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People in IP

Alison Baker-Lewton | People in Injury Prevention

14 Aug, 17 | by Sheree Bekker

[Sheree Bekker] In the lead up to the 13th Australasian Injury Prevention and Safety Promotion Conference, I invited keynote speaker Dr Alison Baker-Lewton to answer a few questions for our blog.

Alison Baker-Lewton is a Senior Lecturer in Social Pedagogy in the College of Arts and Education at Victoria University in Melbourne. She received her PhD in Psychology in the Public Interest (Community Psychology) at North Carolina State University. Her research draws on critical community psychology, public health and education to explore how inequality impacts young people from marginalized backgrounds, focusing on social identities, sense of belonging and health and well-being. This research has focused on the contexts and ecologies of young people’s lives, including neighborhoods, schools and local arts and sports programs.

Over the past several years a significant part of her research has examined racialisation as a form of structural violence and its impact on young people in Australia. This has included experiences of both adults and young people of African background who have come to Australia as migrants/refugees, drawing attention to the role of settings and activities (i.e. sports, alternative education, community-based arts) as well as the symbolic resources deployed in the development of identity, belonging, and social action. In her research she has mobilised critical race theories and liberation psychology to map empowered community responses and narratives of resistance. Using visual and sound research methodologies, this work has explored possibilities for social change and activism through public and community pedagogies.

Tell us about your training and role in public health

My training and PhD were in the sub-discipline of community psychology, which is explicitly committed to promoting empowerment and takes a strengths-based approach to working with communities towards individual and collective wellbeing. The discipline emphasises a collaborative approach to working with diverse groups and communities to leverage resources and develop strategies to transform oppressive social environments. My experience in public health has been closely tied to Community-Based Participatory Research (CBPR) approaches, specifically using creative and arts-based research with young people to explore social issues related to their lives.

What is your research focused on, and what do you see as the issues currently facing public health?

My current research projects are focused on the use of community-based arts as a catalyst for community and civic engagement among young people from underrepresented groups. One strand of this research focuses on young people’s experiences of racialisation and the implications for identity and belonging across contexts. I am especially interested in blending creative research methodologies and documentary techniques to develop young people’s sense of social justice and capacity for action. Most recently this has been in collaboration with young African-Australian women to explore topics such as misrepresentation in the media, mental health and hair and cultural identity.

How does your research Take Action?

My research with young people aims to take action by bringing their voices to a broader audience, which can challenge negative stereotypes and facilitate dialogue about the issues they face in their lives.

In the academy, we have been taking action in writing about whose knowledge is valued and what constitutes knowledge. Often, collaborative community research that uses arts or cultural practice is not understood as empirical evidence, however, we have been pushing the idea of inclusive knowledges as a way to democratise research.

What can emerging researchers learn from you? 

That doing research with communities requires us to think critically about ourselves, our position and privilege, and to even challenge some of the things we are taught as fledgling academics.

What are you looking forward to most about your upcoming trip to Ballarat?

I haven’t been back to Ballarat for a proper visit since I was 7 years old! I remember mining for gold with a little pan, but coming up empty handed. I’m looking forward to coming back to see how much Ballarat has changed.

 

Earlybird registration for the  13th Australasian Injury Prevention and Safety Promotion Conference is now open! 

 

Lynne Moore | People in Injury Prevention

20 Jul, 17 | by Sheree Bekker

[Sheree Bekker] In the lead up to the 13th Australasian Injury Prevention and Safety Promotion Conference, I invited keynote speaker Associate Professor Lynne Moore to answer a few questions for our blog.

Lynne Moore is an associate professor of epidemiology and biostatistics at the department of social and preventative medicine, Laval University in Québec City. She is recipient of a research career award and a CIHR Foundation grant, holds or shares over 10.1$m in research grants, and has published 140 peer-reviewed papers over her research career. Her research interests are in improving the quality of acute injury care. She has led the development, validation, implementation, and evaluation of a comprehensive quality tool assessment for acute injury care which has been implemented across Canada. She is co-leader of the International Injury Care Improvement Initiative.

1. Tell us about your training and role in public health/injury prevention.

I have a PhD in epidemiology and biostatistics and have been involved in injury research since 2001. I currently work in close collaboration with our provincial health quality assurance organisation on the evaluation and improvement of trauma systems.

 

2. What is your research focused on, and what do you see as the issues currently facing public health/injury prevention?

I focus on solutions to getting the right patient to the right place at the right time and delivering appropriate care. My current research projects have three main goals: 1) identifying determinants of inter-provider variations in resource use intensity related to injury care, 2) reducing the use of low-value clinical practices, and 3) improving our understanding of the components of trauma systems that drive optimal patient outcomes. I think that developing optimal trauma systems with available resources in low and middle income countries represents one of the most important global challenges in injury care.

 

3. How does your research Take Action?

Quality indicators developed through my research program have been used to evaluate injury care quality across Canada and have led to improvements in injury mortality and resource utilisation.

 

4. What can emerging researchers learn from you?

That injury research is a fantastic research field to be working in! Compared to many other fields such as cancer and cardiovascular diseases, injury research is in its infancy and therefore presents extremely fertile ground for dynamic, young researchers. Most importantly, it has the potential to make a huge difference in terms of saving healthy, productive life years.

 

5. What are you looking forward to most about your upcoming trip to Ballarat, Australia?

This is my first trip to Australia! I’m spending a month with Belinda Gabbe’s research team as part of my sabbatical. I’m really excited about this opportunity to meet with prestigious colleagues and discover a part of the world that I’ve been longing to visit since I was a child.

 

Earlybird registration for the  13th Australasian Injury Prevention and Safety Promotion Conference is now open! 

 

Ioni Lewis | People in Injury Prevention

3 May, 17 | by Sheree Bekker

[Sheree Bekker] In the lead up to the 13th Australasian Injury Prevention and Safety Promotion Conference, I invited keynote speaker Dr Ioni Lewis to answer a few questions for our blog.

Dr Ioni Lewis has 15 years’ experience in road safety and traffic psychology research. She is based at the Queensland University of Technology’s (QUT) Centre for Accident Research and Road Safety – Queensland (CARRS-Q) where she is currently a Senior Research Fellow. Ioni’s expertise is in the development and evaluation of road safety advertising messages, drawing upon social psychological perspectives. She has led the development of an innovative conceptual framework, The Step approach to Message Design and Testing (SatMDT) which she has applied in relation to the development and evaluation of road safety campaigns addressing high risk behaviours. Ioni has an extensive publication record comprising peer-reviewed journals, peer-reviewed full papers and abstracts for conferences, as well as reports for Government and Industry. Ioni has received invitations to present at international and national forums. In 2015, she was invited to the USA to consult on the development and evaluation of a large-scale National Driver Safety Education Campaign funded by the National Safety Council. In 2014, she was invited to present on health communications for injury prevention at the Center for Disease Control (CDC) in Atlanta, Georgia. Ioni was the developer and Chair of the Organising Committee for the inaugural Australasian Symposium of Health Communication, Advertising and Marketing (Health CAM) in 2014. The Symposium, the only one of its kind to be dedicated to Health Communications in Australasia, featured international and national experts as guest speakers. Ioni was also Chair of the Scientific Committee of the 2015 Australasian Road Safety Conference (ARSC).

1. Tell us about your training and role in injury prevention

I have been working in the field of injury prevention research, and specifically in the area of road safety and traffic psychology, since 2002 when I commenced my Honours at the Centre for Accident Research and Road Safety – Queensland (CARRS-Q), Queensland University of Technology (QUT). Currently, I am a Senior Research Fellow at CARRS-Q. My background (undergraduate and Honours) is in Psychology with my PhD in Social Psychology/Traffic Psychology.

2. What is your research focused on, and what do you see as the issues currently facing injury prevention?

In my research, I develop and evaluate injury prevention messaging for public education campaigns. Much of my work has been in the area of road safety advertising; however, I have been involved in the development of campaigns addressing injury prevention issues more broadly (e.g., baby slings). The changing communication landscape (towards more online and digital communications) has meant that, potentially more so than ever, there is a crucial need to ensure not only that ‘we get the message content right’ but that we also ‘get the communication channel/medium right”.

3. How does your research Take Action?

I think that my area of research is very much about ‘taking action’. Public education and communication campaigns focused on achieving social and behaviour change play an important role in helping to improve the quality and longevity of individuals’ lives.

4. What can emerging researchers learn from you?

As a researcher, I am a strong advocate for the value of theory in informing what we do and thus evidence-based practice. When our research is guided by theory, we gain greater insights into why a particular message approach did or did not work as intended.

5. Have you ever been to Ballarat/Australia and have a great story to tell? Or, what are you looking forward to most about your upcoming trip to Ballarat/Australia?

I have only visited Ballarat once in my life so I am keen to return – am very much looking forward to attending the AIPN conference in Ballarat!

 

 

Kathrin Steffen | People in Injury Prevention

24 Apr, 17 | by Sheree Bekker

[Sheree Bekker] In the lead up to the 13th Australasian Injury Prevention and Safety Promotion Conference, I invited keynote speaker Dr Kathrin Steffen to answer a few questions for our blog.

Kathrin Steffen is a senior researcher from the Oslo Sports Trauma Research Center. Kathrin also serves as a research assistant at the Department of Medical & Scientific Activities in the International Olympic Committee (IOC). She is the assistant editor for the 4 annual issues of the IOC supported journal British Journal of Sports Medicine Injury Prevention & Health Protection, in addition to being involved in other IOC driven research projects.

1. Tell us about your training and role in injury prevention
After finishing my Masters studies in Germany (German Sports University in Cologne), in the field of prevention and management of noncommunicable diseases, I moved on to Norway and the Norwegian School of Sport Sciences and the Oslo Sports Trauma Research Center, where I earned a PhD in sports injury epidemiology. Another positive addition to my development was a 1-yr post-doc exchange with the group of Prof Carolyn Emery at the Sports Injury Prevention Research Centre in Calgary. The value of an intercultural exchange cannot be stressed enough.

2. What is your research focused on, and what do you see as the issues currently facing injury prevention?
Besides my research interests in injury epidemiology and prevention in the broader sports community, I am the project leader for national and international multimedia projects to disseminate knowledge in sports medicine. At present, I am working full time with the content management for a multi-lingual “SKADEFRI/GET SET – webpage/mobile application” on injuries and injury prevention in Olympic sports.
One of the biggest challenges in our field of injury prevention seems to be is to convince people that “the pill” is good for them. As one example, we have evidence enough that structured conditioning training/neuromuscular training, focussing on sport specific injury types, will reduce the risk of injury providing training is done regularly. However, we still see a high number of injuries in the field. Having developed digital tools in corporation with coaches, athletes, and sports federations to facilitate usage of prevention exercises, we still don’t see the desired adoption of these tools. The knowledge doesn’t seem to be translated well enough, and mechanisms on how best to translate are not optimally understood.

3. How does your research Take Action?
The Oslo Sports Trauma Research Center has a special focus on the young athlete, though many of the research projects are done in elite sports. Much of the knowledge gained from elite athletes can easily be transferred to, and shared with, recreational sports. Also, we have a close contact to the National Sports Federations, and we collaborate on developing injury prevention materials to be mandatory in the coach education system. The development of multimedia tools (web and apps) helps to facilitate the usage of existing knowledge in the field. However, the validation of these tools still remains a challenge in Norway.

4. What can emerging researchers learn from you?
Don´t be afraid of leaving your group and go abroad to further develop personal and research skills.

5. What are you looking forward to when coming to Ballarat?
The ACRISP-group with their head, Prof Caroline Finch, are world leading in the field of implementation research. I’m looking forward to the exchange experiences and learning from each other, through expected cultural differences and similarities.

 

The call for abstracts for the 13th Australasian Injury Prevention and Safety Promotion Conference is open until the end of April 2017. 

Andrea Gielen | People in injury prevention

21 Mar, 17 | by Sheree Bekker

[Sheree Bekker] In the lead up to the 13th Australasian Injury Prevention and Safety Promotion Conference, I invited keynote speaker Professor Andrea Gielen to answer a few questions for our blog.

Andrea C. Gielen, ScD, ScM is Professor and Director of the Johns Hopkins Center for Injury Research and Policy at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. This Center is home to a large and multidisciplinary faculty that conducts research, trains students, and supports research translation and practice partnerships. Dr. Gielen is a behavioral scientist with decades of experience as a public health department practitioner and as an academic researcher whose focus is on behavioral intervention trials. Currently, her work focuses on community and clinic-based programs to reduce home injuries, pedestrian injuries, motor vehicle occupant injuries, prescription drug overdose, and domestic violence. Dr. Gielen received her ScM in 1979 and her ScD in 1989 from the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. She has received career awards from the American Public Health Association; the Centers for Disease Control; American Academy of Health Behavior; and the Elizabeth Fries Health Education Award.

  1. Tell us about your training and role in injury prevention

Most of my training is in behavioral sciences, health education, and injury prevention. I describe my role in injury prevention as a behavior change interventionist. Our team takes a comprehensive health promotion approach to behavior change, which means using innovative communication strategies, as well as incorporating policy and engineering solutions that make the safer behavior the easier (and when possible the default) behavior.

  1. What is your research focused on, and what do you see as the issues currently facing injury prevention?

My current research focuses on finding creative and evidence-based ways to reduce unintentional childhood injury, domestic violence, sexual assault on college campuses, and opioid overdose. The complexity of some of these problems is a challenge to injury prevention because there are so many different disciplines involved in the solutions. For instance, addressing the opioid epidemic requires perspectives from professionals in criminal justice, health policy, drug safety, etc.  On the other hand, the simplicity of some of the solutions is a challenge due to lack of societal and political will to implement them. For example, why are there still unsafe playgrounds in low income neighborhoods when we know how to make them safer? Why are there stark disparities in motor vehicle death rates across population groups when we know how to design safer roadways and enforce driving laws?

  1. How does your research Take Action?

At the Johns Hopkins Center for Injury Research and Policy, one of our goals is to “close the gap between research and practice” to reduce injury. Our outreach core focuses on creating and disseminating evidence about what works to prevent and reduce injury in myriad ways. We host a “translation symposium” that brings together researchers and practitioners; we published a guide for state policy makers that has been replicated in more than a dozen states; we support a children’s safety resource center program that provides free safety education and low cost safety products to families; and we convene stakeholders to produce and disseminate “state of the evidence” documents on various injury problems.

  1. What can emerging researchers learn from you? 

A dialogue between established researchers and students and junior researchers is essential to advancing the field. I find that extremely helpful in at least a couple of important ways. First, we “old-timers” can help make sure that our limited resources aren’t being used to “re-invent the wheel” — our historical perspective can help shape new solutions to both old and new problems. Second, younger folks can provide extraordinarily innovative ideas, drawing from the expertise with new technologies and their ability to have their “fingers on the pulse” of the new generations we seek to serve.

  1. Have you ever been to Australia and have a great story to tell? Or, what are you looking forward to most about your upcoming trip to Australia?

I have been to Australia several times and thoroughly enjoyed each trip. But, I have to say,  the most influential trip was the first one back in the 1990’s when I had a chance to visit the Royal Children’s Hospital in Melbourne and discovered their children’s safety resource center. This was a model that I was able to take back to the United States, and I’m proud to say we have implemented at Johns Hopkins Hospital. We also partnered with our local fire department to create a 40 foot truck version of your model! My husband and I also LOVED moreton bay bugs!!

 

The call for abstracts for the 13th Australasian Injury Prevention and Safety Promotion Conference is now open. 

Steve Marshall | People in injury prevention

9 Mar, 17 | by Sheree Bekker

[Sheree Bekker] In the lead up to the 13th Australasian Injury Prevention and Safety Promotion Conference, I have invited keynote speaker Professor Steve Marshall to answer a few questions for our blog.

Steve Marshall, PhD, is an injury epidemiologist.  He is the Director of the University of North Carolina (UNC) Injury Prevention Research Center. He is also a professor of epidemiology in UNC’s Gillings School of Global Public Health and faculty in UNC’s Matthew Gfeller Sports-Related Traumatic Brain Injury Center.  Dr. Marshall has 25 years of experience and over 250 research publications in the fields of epidemiology and injury control.  He serves on the Executive Committee of the SafeStates Alliance, the Board of Advisors for the Datalys Center for Sports Injury Research and Prevention, and on the National Steering Committee for the American Medical Society of Sports Medicine’s Collaborative Research Network. 

  1. Tell us about your training and role in injury prevention

Professional development is an on-going activity across one’s entire professional career. I first started learning about injury prevention in the early 1990s from a British biostatistician named Colin Cryer, who was a wonderful mentor. Around this time, I also learned a lot from working alongside John Langley, as part of his team at Injury Prevention Research Unit, University of Otago.  This was in Wellington and in Dunedin, New Zealand.

By the end of the 1990s I had earned a PhD in Epidemiology from the University of North Carolina (UNC) in the USA. Although my university education was complete, I still had a lot to learn about injury prevention from people outside the university, such as people who develop and deliver injury prevention programs, advocates in the community, injury survivors and their families, and lawyers and politicians.

As Director of the UNC Injury Prevention Research Center, my current role is to help create cutting-edge research, and ensure it is translated into concrete public health gains such as legislation and injury prevention programs.

  1. What do you see as the issues currently facing injury prevention?

The pressing challenge before injury prevention is simple: how can we achieve a real and sustained shift in society’s attitudes to injury and violence prevention as a whole. We need to achieve a lasting change in the structure of social systems that impact safety.  We need a sustained effort to understand the social structures that impact safety attitudes and safety decision-making, and a long-term strategy to change them. This action is, I believe, is part of the Take Action call for “systems for safer cities and stronger communities”.  Simply put, we need strategies that institutionalize safety as a core value in multiple ways within and between the plethora of social units (e.g. governments, hospitals, neighborhoods, families).

  1. What is your research focus, and how does your research Take Action?

In collaboration with our practice-focused partners, my center uses empowerment strategies to build community capacity in wide range of other areas, including road safety and  violence.  In collaboration with the North Carolina state health department, we provide injury prevention knowledge and skills to community-based organizations through the Injury Free NC Academy.

A lot of my career has focused on sports injury epidemiology.  When we started studying sports-related concussions in the early 2000s, the topic was largely invisible to the general sports community. Due to the efforts of many researchers, including our team, concussion is hot-button topic for the contact sports community. Strengthening the capacity of the sports community to address concussion is key to sustaining momentum and continuing to change the culture of sports to prevent concussion.

Professor Carolyn Emery from University of Calgary’s Sport Injury Prevention Research Centre reminds us that we are all participants in #concussion management #UNCTBI2017 pic.twitter.com/Acw9emDWPd Professor Carolyn Emery was speaking at the 4th Matthew Gfeller Sport-Related Neurotrauma Symposium on the UNC campus.

  1. What can emerging researchers learn from you?

Switch to building probes for exploring other solar systems.  It’s less frustrating and people at parties will think you are way cool.

  1. What are you looking forward to most about your upcoming trip to Australia?

I’m looking forwards to spending some time with the ACRISP (Australian Collaboration for Research into Injury in Sport and its Prevention) team at Federation University Australia. They are world leaders in focused strategies for sports injury prevention.

 

The call for abstracts for the 13th Australasian Injury Prevention and Safety Promotion Conference is now open. 

On career building: networking and mentoring

7 Dec, 15 | by Sheree Bekker

 

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(SB) Recently, Bridie Scott-Parker and I attended the 12th Australasian Injury Prevention and Safety Promotion Conference in Sydney Australia. We had never met before, yet Bridie and I have been working together both on the executive board of the Australian Injury Prevention Network (which hosted the conference along with The George Institute for Global Health), as well as here on the social media editorial team for Injury Prevention. I was, therefore, delighted to meet Bridie in person. It seems this has been a pattern in my own networking recently: online before in person, as I reflected here on cementing online networks and collaborations. Those of you who read this blog, and have perhaps followed my musings on other platforms, will know that I often wax lyrical about the power of social media for this purpose – particularly for postgraduates.

At the conference, as the student representative of the AIPN, I coordinated a discussion panel for student delegates. The panellists brought diverse points of view: full professors, early career researchers, practitioners, and PhD students (and not a manel in sight). This session was designed to be organic in nature, and evolved into a discussion largely around career paths, networking, mentoring, and also the ‘mess’ (or ‘dirt’ – inside joke for those that were there) of work-life balance.

It is often assumed that formal mentoring and networking are the cornerstones of career development advice for postgraduate students. Yes, these are important and should be formalised, especially for women. However, well-meaning advice often translates into flawed advice that negates the lived experiences of students themselves (particularly when those include experiences of structural inequality). Indeed, when I was planning the student panel session, and after talking to some fellow students, it became clear that generic mentoring and networking advice was not what students want to hear.

From my point of view, as a current PhD scholar, it was fascinating to see how willing more established researchers are to opening up and having honest conversations about the very same struggles and failures that we have – if they are only asked about them. Impostor syndrome, introversion, emotional work…holding space for vulnerable conversations about these topics made more of a difference for many of us than formal career advice ever will. It is so easy to forget that academics are humans too, and it is this personal side that students like me find encouraging to hear about.

In talking career pathways, it was encouraging to hear from panellists that a career is not a linear pathway. So often the stories we hear are of successful people who were ‘in the right place at the right time’, or ‘lucky’ that their careers evolved as they did. But in reality there were, in fact, clear and often difficult choices that panellists had made over the course of their careers. The importance of personal boundaries set in place from which career risks can then be taken, or moves that can then be professionally and/or personally made were mentioned by all panellists. We each have a guiding instinct as to where we want to go – trust it. Career paths are sideways and forwards and backwards and upwards and onwards  – and that is okay.

On the dreaded “networking!”: building a network is more about quality of connection than quantity. One new strong connection is better than a fistful of business cards. Yes, flattery will open up a conversation (top tip: don’t know how to initiate a conversation with an academic? Comment on their work! Even better if it is a favourable comment), however genuine conversation, and giving something back to others will sustain it. More often than not, people want to help other people – and are happy to do so. This may not need to be in the form of a formal mentor or networking connection – often one quick coffee together can be enough to impart valuable tacit knowledge.

As a personal note to other postgraduate students, it is well worth the effort to get involved in an executive board of an organisation, or a conference organising committee. The true value in any career building/mentoring/networking opportunity lies in adding value yourself. It has taken me a long time to figure this out. In my opinion, you will get more out of being useful and getting involved, than you ever will out of being given passive advice by others. How can you be useful? This does not need to be a grand gesture or even include a highly specialised skill – in my case, offering to do social media has been my easiest path to making myself useful. Prove yourself competent at something, no matter how small, and people will take notice.

The best mentoring/networking relationships lie not in a one-way give-and-take, but rather are two-way streets. The very best mentors and colleagues learn as much from students, as students learn from them. That is your gauge as to whether a professional relationship is worth the effort. I often think that emerging researchers can, and should, be more discerning as to who they choose to learn from. Also remember that it is good to have more than one mentor – people have skills in different areas, and not everyone can be everything to everyone. In our wide-eyed idealism we are often a little too keen to make every connection that we can into everything we can.

In this spirit of great connections, I have asked my ten-minute one-off networking-mentor Bridie Scott-Parker (I saw her great networking skills in action during a valuable ten-minute conversation at the conference) to add her perspective here as a panellist at the session.

(BSP) I have blogged previously on the importance of attending conferences, with one of the most beneficial aspects being the opportunity to network with others in the field. After chatting with Sheree – in person after many email and telephone conversations – I realised that the value in networking really lies in both parties having the chance to learn as they share different perspectives. In this respect no matter at what stage you are currently at in your injury prevention career someone can learn from you and you can learn from others. Network away!

For me, the conference panel was an opportunity to show students that life as an injury prevention researcher is not a bed of roses upon which you frolic with unicorns, rather that there is no one path that everyone will follow and that is okay. For me personally, the panel was also an opportunity for me to be kinder to myself, as you will be hard pressed to find a greater critic of me than myself. I became very ill during one of my undergraduate degrees, and I thought I would only ever be the ‘token disabled person’ in my classes and in any employment I ever achieved, if I could achieve any employment. I also had the double-whammy of juggling two small children – another great source of anxiety, as what the heck am I doing studying and trying to work, while juggling fun things like medication trials, when I should be focused on being Mum?

I think sharing a snapshot of some of the self-doubt I have felt, the relentless voice that tells me I am the equal opportunity person when I am not, and how I ended up in injury prevention after a long and winding road, and not just how I managed to succeed academically and in the increasingly-competitive domain of research, resonated with some of the students who may themselves be struggling with self-doubt, feeling like a failure as a Mum who cannot get any semblance of a work-life balance, and who cannot see any clear trajectory from where they have come from to where they aspire to be in the future. In many ways, that is the magic of life, but that phrase would have been cold-comfort to me as a stressed student! And that is okay.

(SB) Yes! I will repeat: academics are humans too.

 

Another colleague honoured: Gary Slutkin, Illinois Order of Lincoln

21 Apr, 15 | by Barry Pless

I found this posted somewhere online and wanted to share the good news with our readers.

“Gary Slutkin, M.D., Founder & Executive Director of Cure Violence, will be honored for his work as 2015 Recipient of the Illinois Order of Lincoln, the state’s highest honor for professional achievement and public service. The Order of Lincoln will be presented at the 51st Convocation of the Lincoln Academy of Illinois in the chambers of the Illinois House of Representatives in Springfield on Saturday, May 9, 2015. A gala reception and dinner in honor of the 2015 recipients will be held at the Abraham Lincoln Presidential Museum in Springfield.

“This year’s recipients of the Order of Lincoln have helped make Illinois and the world a better place,” Governor Rauner said. “The work they have accomplished is admirable, and it is our privilege to honor them. Mr. Lincoln would be proud.”

 

Workshop blog correction

2 Feb, 15 | by Bridie Scott-Parker

My apologies, it seems I need tuition in proof-reading! I mistakenly omitted Dr Ted Miller, Injury Prevention, as one of the Editors who will be leading the discussion at this great workshop.

Harborview Injury Prevention Research Centre has new director

15 May, 14 | by Barry Pless

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I just spotted this important announcement. I am not sure who preceded Fred Rivara as Director of this outstanding Injury Prevention Research Centre, but I do know he was followed by David Grossman and Beth Ebel. Now a new director has been named. As the announcement states, “Dr. Vavilala is Professor of Anesthesiology and Pediatrics and Adjunct Professor of Neurological Surgery and Radiology at the University of Washington. She received her undergraduate education from the University of Houston and her medical degree from University of Texas Medical School in Houston, Texas. She completed two residencies, her first in pediatrics at the University of Texas Medical School and the second in anesthesiology at the University of Washington. Dr. Vavilala is an expert in the care of injured patients, has authored over 150 peer reviewed publications related to injury, and is internationally known for her work in traumatic brain injury. As a 20 year faculty member in the UW School of Medicine, she has mentored over 27 fellows across UW, has current research support from the National Institute of Neurological Disease and Stroke, and is the co-director of the NICHD sponsored UW Pediatric Injury Training Program.”

Fred Rivara notes that “Dr. Vavilala is the first anesthesiologist in the nation to lead an injury research center and the only anesthesiologist on the Brain Trauma Foundation Guidelines working group pertaining to the acute care management of patients with severe traumatic brain injury. “

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