Injury prevention and Indigenous Australians

Yesterday I came across a report which estimated the fatal burden of disease and injury for Indigenous Australians. Included were estimates of the magnitude of the fatal burden ‘gap’ between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians. The Burden of Disease Study: Fatal burden of disease in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people 2010 report includes fatal burden calculations in […]

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Controversial ad during US Super Bowl broadcast

American football’s championship game, the Super Bowl, was played last Sunday (those of us based in Seattle would rather not dwell on the result). The game was the most watched telecast in U.S. history, with an estimated 114.4 million viewers. Not surprisingly, this huge audience is an advertising jackpot – the revenue from this year’s game exceeded 330 million U.S. dollars. An […]

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SAVIR 2015 Workshop

The very interesting workshop, Nurturing a Successful Academic/Early Professional Publishing Career, will be held at the SAVIR 2015 conference in New Orleans next month. The workshop will be held from 4.45pm to 6.00pm in the Oak Alley room, Sheraton Hotel. Why are we holding this workshop? Because academic environments expect early career professionals to publish […]

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Sharing Data Collection Instruments

In the April 2014 issue, I highlighted a new service from SAVIR and  SafetyLit – a searchable repository of injury-related data collection instruments. In follow-up correspondence, Kavi Bhalla points out that the injuries group in the  global burden of disease study had also compiled a collection of  instruments with questions related to measuring injury incidence. Interested? You […]

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Public and political perception of risk: Injury prevention implications

Unfortunately in Australia in the last week, two men have died as a result of shark bites. The media response, which by no means is unique in these cases, has been overwhelming, with responses ranging from the call to kill the offending sharks (despite protestations of the family, for example see http://www.abc.net.au/news/2013-12-01/search-for-shark-that-killed-bodyboarder-zac-young/5127228), and increasing the range of shark netting […]

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Anti helmet legislation revisited… and why replication is important

Another anti helmet legislation argument bites the dust When Ian Walker’s paper appeared in Accid Anal Prev in 2007 purporting to show that cars drove closer to helmeted than unhelmeted cyclists, it was quickly used as another argument against helmet legislation. But for me as a long time cyclist, something did not ring true. Jake […]

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Distractions – a growing injury issue moving beyond the car?

Distracted driving has justifiably received a tremendous amount of attention in the injury prevention field. But the issue of distractions and the associated injury risk might be getting even bigger and becoming more relevant outside of the motor vehicle realm. There is lots of interesting speculation about an impending boom in wearable computing. Several major […]

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