How Junior Doctors Think: A Guide for Reflective Practice

In the UK, junior doctors will rotate through emergency medicine in their second year post-graduation (Foundation Year 2). They’re granted autonomy to make independent decisions and ‘own’ patients for the first time. Elsewhere in the hospital, a junior’s role is largely secretarial, and generally within the confines of ‘normal working hours’. In the ED, the hours are brutal, the […]

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ECG Marksmanship: Posterior Wellen’s Syndrome

One of the most rewarding elements of emergency medicine is spotting a potentially catastrophic situation at an early stage, and proceeding to ‘nip it in the bud’ before things start getting hairy. To coin a military analogy: a battalion might be perfectly capable of neutralising the enemy in close-quarters combat, but in an ideal world, […]

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Primary Survey September 2016: EMJ

This month’s primary survey from the EMJ. Emergency Triage and Treatment Course in primary care health centres in Guatamala Emergency triage Assessment and treatment (ETAT) course was developed by WHO in 1999 as part of its Integrated Management of Childhood Illnesses program for improving outcomes for children. It has been devised as a hospital based […]

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Should More Emergency Physicians be ‘Piloting British Airways’? The Musings of a Trainee: EMJ

Emergency physicians (EPs) routinely manage the sick, undifferentiated patients in whom life-saving interventions need to be executed rapidly. Our Royal College defines emergency medicine as ‘the specialty in which time is critical.’ In severe illness or injury, ‘A’ comes first. Securing a definitive airway is the gateway to the rest of critical care; without one, our […]

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OT in the ED

“Occupational therapists help people to do the things they want to do” In this month’s EMJ, Kirstin James details the work that occupational therapists (OTs) have been carrying out up and down the country’s emergency departments to facilitate a return to normality after an illness or injury. She tells the story of an 87 year […]

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Primary survey Highlights from the January 2015 issue. Mary Dawood, Editor

A mask tells us more than a face (Editor’s choice) As ED clinicians we often pride ourselves on recognising the sickest patients by how they look, this skill is tacit and one that is the result of experience and longevity in emergency care. Our psychiatric colleagues have long accumulated significant research into disturbances in affect […]

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