Say Never!

  In my last blog I wrote about retained guidewires and why they are important to those of us in the Emergency Department. There were some tips on how to prevent retained guidewires through observership, redundancy, and good clear verbal and written documentation to promote absolute certainty that the guidewire has been removed. I also […]

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The weekend effect: Part 2 – a traumatic time!

If you haven’t already, listen to Ellen Weber and Chris Moulton talk about the background to the weekend effect. Click HERE. The UK Junior Doctors’ contract changes imposed by the government in order to shape their poorly defined ‘Seven Day NHS’ caused much debate and consternation surrounding the ‘weekend effect’, which seemed to be the […]

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Primary survey Highlights from the January 2015 issue. Mary Dawood, Editor

A mask tells us more than a face (Editor’s choice) As ED clinicians we often pride ourselves on recognising the sickest patients by how they look, this skill is tacit and one that is the result of experience and longevity in emergency care. Our psychiatric colleagues have long accumulated significant research into disturbances in affect […]

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The view from the F2…..

As an aspiring emergency physician I have been keeping a close eye on the latest media frenzy regarding the NHS crisis. My own feeling is that from working in the NHS over the Christmas and New Year period is that the hospitals are considerably busier than this time last year. Headlines such as ”hospital declares […]

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The Role of IO in Trauma: A #FOAMed Debate

The Emergency Medicine Journal recently published a review of intraosseous access experience from the Royal Army Medical Corps. This review documents 1,014 IO devices and 5,124 infusions of blood products, medications, and fluids. There were no major complications, and the rate of minor complications was extraordinarily low – the most frequent being device failure, occurring […]

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Why do we call it ‘Teaching’?

A Reflection on Teaching and Learning Culture in UK Emergency Medicine   One of the things that most amuses my school teacher friends is my insistence on referring to postgraduate educational opportunities as ‘teaching sessions’, e.g. ’I’ve got regional teaching this afternoon’. I’m not alone here in referring to ‘teaching’ – it’s common amongst doctors […]

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What are we doing in EM?

It’s been a tough few months in UK Emergency Departments and has caused me recently to do a bit of thinking, as I knew I was losing a bit of my zeal and enthusiasm for our specialty. Yes, there’s the constant unrelenting pressure over targets and working under very trying circumstances with overcrowding and understaffing […]

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