Live and let die

Everyone dies. It’s a sad fact of life and a tough part of any healthcare professional’s day. Some deaths are unexpected, and hit us hard. Thankfully, there are those that we know are coming, and this gives us the opportunity to try to give that person a peaceful and comfortable end of their life, and for […]

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The weekend effect: Part 2 – a traumatic time!

If you haven’t already, listen to Ellen Weber and Chris Moulton talk about the background to the weekend effect. Click HERE. The UK Junior Doctors’ contract changes imposed by the government in order to shape their poorly defined ‘Seven Day NHS’ caused much debate and consternation surrounding the ‘weekend effect’, which seemed to be the […]

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The weekend effect. Part 1.

Chris Moulton VP of the Royal College of Emergency Medicine and Ellen Weber discuss the weekend effect. This is well worth a listen to get behind the headlines and politics of a controversial meme in healthcare. What is it? Is there an effect and what can we do about it? Click on this link to […]

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Primary Survey: November 2016.

Richard Body, Associate Editor The Manchester derby for paediatric early warning scores There is clearly a need for a validated physiological early warning score for specific use in the paediatric emergency department (PED). In this issue, Cotterill et al compare two paediatric early warning scores developed in Manchester: the Royal Manchester Children’s Hospital Early Warning […]

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How Junior Doctors Think: A Guide for Reflective Practice

In the UK, junior doctors will rotate through emergency medicine in their second year post-graduation (Foundation Year 2). They’re granted autonomy to make independent decisions and ‘own’ patients for the first time. Elsewhere in the hospital, a junior’s role is largely secretarial, and generally within the confines of ‘normal working hours’. In the ED, the hours are brutal, the […]

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ECG Marksmanship: Posterior Wellen’s Syndrome

One of the most rewarding elements of emergency medicine is spotting a potentially catastrophic situation at an early stage, and proceeding to ‘nip it in the bud’ before things start getting hairy. To coin a military analogy: a battalion might be perfectly capable of neutralising the enemy in close-quarters combat, but in an ideal world, […]

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Primary Survey September 2016: EMJ

This month’s primary survey from the EMJ. Emergency Triage and Treatment Course in primary care health centres in Guatamala Emergency triage Assessment and treatment (ETAT) course was developed by WHO in 1999 as part of its Integrated Management of Childhood Illnesses program for improving outcomes for children. It has been devised as a hospital based […]

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