Highlights from the October issue of EMJ

Emerg Med J 2014;31:793 doi:10.1136/emermed-2014-204282 Highlights from this issue Ian K Maconochie, Deputy editor Conducting emergency research when consent and consultation are a challenge (editor’s choice) Studies in patients with emergency conditions that render them unable to give consent have been very difficult to conduct owing to ethical considerations. The guidance offered in the commentary […]

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Gallows humour at the hanging committee

Have you ever submitted to the EMJ or to any other journal for that matter? If so then you will know the fear and trepidation that results as you wait for the answer from the editor. Will your paper be accepted (hurrah) or rejected (boo). I’ve experienced much pain at the hands of editors and […]

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How Are We Accelerating Knowledge Translation?

In contemporary medicine, the first exposure to new evidence comes first in abstracts and conference presentations, filters through peer-review into journal publication, and, finally, into textbooks. Then, the process of translating knowledge into practice change takes place, slowly percolating into the current physician base through guidelines and expert recommendation, followed by trainees indoctrinated into the […]

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Life Behind the Scenes. Life as a TV medical advisor with Iain Beardsell.

Like many of life’s opportunities it all started by accident.  I was having a corridor conversation with a past CEM President, John Heyworth, who was relating his previous day’s activities – “I had a meeting with the Academy of Royal Colleges, caught a bit of the Lords’ Test and then met a researcher from Casualty”. […]

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Choosing Well vs. Choosing Wisely

In the United Kingdom, the NHS and Manchester publish “Choose Well” – a guide for patients in need, to help them find the healthcare resources correct for them.  The resources described include self-care, local general practitioner services, and advice regarding when to choose Urgent Care or Accident & Emergency services.  In a system where resources […]

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Spotlight Interview: DevelopingEM

Today, we virtually interview Lee Fineberg and Mark Newcombe, the hearts and brains behind DevelopingEM.  They are emergency physicians who have returned from Havana, Cuba, after the second edition of their conference concept providing resources and support to medical education in the developing world. Tell us a little bit about visiting Cuba, a place that’s traditionally […]

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Tweeting Locally, Reaching Globally

The necessity of providing emergency care is not restricted to the world’s wealthiest countries. The lucky few living in settings with access to 24/7 emergency care, staffed by physicians educated in rigorous, structured settings, benefit from the resources disproportionately available. These clinicians have the support of their hospital physician education programs, may be funded for […]

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#severn2014 – is #FOAMed entering the mainstream?

In February 2013 the EMJ published an analysis of the effect of social media at the ICEM conference in Dublin. For many this represented a tipping point in the use of social media for EM education. Prior to ICEM 2012 many perceived online learning to be a hobby, a little risque and certainly something quite […]

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Reasons to be cheerful 1.2.3 with Iain Beardsell

There are many reasons to be cheerful in emergency medicine…. The almost constant talk in the media of a “Crisis in A&E” (sic) has made me contemplate why I’m not always dreading work or considering other employment options.  Daily news headlines are a constant reminder of the difficulties we face on a day to day […]

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