/project of the year
  • Young people’s sexual health service/project of the year
  • The Pamela Sheridan sex and relationships education award – recognising good practice in education in schools
  • Sexual health media campaign/storyline of the year
  • Rosemary Goodchild Award for excellence in sexual health journalism.

All shortlisted finalists get a free ticket to the glittering awards dinner and ceremony on Friday 14 March 2014 at 8 Northumberland Avenue – a stunning venue in the centre of London, Trafalgar Square.

Visit the Awards website to find out more or contact awards@brook.org.uk

ESC – 13thCongress and call for applications for project funding

16 Sep, 13 | by shellraine, e-Media Editor

Mark your calendar:

28 till 31 May 2014
Lisbon, Portugal

First announcement

Check out the first announcement including:

  • programme overview: 8 workshops, 21 congress sessions, 2 debates…
  • abstract submission instructions (deadline 1 December 2013)
  • registration form

Register now

Please find here an overview of the registration fees.
You can now register through the online registration form

General information / Programme overviewCall for abstracts (deadline = 1st December 2013)/ Registration

ESC newsletter

Call for project or course applications

The ESC provides funding to support a project within Europe

The available budget for applications received between 1 August and 31 December 2013 is 30,000 euro. Applications should meet the following minimal conditions:

  • The applicant must be a paid-up ESC member
  • The grant may be used to support an individual, group, institute or organisation with a project related to the aims of the ESC.
  • Examples of projects include: research, audit, review, needs assessment

Deadline for the application period:  31 December 2013

Application Form

 

 

World Contraception Day – 26 September 2013

16 Sep, 13 | by shellraine, e-Media Editor

WCD will be using an umbrella theme for this and future years: ‘Its your life; its your future’. This theme has been chosen as it is forward-looking, positive and empowering.

There are 3 sub-themes:

Your options: where young people can learn about all the contraceptive options available, using a reliable, unbiased source of information.

Your future:  understanding how unplanned pregnancies can happen and how the body changes during puberty

Your partner: learning to talk to your partner about contraception and how to build a trusting relationship based on reliable information

Organisations may choose whether to concentrate on one theme per year or cover all or some of the subjects this year.

A selection of materials are available in the form of a modular toolbox addressing each theme with background information and info graphics. Social media will be used more widely this year and suggested topics for Twitter and Facebook will be made available. There is also a countdown clock.

Campaign materials are available here: http://bit.ly/WCD2013

 

 

 

 

NICE Good Practice Guidance: Patient Group Directions

2 Aug, 13 | by shellraine, e-Media Editor

The Good Practice Guidance for Patient Group Directions has been published today. Better late than never!

This guidance provides good practice recommendations for individual people and organisations involved with PGDs, with the aim of ensuring patients receive safe and appropriate care and timely access to medicines, in line with legislation.

The preferred way for patients to receive the medicines they need is for a prescriber to provide care for an individual patient on a one-to-one basis. Historically, a doctor (or dentist) would prescribe a medicine(s) for an individual patient. A pharmacist (or dispensing doctor) would then dispense the medicine against the prescription and supply the medicine(s) to the patient.

This traditional ‘medical model’ changed in the years after publication of the final Crown report Review of prescribing, supply and administration of medicines in 1999. Legal frameworks were developed that have allowed services to be redesigned and health professionals to work more flexibly for the benefit of patients. As a result of these changes, there are now several legal options for supplying and/or administering medicines, including Patient Group Directions (PGDs).

PGDs provide a legal framework that allows some registered health professionals to supply and/or administer a specified medicine(s) to a pre defined group of patients, without them having to see a doctor (or dentist). However, supplying and/or administering medicines under PGDs should be reserved for situations in which this offers an advantage for patient care, without compromising patient safety.

Legislation establishing PGDs was introduced in 2000 and the Health Service Circular (HSC 2000/026) provided additional guidance. The current legislation for PGDs is included in The Human Medicines Regulations 2012.

This guidance is written in the context of the NHS in England, including independent organisations or contractors who are commissioned to provide NHS services. It may also be applicable to individual people and organisations delivering non-NHS healthcare services, and to some of the devolved administrations.

The guidance can be found here.

 

 

Fall in abortion rate and other news

15 Jul, 13 | by shellraine, e-Media Editor

Fall in abortion rates continues

Abortions carried out on women living in England and Wales fell 2.5% to 185,122 last year, Department of Health figures show.

For women aged 15-44, the abortion rate was down 5.4% to 16.5 per 1,000 women – the lowest since 1997.
From information included in abortion forms in 2012, almost half were medically-induced using drugs as opposed to surgery – similar to 2011.
Among under-18s, the abortion rate continued to fall last year.
The number of teenagers having abortions has been on a downward trend for the past five years. Between 2011 and 2012, the under-18 abortion rate fell again from 15 to 12.8 per 1,000.
The Department of Health report on the 2012 statistics said that 91% of abortions were carried out before the 13th week of pregnancy.
It also noted that fewer abortions were carried out on women from other countries, such as Ireland, than in any year since 1969.
Last year, non-residents accounted for 5,850 abortions.

The British Pregnancy Advisory Service (BPAS) said the drop in the number of teenagers experiencing an unwanted pregnancy could reflect improvements in access to contraception for young people.

In older age groups the fall in abortions could indicate that women are better able to avoid unplanned pregnancy in the first place, it said.

DH publishes “Integrated Sexual Health Services : National Service Specification”

This national service specification is provided to help local authorities to commission effective,high-quality, integrated sexual health care . It covers the rationale for commissioning effective and easy to access services and the objectives of service provision, key outcomes to consider, a description of what should be offered at various levels of service, professional and other quality standards covering sexual health, and the need to work in partnership with other services such as termination of pregnancy, general practice, and mental health services.

National curriculum review

From February to April a public consultation on the government’s proposal for the reform of the national curriculum in England was launched. The DfE has published the consultation report and government response. Having considered the responses to the consultation the government has published updated versions of the national curriculum framework and is now seeking feedback on this – deadline 8th August.

Responding to the publication Jules Hillier, Brook’s Deputy Chief Executive, said:

“Brook welcomes the inclusion of compulsory sex and relationships education in the National Curriculum, which means that secondary schools must provide young people with the education we know they very much want and need. It’s now up to schools to put this policy into action by ensuring that all children and young people are given high-quality SRE that puts young people at its heart. Getting this right will contribute to young people’s wider health and wellbeing and help them prepare for safe healthy, happy relationships. We look forward to supporting schools to do this.”

 PRAC recommendation on Diane 35 and generics

The European Medicines Agency’s Pharmacovigilance Risk Assessment Committee (PRAC) has concluded that the benefits of Diane 35 (cyproterone acetate 2 mg / ethinylestradiol 35 micrograms) and its generics outweigh the risks in a specific patient group, provided that several measures are taken to minimise the risk of thromboembolism, including new contraindications and warnings.

The Committee adopted the recommendation following a thorough review in which it sought expert advice and considered feedback from healthcare professionals and users of these medicines.

 

July Journal published as Impact Factor soars to 2.1!

20 Jun, 13 | by shellraine, e-Media Editor

The July edition of the Journal is now available online and includes:

Venous thromboembolism and COCs: an ongoing saga

This ongoing controversy recently resulted in the decision of the French authorities to withdraw the combined oral contraceptive (COC) containing ethinylestradiol (EE) and cyproterone acetate (i.e. Diane 35®) from the market. This consensus statement from 26 international experts in contraception concludes that “Both epidemiological data and clinical trials must be taken into account when best practice is defined. Regulatory restrictions of previously registered methods should only be made after careful assessment of all the available evidence”. See page 156

Serum CA125 for ovarian cancer screening

This timely commentary raises questions about the widespread use of screening women with non-specific symptoms by measuring serum CA125 levels, following the publication of the NICE guideline on ovarian cancer in 2012. The authors acknowledge that there are barriers that prevent women with symptoms associated with ovarian cancer from presenting to their general practitioner. However, the authors also point out that this will lead to increased use of CA125 in general practice and raise concerns about how women with raised CA125 in the absence of evidence of any disease should be managed. See page 160

Ovarian cancer symptom awareness and help-seeking behaviour

Ovarian cancer symptom awareness is low in the UK, and varies widely between symptoms. In this study, Low et al. identify variables that may be implicated in a longer time to help-seeking for possible ovarian cancer symptoms, and highlights the need for more in-depth research into the factors related to time to help-seeking in real-world situations. See page 163

Fertility preservation decisions faced by women with breast cancer

This article presents a contemporary summary of fertility preservation techniques available to women of reproductive age with breast cancer. It offers unique insights into the difficult treatment decisions coupled with the difficult fertility preservation treatment decisions that these women face. The article highlights a number of themes that influence the decision-making process for these women. Egg and embryo banking appear to be the fertility preservation treatment of choice. Finally, this work may assist health care commissioners when deciding funding priorities within a health economy such as the NHS in the UK. See page 172

Correlates of unprotected sex in drug-injecting women

This study demonstrates that despite the high risk for HIV acquisition or transmission and unintended pregnancy, condom use among women who inject illicit drugs or who have sexual partners who inject drugs in St Petersburg in Russia is low. Programmes to investigate and improve contraceptive use, including condoms, among this vulnerable group of women are needed and might benefit from addressing alcohol misuse. See page 179

Contraception in a university environment

This is a very simple real-life observational study of a cohort of young, nulliparous women in a university-based general practice choosing and continuing with long-acting reversible contraceptive methods (LARCs) as their first line method of contraception. This article urges the health professional reader to consider offering this ‘fit and forget’ method of contraceptive to our younger population as a matter of routine. See page 186

Impact of UKMEC on CHC prescribing

Briggs et al. have assessed the effect of the UKMEC on prescribing of combined hormonal contraceptives (CHCs). Sadly, although there has been a small decrease in the proportion of higher-risk women being prescribed CHCs, their results suggest that in 2010 7.3% of CHC users had UKMEC Category 3 or 4 risk factors, particularly BMI ≥35 kg/m2. The authors point out that it is likely many of these women were being placed at an unnecessarily high risk of cardiovascular events, given the availability of lower-risk alternatives. See page 190

Financial cost to patients of a suspected ectopic pregnancy

In this article, Unger and colleagues in Edinburgh report on their assessment of an area of patient experience that is not often considered when assessing medical interventions. The financial impact on patients’ lives of the need to seek medical attention can be considerable and may become more significant as economic hardship increases. This article describes a well-conducted questionnaire study on the costs that patients themselves incurred in attending their general practitioners and a hospital clinic with a suspected ectopic pregnancy. The authors argue that such costs need to be factored into decisions regarding the cost-effectiveness of medical procedures. See page 197

Emergency contraception algorithm based on risk assessment

Introduction of a standardised protocol for the provision of emergency contraception (EC) has significantly increased the proportion of women offered an intrauterine device (IUD) as postcoital contraception, particularly in women at high risk of conception. Introduction of ulipristal acetate as an alternative method of EC has resulted in a reduction in the uptake of the emergency IUD. McKay and Gilbert state that this is cause for concern, and further investigation into the reasons behind this decrease in IUD uptake is needed. See page 201

No need for water torture

Cameron and colleagues set out to answer a simple question, namely does a full bladder assist insertion of intrauterine contraception? In the world of assisted conception a full bladder had been shown to aid intrauterine catheter insertion for embryo transfer, but could this knowledge be transferred usefully to the world of contraception? This simple question was answered in a simple and elegant way with a properly constructed and conducted randomised trial, which showed that we needn’t ask our clients requesting IUD/IUS insertion to arrive bursting – a fact for which both they and clinic staff will be duly grateful. See page 207

New monophasic natural estradiol COC

Lee Shulman reviews a new monophasic natural estradiol COC, Zoely®. This COC benefits from the progestogen nomegestrol acetate (NOMAC), which appears to result in good cycle control, with a 24/4 regimen. Since it is monophasic, it also has potential for extended cycle use. The great hope is that natural estradiol COCs will have a lower risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE) than EE-containing pills, but it should be stressed that there is currently no actual evidence for this. Studies are ongoing, but at present these COCs should be treated just like any other from the point of view of VTE. See page 211

Brook/FPA UK Sexual Health Awards 2013

The Journal’s Consumer Correspondent writes about the recently awarded Brook/FPA UK Sexual Health Awards, and opines that awards of this type are a good thing for the SRH profession generally and so rightly should be regarded as a highlight of the sexual health year. See page 219

Plus

An obituary for Dr Alison Bigrigg by Dr Audrey Brown; an organisational factfile on Tommys; a conference report from the FSRH Annual Scientific Meeting at University of Warwick;

And last, but by no means least, the Journal Impact Factor has risen, once again, to 2.1. Many congratulations to Anne Szarewski and her team.

 

GUNA Summer Meeting

17 Jun, 13 | by shellraine, e-Media Editor

GUNA

 

GUNA Summer Clinical Meeting – Shaping Best Practice

 

GUNA is holding its summer meeting on 28th June at Jury’s Inn Hotel, Islington.

The GUNA summer clinical meeting for 2013 is being held on Friday 28th June and focuses on ‘Shaping Best Practice.’ Bringing together some of the UK’s most renowned sexual health practitioners, policy makers and service providers, the meeting will explore the latest themes and current topics, providing a clinical update and new perspective for delegates working in the area of sexual health, HIV and contraception. The programme includes:

‘New’ NHS in England – overview of the landscape’ – Leela Barham, Policy Advisor, RCN

Antibiotic resistance in Neiseeria gonorrhoea – Michelle Cole, Healthcare Scientist, Health Protection Agency

Men might be from mars … but are they also the elephant in the room: considering outcomes of poor male engagement with sexual health – Dr David Evans, Senior Lecturer Greenwich University

Copenhagen Impressions

3 Jun, 13 | by shellraine, e-Media Editor

European Society of Contraception and Reproductive Health
First Global Conference

Global

Highlights of the Congress included:

Crown Princess Mary opening the Congress followed by the amazing Copenhagen drummers                          drummers

 

 

 

Green contraception – estrogen in water an issue, rating methods for their ‘greenness’: hormones, packaging etc.

Lidegaard / Shulman / Dinger – continuing debate on VTE, interpreting research, epidemiology and practical applications.

Emergency Contraception – confirmation that pills have no impact globally on unintended pregnancy rates only IUDs do.

Meeting friends, old and new, from wider across the globe than usual, especially from the Baltic states, Africa and the Far East.

In addition the Board voted to set up a working group to investigate and promote multidisciplinary working across Europe.

bella sky

The startling Bella Sky hotel & conference centre

- especially the, trompe l’oeil, walkway between the 2 towers on the 23rd floor. It goes uphill from Tower 1 to 2 but from a distance appears to go the other way.

 

 

oresund  The Oresund Bridge

- the 5 mile rail and road link between Copenhagen and Malmo

 

 

 

bikesBicycles, bicycles and more bicycles

and particularly proper, separate, dedicated cycle lanes – at times quite scary and felt like being in the middle of the Tour de France peloton without the lycra and wrap-around shades!,

Great open sandwiches (smorrebrod) but hardly any danish pastries.

Herrrings, steak & frites. Not brilliant for veggies.

Good beer but not wine – used by next years hosts in Lisbon as an enticement to go there.

Lisbon

 

 

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