Primary survey Highlights from the January 2015 issue. Mary Dawood, Editor

A mask tells us more than a face (Editor’s choice) As ED clinicians we often pride ourselves on recognising the sickest patients by how they look, this skill is tacit and one that is the result of experience and longevity in emergency care. Our psychiatric colleagues have long accumulated significant research into disturbances in affect […]

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The view from the F2…..

As an aspiring emergency physician I have been keeping a close eye on the latest media frenzy regarding the NHS crisis. My own feeling is that from working in the NHS over the Christmas and New Year period is that the hospitals are considerably busier than this time last year. Headlines such as ”hospital declares […]

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The Role of IO in Trauma: A #FOAMed Debate

The Emergency Medicine Journal recently published a review of intraosseous access experience from the Royal Army Medical Corps. This review documents 1,014 IO devices and 5,124 infusions of blood products, medications, and fluids. There were no major complications, and the rate of minor complications was extraordinarily low – the most frequent being device failure, occurring […]

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Highlights from the October issue of EMJ

Emerg Med J 2014;31:793 doi:10.1136/emermed-2014-204282 Highlights from this issue Ian K Maconochie, Deputy editor Conducting emergency research when consent and consultation are a challenge (editor’s choice) Studies in patients with emergency conditions that render them unable to give consent have been very difficult to conduct owing to ethical considerations. The guidance offered in the commentary […]

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Why do we call it ‘Teaching’?

A Reflection on Teaching and Learning Culture in UK Emergency Medicine   One of the things that most amuses my school teacher friends is my insistence on referring to postgraduate educational opportunities as ‘teaching sessions’, e.g. ’I’ve got regional teaching this afternoon’. I’m not alone here in referring to ‘teaching’ – it’s common amongst doctors […]

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What’s your target BP for ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm?

  A couple of years ago I was very (very, very) peripherally involved in an RCT investigating the management of ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm. The IMPROVE trial was well designed and reported it’s results in 2014. The abstract is shown below, and I must admit that to my surprise there did not appear to be […]

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How Are We Accelerating Knowledge Translation?

In contemporary medicine, the first exposure to new evidence comes first in abstracts and conference presentations, filters through peer-review into journal publication, and, finally, into textbooks. Then, the process of translating knowledge into practice change takes place, slowly percolating into the current physician base through guidelines and expert recommendation, followed by trainees indoctrinated into the […]

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Spotlight Interview: DevelopingEM

Today, we virtually interview Lee Fineberg and Mark Newcombe, the hearts and brains behind DevelopingEM.  They are emergency physicians who have returned from Havana, Cuba, after the second edition of their conference concept providing resources and support to medical education in the developing world. Tell us a little bit about visiting Cuba, a place that’s traditionally […]

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#severn2014 – is #FOAMed entering the mainstream?

In February 2013 the EMJ published an analysis of the effect of social media at the ICEM conference in Dublin. For many this represented a tipping point in the use of social media for EM education. Prior to ICEM 2012 many perceived online learning to be a hobby, a little risque and certainly something quite […]

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