Safety Newsflash! Retained Guidewires.

  If you’re a member of the Royal College of Emergency Medicine in the UK, you may have noticed an email pop up in your inbox recently, a safety newsflash on retained guidewires. RCEM put these out every few months, containing helpful and brief information in the crusade against events that should never happen, as […]

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Should More Emergency Physicians be ‘Piloting British Airways’? The Musings of a Trainee: EMJ

Emergency physicians (EPs) routinely manage the sick, undifferentiated patients in whom life-saving interventions need to be executed rapidly. Our Royal College defines emergency medicine as ‘the specialty in which time is critical.’ In severe illness or injury, ‘A’ comes first. Securing a definitive airway is the gateway to the rest of critical care; without one, our […]

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Learning from Major Incidents

In this month’s EMJ, David Lowe, Jonathan Millar and colleagues from Glasgow Royal Infirmary (GRI) and the University of Glasgow share their experience gained from the tragic events that unfolded in their city in 2013 and 2014. The first –  where a police helicopter crashed into the Clutha Vaults pub due to a fuel management […]

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The Role of IO in Trauma: A #FOAMed Debate

The Emergency Medicine Journal recently published a review of intraosseous access experience from the Royal Army Medical Corps. This review documents 1,014 IO devices and 5,124 infusions of blood products, medications, and fluids. There were no major complications, and the rate of minor complications was extraordinarily low – the most frequent being device failure, occurring […]

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What’s your target BP for ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm?

  A couple of years ago I was very (very, very) peripherally involved in an RCT investigating the management of ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm. The IMPROVE trial was well designed and reported it’s results in 2014. The abstract is shown below, and I must admit that to my surprise there did not appear to be […]

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How Are We Accelerating Knowledge Translation?

In contemporary medicine, the first exposure to new evidence comes first in abstracts and conference presentations, filters through peer-review into journal publication, and, finally, into textbooks. Then, the process of translating knowledge into practice change takes place, slowly percolating into the current physician base through guidelines and expert recommendation, followed by trainees indoctrinated into the […]

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