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Frontline Gastroenterology Twitter Debates #FGDebate

‘Frontline IBD: Nutrition in IBD – what to do in theory and practice’

22 Mar, 16 | by Dr Philip J Smith, Frontline Gastroenterology Trainee Editor

After the great #FGDebate with the Dr Johnson, we are delighted to announce our next #FGDebate will be on Tuesday 22nd March 2016 with Dr Richard Hansen, Consultant Paediatric Gastroenterologist and Ms Joan Gavin, Paediatric Gastroenterology Dietician, at 8-9pm GMT and will discuss, ‘Frontline IBD: Nutrition in IBD – what to do in theory and practice’.

Dr Richard Hansen is a Consultant Paediatric Gastroenterologist at the new Glasgow Children’s Hospital. His main clinical interests are in inflammatory bowel disease, Helicobacter pylori and paediatric liver disease. He completed a PhD in gastrointestinal microbiology in 2012 and has published widely in this field. His ongoing research focuses on microbial therapeutic approaches to managing inflammatory bowel disease, including projects looking at nutrition, probiotics and faecal transplantation. Dr Hansen has been an early advocate of Twitter for free open access medical education (#FOAMED) and currently runs the twitter feed for British Society of Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition (@BSPGHAN), including the live tweeting of key conferences

Dr Richard Hansen

Dr Richard Hansen

 

Ms Joan Gavin is a Paediatric Gastroenterology Dietitian at Southampton Children’s Hospital. Her main interests are inflammatory bowel disease and gut allergy/intolerance. She has completed a masters degree on gastrointestinal malabsorption and has published work on nutritional intakes in inflammatory bowel disease. Joan recently presented data on maintenance nutrition in inflammatory bowel disease highlighting it’s role in prolonging remission at the BSPGHAN conference in January this year.

Ms Joan Gavin

Ms Joan Gavin

 

The #FGDebate will be a practical discussion about how to approach Nutrition in IBD from a theoretical and practical point of view.  We hope you can join us then using #FGDebate

 

‘Frontline Training: The shape of Gastroenterology training in the UK and beyond’

22 Feb, 16 | by Dr Philip J Smith, Frontline Gastroenterology Trainee Editor

After the great #FGDebate with the Ms Kay Greveson, we are delighted to announce our next #FGDebate will be on Tuesday 23rd February 2016 with Dr Gavin Johnson, Consultant Gastroenterologist at UCL Hospitals and The Royal Free Hospital, London, at 8-9pm GMT and will discuss, ‘Frontline Training: The shape of Gastroenterology training in the UK and beyond’.

Dr Gavin Johnson is a Consultant Gastroenterologist at UCL Hospitals and The Royal Free Hospital. His clinical work encompasses pancreaticobiliary medicine with ERCP and EUS, and he has experience of organising numerous postgraduate courses including ERCP hands-on and London Live Endoscopy. He was until 2015 the Chair of the BSG Education Committee, and currently sits on the JAG QA committee with a role in defining the new assessment and JAG accreditation procedures for UK endoscopists in training. Dr Johnson is also a Senior Lecturer in Medical Education at UCL and is the Director of Undergraduate Education at UCL Hospitals and Academic Lead for year 4 of UCL Medical School.

Dr Gavin Johnson

                             Dr Gavin Johnson

During the #FGDebate Dr Gavin Johnson will cover the following objectives:

– To debate the current challenges of UK training in gastroenterology and endoscopy

– To introduce new concepts in the formative and summative assessment and accreditation of UK endoscopists

– To discuss the potential risks and opportunities of the GMC’s Shape of Training

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Missed the #FGDebate with Ms Kay Greveson? Catch up with the Podcast and Storify summary of the debate here – ‘Frontline IBD: Travel and IBD – advice from the IBD Passport’

21 Feb, 16 | by Dr Philip J Smith, Frontline Gastroenterology Trainee Editor

If you missed the #FGDebate with Ms Kay Greveson, ‘Frontline IBD: Travel and IBD – advice from the IBD Passport’ you can catch up with the Storify summary of the #FGDebate at:

https://storify.com/FrontGastro_BMJ/frontline-ibd-travel-and-ibd-advice-from-ibd-passp

The podcast with Ms Kay Greveson can be listened to here:

Don’t forget to join us for the next #FGDebate which is with Dr Gavin Johnson (@drgavinoz) on Tuesday 23rd February 2016, at 8-9pm GMT and will discuss, ‘Frontline Training: The shape of gastroenterology training in the UK and beyond’

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‘Frontline IBD: Travel and IBD – advice from IBD Passport’

19 Jan, 16 | by Dr Philip J Smith, Frontline Gastroenterology Trainee Editor

After the great #FGDebate with the Dr Anton Emmanuel, we are delighted to announce our next #FGDebate will be on Tuesday 19th January 2016 with Ms Kay Greveson, IBD Nurse Specialist at the Royal Free Hospital, London, at 8-9pm GMT and will discuss, ‘Frontline IBD: Travel and IBD – advice from IBD Passport’.

Kay Greveson RGN, MSc, a qualified independent nurse prescriber, now works as lead IBD nurse at the Royal Free Hospital, London. She trained at Sheffield Teaching Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust where she was appointed an IBD specialist nurse. Her research interests include in travel health and IBD, transitional care and screening prior to Anti-TNF therapy. A speaker at national and international events, she has written for numerous journals and co-authored a chapter for ‘IBD Nursing’. She is involved in IBD-related projects for NICE and in Europe, and is a committee or faculty member of organisations including the European Crohn’s and Colitis Organisation.

 

Ms Kay Greveson

Ms Kay Greveson

During the #FGDebate Ms Greveson will cover:

  • Introduction to IBD Passport travel website
  • Pre-travel preparation
  • Vaccinations
  • Managing IBD overseas inc. Diet, medication, post-surgery and flare

Join us on Tuesday 19th January 2016 8-9pm GMT for the #FGDebate

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‘Frontline IBS: An approach to treatment pathways’

7 Dec, 15 | by Dr Philip J Smith, Frontline Gastroenterology Trainee Editor

After the great #FGDebate with the Dr Patch and Dr Tripathi, we are delighted to announce our next #FGDebate will be on Tuesday 29th December 2015, at 8-9pm GMT and will discuss, ‘Frontline IBS: An approach to treatment pathways’.

Dr Anton Emmanuel, Editor in Chief, Frontline Gastroenterology

Anton Emmanuel obtained his medical degree from London University. He is a Senior Lecturer in Neuro-Gastroenterology at University College London and Consultant Gastroenterologist at University College Hospital at the National Hospital for Neurology and Neurosurgery (Queen Square) and the Royal National Orthopaedic Hospital (Stanmore). Prior to this he was Senior Lecturer at Imperial College and St Mark’s Hospital. His current clinical work encompasses being director of the GI Physiology Unit at University College Hospital as well as providing a specialist clinical neuro-gastroenterology service. His research includes basic gut neurophysiology and the study of the aetiology and management of functional gastrointestinal disorders of the upper and lower gut. He currently supervises 5 post-graduate research fellows undertaking higher degrees. He is ex-Chairman of the NeuroGastroenterology (NGM) section of the British Society of Gastroenterology and is the Medical Director of Core, the UK gastrointestinal charity. He is editor in chief of Frontline Gastroenterology, a specialist clinical journal. Best of all he is married with four children and a dog.

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                         Dr Anton Emmanuel

During the #FGDebate Dr Emmanuel will cover the relevant treatment pathways in IBS.

Join us on Tuesday 29th December 2015 8-9pm GMT for the #FGDebate

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‘Frontline Hepatology: Variceal Bleeding Guidelines’

22 Nov, 15 | by Dr Philip J Smith, Frontline Gastroenterology Trainee Editor

After the great #FGDebate with the Professor Rebecca Fitzgerald, we are delighted to announce our next #FGDebate will be on Tuesday 24th November 2015, at 8-9pm GMT and will discuss, ‘Frontline Hepatology: Variceal Bleeding Guidelines’.

Dr Dhiraj Tripathi

Dr Dhiraj Tripathi is a Consultant Hepatologist, with duties covering both general and transplant hepatology. He trained in Edinburgh, and took up his current post in the Queen Elizabeth Hospital, Birmingham in 2008. He has particular interest in clinical aspects of portal hypertension, and was awarded a doctorate based on his clinical research in Edinburgh.

DT_Biography

               Dr Dhiraj Tripathi

He runs a specialist clinic for patients with complications of portal hypertension and vascular disorders such as Budd Chiari Syndrome. He has extensive experience in the management of patients with varices. He is involved in clinical trials of portal hypertension at principal investigator level, and has published widely on the topic with over 40 publications in peer review journals. He is the lead author of the British Society of Gastroenterology’s UK Guidelines on the management of variceal haemorrhage in cirrhotic patients just published in Gut.

Dr David Patch

Dr David Patch was appointed at the Royal Free Hospital as a Registrar in 1993 and completed his gastroenterology/general hepatology specialist training in 1998, accredited in General Internal Medicine and Gastroenterology. He was appointed to a substantive consultant post at the Royal Free Hospital in 1998 in the Department of Hepatology and Liver Transplantation.

Dr David Patch (front)

                         Dr David Patch (front)

Dr Patch’s clinical role is as a Hepatologist and Liver Transplant Physician and his specialist interests include management of portal hypertension and complications of chronic liver disease. He performs upper and lower endoscopies including variceal banding/gastric variceal gluing. He also performs a number of radiological procedures including trans-jugular liver biopsies, hepatic wedge pressure measurements and TIPS procedures. These have comprised his principal areas of research and he has lectured widely on variceal bleeding and complications of portal hypertension.

During the #FGDebate Dr Tripathi and Dr Patch will cover:

  • Primary prevention of variceal bleeding
  • Acute bleeding management and secondary prevention with reference to BSG guidelines and Baveno 6 consensus
  • TIPS in secondary prevention
  • ‘What’s Hot from AASLD’

Join us on Tuesday 24th November 2015 8-9pm GMT for the #FGDebate

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‘Frontline Barrett’s: Screening, surveillance and therapy’

5 Oct, 15 | by Dr Philip J Smith, Frontline Gastroenterology Trainee Editor

After the great #FGDebate with the SWiG-BSG Network Mentoring Team, we are delighted to announce our next #FGDebate with be a UEG Week on Tuesday 22nd September 2015, at 8-9pm GMT and will discuss, ‘Frontline Barrett’s: Screening, surveillance and therapy’.

Professor Rebecca Fitzgerald holds a personal chair in Cancer Prevention at the University of Cambridge. She is a tenured Programme Leader at the MRC Cancer Unit at the Hutchison-MRC Research Centre in Cambridge and she is a Honorary Consultant in Gastroenterology at Addenbrooke’s Hospital Cambridge.  She graduated from Cambridge University in 1992, performed a research degree at Stanford University, California (1995-1997) and then undertook specialist clinical training and postdoctoral research at Barts and The London Hospitals (1997-2001). Whilst at Barts funding from an MRC Clinician Scientist award was instrumental for Rebecca to continue her clinical training and also make progress with her laboratory research. She moved back to Cambridge in 2001 to the newly established MRC Cancer Unit (formerly the MRC Cancer Cell Unit) which had translational cancer research at the heart of it’s mission. A position within this unit was ideal for Rebecca since the focus of her research is to improve methods for early detection of oesophageal cancer through better understanding of the molecular pathogenesis.  Furthermore, being located in an MRC unit with core funding, embedded within a Cancer Centre, has been enabled Rebecca to conduct patient orientated research which requires time to build up the infrastructure and sample resource.

Professor Rebecca Fitzgerald

                   Professor Rebecca Fitzgerald

Rebecca was awarded the prestigious Westminster medal and prize for her first proof of concept work on the Cytosponge and associated assays for diagnosing Barrett’s oesophagus in 2004 and this received an NHS Innovation prize in 2011.  She received a Lister Prize Fellowship in 2008 and in 2013 Rebecca was awarded an NIHR Research Professorship to facilitate translational research for patient benefit.  In recognition of her work she has given the Goulstonian Lecturer at the Royal College of Physicians and was awarded the Sir Francis Avery Jones Medal from the British Society of Gastroenterology.  Rebecca enjoys teaching and communicating science to the public.  She directs studies for medical students at Trinity College Cambridge and is a Fellow of the Institute for Learning and Teaching.  She has a wealth of lecturing experience including radio broadcasts for BBC Radio 4 and ABC Radio Australia, Health of the Nation.  Rebecca is committed to bringing research advances into clinical practice and inspiring other researchers to do likewise.

In advance of the #FGDebate, the questions Professor Fitzgerald will try and answer include:

  • Given the low conversion rate from Barrett’s to adenocarcinoma should we do surveillance?
  • Is there an alternative to endoscopy for diagnosis and surveillance of Barrett’s?
  • Who should have ablation therapy?
  • The Dutch have advocated centralisation of surveillance – is this a good idea?
  • Do biomarkers play a role in Barrett’s?
  • How can we tell which patients will progress?

Join us on Tuesday 6th October 2015 7-8pm GMT for the #FGDebate!

Oct_ecard

‘Frontline Gastroenterology: Supporting Women in Gastroenterology’

18 Sep, 15 | by Dr Philip J Smith, Frontline Gastroenterology Trainee Editor

After the great #FGDebate with Dr Mark McAlindon, we are delighted to announce our next #FGDebate will be with the SWiG-BSG Network Mentoring Team, Dr Cathryn Edwards (@CathrynmEdwards), Dr Jayne Eaden (@JayneEaden), Dr Penny Neild (@pneild), Dr Siwan Thomas Gibson (@SiwanTG), Dr Melanie Lockett (@lockett_dr) and Dr Alenka Brooks (@AlenkaBrooks) on Tuesday 22nd September 2015, at 8-9pm GMT and will discuss, ‘Frontline Gastroenterology: Supporting Women in Gastroenterology’.

Dr Cathryn Edwards

Dr Cathryn Edwards was appointed Consultant at Torbay Hospital, South Devon in 2002 having trained in Gastroenterology at Oxford. Prior to a career in Medicine she read Modern History (The Queen’s College, Oxford 1980-83). Her postgraduate training in medicine culminated in an MRC Fellowship supporting her D.Phil studies into mucins in the defunctioned colorectum.

Her clinical interests are IBD, the microscopic colitidies, anorexia nervosa and upper GI cancer. She became the first woman Secretary of the BSG in 2011: as BSG Senior Secretary she was responsible for running the 2014 and 2015 Annual Meetings, setting up a ‘Taster Membership’ scheme for the Society and more latterly has launched with colleagues a BSG network to support women in their Gastroenterology careers.

Dr Cathryn Edwards

         Dr Cathryn Edwards

She has several national roles in IBD (National IBD Audit Steering committee; National IBD Registry Board). She was the IBD Associate Editor of Frontline Gastroenterology until 2012 and a previous Editor of the CCUK news. She is clinical lead for IBD in her own hospital, South Devon Health Care Foundation Trust.

Dr Jayne Eaden

Dr Jayne Eaden graduated in Medicine in 1992 from the University of Leicester. She undertook her Gastroenterology training in the Trent Region, receiving her CCT in 2002. During her training she spent two years out of programme, undertaking research in colorectal cancer in patients with ulcerative colitis and was awarded an MD with distinction in 2000.

Dr Jayne Eaden

                   Dr Jayne Eaden

She is a co-author of the BSG & American Gastroenterology Association guidelines for cancer surveillance in IBD patients. She spent a sabbatical year in Adelaide, Australia (2000-1). She was appointed as Consultant Gastroenterologist at University Hospital Coventry & Warwickshire in 2002. Her main clinical interests are in inflammatory bowel disease, endoscopy and training. Her key roles include Trust endoscopy lead (2005-12), Trust lead for IBD (2004-), Departmental Education Lead (2006-11), Local Bowel Cancer Screening Programme Director (2006-13), Clinical Lead for gastroenterology (2009-), member and secretary of the BSG IBD Committee (2012-15) and she is now Senior Secretary of the BSG. She is an examiner and co-host for the Royal College of Physicians PACES exam. She has 40 peer-reviewed publications and is also a reviewer for Gut, Gastroenterology, Am J Gastroenterology and A, P & T.

Dr Melanie Lockett

Dr Melanie Lockett did her Gastroenterology training on the North West Thames Specialist Registrar rotation in London. She did her MD research ‘Hyperplastic polyposis, serrated polyps and the serrated colorectal cancer pathway’ with Prof Wendy Atkin at the Cancer Research UK laboratory at St Mark’s Hospital, Middlesex.

Dr Melanie Lockett

             Dr Melanie Lockett

Since her appointment as a Consultant in 2005, Dr Lockett has developed her interests in luminal gastroenterology, colonoscopy, nutrition and training and is the Trust’s lead clinician for inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and nutrition (2005 – ) as well as the Gastroenterology Specialty Tutor at Southmead Hospital (2008 – ), North Bristol NHS Trust. She is a bowel cancer screening colonoscopist for the Bristol & Weston Bowel Cancer Screening Centre (2008 – ) and is an Honorary Consultant at Cardiff & Vale University Health Board, Wales where she undertakes colonic EMR lists (2015- ). Dr Lockett was the Gastroenterology Training Programme Director to the Severn Deanery 2008 – 2013, was the deputy chair of the British Society of Gastroenterology (BSG) training committee (2011-2015), has just become the chair of this committee and is also the BSG workforce lead (2013- ).

Dr Penny Neild

Dr Penny Neild qualified in Medicine from the University of Birmingham in 1987 and moved to London after doing house jobs. She initially worked as a lecturer in Physiology at the London Hospital Medical College before undertaking a general medical training rotation in East London. She moved to Northwest Thames in 1993 to take up a training rotation in Gastroenterology. During this time Penny undertook a period of research in HIV, culminating in the award of an MD. She was appointed as a Consultant Gastroenterologist and Honorary Senior Lecturer at St. George’s Hospital in 2001.

Dr Penny Neild

                      Dr Penny Neild

She is passionately interested in medical education, both at undergraduate and postgraduate levels. She is heavily involved in organisation and delivery of undergraduate medical teaching within St. George’s University of London, being academic lead and Chief examiner for the penultimate year of the MBBS programme. Postgraduate activities include being Associate Director for Medical Education for the Trust, as well as former Training Programme Director for Gastroenterology for South Thames and Chair of the BSG Training Committee.

She has a particular interest in nutrition and has been active in a number of national organisations to promote better education in nutrition, both at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Penny developed an interest in mentoring as a result of her interactions with undergraduate students and trainees and the recognition of the need and potential worth of such a process. She has been involved with the London Deanery Coaching and Mentoring service since its inception in 2008 and enjoyed coaching doctors at all stages of their career, from junior trainee to senior consultant.

Dr Siwan Thomas-Gibson

Dr Siwan Thomas-Gibson graduated in Medicine in 1992 from St Mary’s Hospital, Imperial College London. She undertook her Gastroenterology training in North West London and Oxford regions, receiving my CCT in 2006. She completed her training initially full time and subsequently part-time, throughout my research and in completing my clinical training. She was a supernumerary trainee and switched regions post research to complete her training in the Oxford region.

During her training she spent three years out of programme, undertaking research in the Colonoscopy training and Assessment under the supervision of Brian Saunders and Wendy Atkin. She gained her MD in 2006. She was appointed as Consultant Gastroenterologist at St. Mark’s Hospital, Harrow, London in 2006. Her main clinical interests are in endoscopy, specifically colonoscopy, the early diagnosis of cancer, screening and therapeutic colonoscopy as well as training, safety and quality.

Dr Siwan Thomas Gibson

             Dr Siwan Thomas-Gibson

Her key roles include Trust endoscopy lead, Deputy Director Bowel Cancer Screening, previously Endoscopy Training lead and current sub-dean (Education) of St Mark’s Academic Institute. She has recently been appointed as Secretary to the BSG Endoscopy Committee. She also sits on the National Bowel Cancer Screening Accreditation panel.

Dr Alenka Brooks

Dr Alenka Brooks graduated from Sheffield University in 2001 and is currently a Clinical Research Fellow in Gastroenterology based at Sheffield Teaching Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust (STHFT).  Alenka has a specialist interest in luminal gastroenterology, in particular therapeutics in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD).  Her interest in clinical pharmacology developed during her time working as Associate Clinical Lecturer in Clinical Pharmacology & Therapeutics, Christchurch Public Hospital, New Zealand.  The focus of Alenka’s current research funded by Crohn’s and Colitis UK is illness perceptions of young people living with IBD whist transitioning from child to adult services.

Dr Alenka Brooks

                                Dr Alenka Brooks

Alenka has undertaken a Leadership & Quality Improvement Fellowship where she trained as a Microsystem Coach, an executive coach and conceived a regional network; Sheffield Women in Medicine (SWiM). SWiM has over 450 members and employs 2 leadership fellows bringing together a unique collaboration of the Faculty of Medicine at The University of Sheffield, Yorkshire & Humber Health Education and STHFT to promote the careers to women in medicine regionally. In recognition of this transformational work, Alenka was awarded the Personal, Fair & Diverse Champion Individual Award by NHS Employers.

Alenka is a former chair of the Trainees Section of the British Society of Gastroenterology and in recognition of contributions to the Society she was awarded the BSG President’s Medal in 2014 and in 2015 was named BSG Young Gastroenterologist of the Year; Emerging Leader.

In advance of the #FGDebate, Dr Jayne Eaden, on behalf of the SWiG-BSG Network Mentoring Team says:

“50% of medical students are female and by 2017, women will be in the majority. Women already make up 40% of all doctors with majority working as GPs. Women are not moving into the whole range of medical specialties in proportion to their numbers. Thirty four percent of gastroenterology trainees are female. Seventeen percent of consultants are female (compared with 32% of all medical specialties). Women are under-represented as clinical researchers, full-time academics, heads of department and in all levels of NHS & university management/leadership.

In founding a professional network within the wider BSG, the primary purpose of Supporting Women in Gastroenterology (SWiG) is to define the key problems of recruitment of women to Gastroenterology and to promote the need to encourage women to step forward to senior leadership roles in their careers and in the Society itself. It is not a call for positive discrimination on behalf of the BSG, but rather a recognition that Gastroenterology as a specialty is significantly ‘behind the curve’ in terms of absolute numbers of women and their representation within the Society.

Mentoring is already widely used in both academic and clinical medicine and science to develop the careers of junior and mid career academics and doctors, especially in the United States. It’s been shown to be an especially helpful intervention to nurture, retain and develop under-represented groups. We have decided to pilot a mentoring scheme for female members of the SWIG network, in order to address the gender gap in senior roles in gastroenterology in the UK. Whilst the mentorship pilot scheme includes female mentees only as its trial group, the mentors (men and women) are being trained in this role with the longer term view, that if successful this scheme will be developed as a membership benefit for the wider society, men and women alike.”

Join us on Tuesday 22nd September 2015 8-9pm GMT for the #FGDebate!

 

Missed the #FGDebate with Dr Mark McAlindon? Catch up with the Podcast and Storify summary of the debate here – ‘Frontline Capsule Endoscopy: The end of the endoscope is nigh’

16 Sep, 15 | by Dr Philip J Smith, Frontline Gastroenterology Trainee Editor

If you missed the #FGDebate with Dr Mark McAlindon on ‘Frontline Capsule Endoscopy: The end of the endoscope is nigh,’ you can catch up with the:

 

Podcast after the #FGDebate at

 

https://soundcloud.com/bmjpodcasts/frontline-capsule-endoscopy-the-end-of-the-endoscope-is-nigh

 

Or the Storify summary of the #FGDebate at

 

https://storify.com/FrontGastro_BMJ/frontline-capsule-endoscopy-the-end-of-the-endosco

 

Don’t forget to join us for the next #FGDebate is with the SWiG-BSG Network Mentoring Team, Dr Cathryn Edwards (@CathrynmEdwards), Dr Jayne Eaden (@JayneEaden), Dr Penny Neild (@pneild), Dr Siwan Thomas Gibson (@SiwanTG), Dr Melanie Lockett (@lockett_dr) and Dr Alenka Brooks (@AlenkaBrooks) on Tuesday 22nd September 2015, at 8-9pm GMT and will discuss, ‘Frontline Gastroenterology: Supporting Women in Gastroenterology’.

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‘Frontline Capsule Endoscopy: The end of the endoscope is nigh’

6 Jul, 15 | by Dr Philip J Smith, Frontline Gastroenterology Trainee Editor

After the great #FGDebate with Professor Andres Cardenas, we are delighted to announce our next #FGDebate will be with Dr Mark McAlindon (@rockinbanjo), Consultant Gastroenterologist and Capsule Endoscopy expert, Sheffield NHS Teaching Hospitals, on Tuesday 7th July 2015, at 8-9pm GMT and will discuss, ‘Frontline Capsule Endoscopy: The end of the endoscope is nigh’.

FGDebate_July_2015_ecard

 

Dr Mark McAlindon BM BS, MRCP(UK), DM is a Consultant Gastroenterologist in Sheffield Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust and Honorary Reader at the University of Sheffield. He trained in Nottingham, Stoke-on-Trent and Melbourne, Australia. He received the British Digestive Foundation Research Training Fellowship between 1994-1996. He is currently the South Yorkshire Health Authority Clinical Lead for the National Endoscopy Programme and Co-director of the European Capsule Endoscopy Castle Course. He is a past member of the BSG Small bowel and Nutrition Committee and current member of the BSG Endoscopy Committee. He was the Previous chair of the UK Capsule Endoscopy Users Group.

Amongst his awards he was winner of the Medipex Innovation Award for the Small Bowel Endoscopy service and the Health Service Journal Patient Safety Award for the Percutaneous Endoscopic Gastrostomy service; runner up with the Croatian Institute of Telemedicine for the Medipex Telehealth award for live web-based training in capsule endoscopy and shortlisted for the Health Services Journal Hall of Fame (for the small bowel service) award 2015. His research interests include clinical aspects of capsule endoscopy, currently magnetically assisted gastric capsule endoscopy. His publications predominantly related to endoscopy, particularly capsule endoscopy. He is senior author of the BSG capsule endoscopy and small bowel endoscopy guidelines, contributor to the European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy guidelines on the same topic, contributor to the ‘Atlas of Capsule Endoscopy’ (Springer) and co-editor of the ‘Handbook of Capsule Endoscopy’ (Springer).

Dr Mark McAlindon

Dr Mark McAlindon

 

In advance of the #FGDebate, Dr Mark McAlindon says:

 

“We perform gastroscopy on 1% of the population per year, mainly for reassurance: most symptoms are functional, reflux- or H pylori-related and less than 1% of patients have malignancies. Similarly, colorectal cancer is an uncommon cause of symptoms in patients undergoing colonoscopy, and polyps, a common finding in older patients, are incidental findings in the symptomatic population. Yet endoscopy is uncomfortable, unpopular with patients and carries the risks of intubation and sedation. Colonoscopists need to remember that their practice is regarded as unusual by the lay public: common factors in non-compliance with colorectal cancer screening programmes is the embarrassment of exposing the buttocks and fear of ‘accidents’ during the procedure.

 

Capsule endoscopy involves swallowing a pill camera which passes through the gastrointestinal tract under the action of peristalsis. It is a first line investigative modality of the small bowel, more sensitive than push enteroscopy, barium radiology, CT and, at least for mucosal (as opposed to transmural) disease, MR radiology. Three large multi centre studies suggest a sensitivity of colon capsule endoscopy approaching 90% in the detection of adenomas of at least 10mm when compared to conventional colonoscopy. This is arguably as good as conventional colonoscopy when compared to itself in back to back or tandem colonoscopy studies. The data from the single multi centre study comparing colon capsule to CT colonography suggests that it is at least as good in polyp detection. The data from four studies comparing magnetically assisted capsule endoscopy to conventional gastroscopy in the upper gastrointestinal tract is promising.

 

Currently, there are a number of different capsule endoscopes aimed to image different parts of the gut, but the divisions are arbitrary. Small bowel capsule endoscopy identifies up to 10% of pathology causing anaemia in the upper gastrointestinal tract or caecum. The colon capsule provides excellent visualisation of the small bowel. The oesophageal capsule provides clear gastric images if the stomach is distended with water. All that is needed is improvement in technology to allow imaging devices perhaps at both ends of the capsule, maybe containing magnetic material to allow a degree of control, a transmitter and sufficient battery power in a small enough device to swallow to allow imaging of any part of the gut remotely, without intubation, without sedation and without irradiation.

 

In the debate, I hope to discuss the present and future role of capsule endoscopy alongside conventional endoscopy: diagnostic versus therapeutic tools.”

 

Join us on Tuesday 7th July 2015 8-9pm GMT for the #FGDebate!

 

 

 

 

 

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