Primary Survey June 2018. Emergency Medicine Journal

This month the primary survey is collated and written by Edward Carlton, Associate Editor, EMJ. Editor’s Choice: Controversies in Sepsis In this issue of the Emergency Medicine Journal (EMJ) we have two papers exploring tools to predict critical illness in sepsis. Two retrospective cohort studies, in ED patients with suspected sepsis/infection, evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of […]

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Primary Survey May 2018. Emergency Medicine Journal.

This month’s primary survey is brought to you by Caroline Leech, Associate Editor, EMJ. Does a brief intervention in the ED reduce illicit drug use? Health promotion is critical in Emergency Medicine (EM), and Brief interventions (BI) for alcohol use are well established. This prospective cohort study assessed the efficacy of a BI for drug […]

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The ‘Deliberate Practice Mindset’

Performance improvement is an interest of mine. I have previously blogged and podcasted about the strategies I employed to lift my game (from rock-bottom) when working in an extreme environment – a South African township ED. I first became aware of ‘deliberate practice’ after reading an excellent St. Emlyn’s post last year. I had never encountered the concept before, but […]

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What do Emergency Medicine and Donald J. Trump have in common?

*Caution: Emotionally-charged post, pinch of salt required… personal feelings only and not the editorial view of the EMJ/BMJ. On the morning of the 9th November 2016, I woke up to the earth-shattering news that Donald Trump had been elected President Elect of the United States. It’s a moment I’ll never forget. Rain pounded menacingly against […]

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The weekend effect. Part 1.

Chris Moulton VP of the Royal College of Emergency Medicine and Ellen Weber discuss the weekend effect. This is well worth a listen to get behind the headlines and politics of a controversial meme in healthcare. What is it? Is there an effect and what can we do about it? Click on this link to […]

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How Junior Doctors Think: A Guide for Reflective Practice

In the UK, junior doctors will rotate through emergency medicine in their second year post-graduation (Foundation Year 2). They’re granted autonomy to make independent decisions and ‘own’ patients for the first time. Elsewhere in the hospital, a junior’s role is largely secretarial, and generally within the confines of ‘normal working hours’. In the ED, the hours are brutal, the […]

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ECG Marksmanship: Posterior Wellen’s Syndrome

One of the most rewarding elements of emergency medicine is spotting a potentially catastrophic situation at an early stage, and proceeding to ‘nip it in the bud’ before things start getting hairy. To coin a military analogy: a battalion might be perfectly capable of neutralising the enemy in close-quarters combat, but in an ideal world, […]

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Should More Emergency Physicians be ‘Piloting British Airways’? The Musings of a Trainee: EMJ

Emergency physicians (EPs) routinely manage the sick, undifferentiated patients in whom life-saving interventions need to be executed rapidly. Our Royal College defines emergency medicine as ‘the specialty in which time is critical.’ In severe illness or injury, ‘A’ comes first. Securing a definitive airway is the gateway to the rest of critical care; without one, our […]

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