Traffic lights…robots…robocops?

The early twentieth-century intersection was a strange scene. While the world’s largest automobile manufacturer sold over 20,000 cars a month in 1914, horse-drawn wagons and carts still crowded the streets, and accidents became increasingly frequent. Intersections in major cities were congested, and traffic was directed by police officers who stood in the middle of chaotic […]

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Media and injury prevention

As an injury prevention researcher, I am often dismayed at the way in which injuries, risk, and injury prevention efforts are portrayed in the media. I clearly recall being disgusted as an idealistic teenager, having read a newspaper article regarding the untimely death of a peer who had been killed during a police chase. The […]

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Minimising dance injury through changing dance floors

As someone who has appreciated many dance performances (primarily as I have absolutely NO dancing ability or talent in any single speck of my body!), and as an injury prevention researcher and advocate, my interest was piqued by an article authored by Hopper, Alderson, Elliott, & Ackland recently published in the Journal of Science and […]

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More background on our blogging team

Blog 3: So today I wanted to share some more background on our blogging team. As an applied social psychologist, I find this information very interesting indeed! What excites you about being part of the Injury Prevention social media editorial team?   Sheree Bekker: The invaluable conversation that has sprung up around scholarly work through the […]

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More background on our new blogging team

Today I will share more about our blogging team members. Blog 2: Explain your injury prevention research and interests. Sheree Bekker: My research investigates safety promotion and injury prevention policy and practice within community sport in Australia. I have a particular interest in dissemination and social marketing. The overall purpose of my research is to allow […]

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Self-report versus observation

For various reasons ranging from cost to a lack of alternatives, self-report is a common data collection method. However, anyone who has used a self-report data collection method would be well aware of the limitations of this method. Limitations primarily focus on the accuracy of responses, and can include such considerations as an intentional reporting […]

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Friday 29 May in Australia is Fatality Free Friday

Tomorrow, Friday 29 May, is Fatality Free Friday down under. As noted on the website, Road safety is a complex issue but we believe that if drivers consciously think about road safety and safe driving for just one Friday in the year, that day’s toll – statistically about 5.3 deaths – could be reduced to […]

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Injury prevention and Indigenous Australians

Yesterday I came across a report which estimated the fatal burden of disease and injury for Indigenous Australians. Included were estimates of the magnitude of the fatal burden ‘gap’ between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians. The Burden of Disease Study: Fatal burden of disease in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people 2010 report includes fatal burden calculations in […]

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World Health Day 2015

In case you didn’t know, today, the 7th of April, is World Health Day 2015. As can be read on the World Health Organization website, WHO hopes to highlight the challenges and opportunities associated with food safety under the slogan “From farm to plate, make food safe.” “Food production has been industrialized and its trade […]

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