Live and let die

Everyone dies. It’s a sad fact of life and a tough part of any healthcare professional’s day. Some deaths are unexpected, and hit us hard. Thankfully, there are those that we know are coming, and this gives us the opportunity to try to give that person a peaceful and comfortable end of their life, and for […]

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Dispatching stress in the EOC #IAM999

In this month’s EMJ, Astrid Coxon and team have published a study looking at the experiences of staff working in local Emergency Operations Centres (EOCs). Broadly, staff who work there are in two groups. There are call takers who answer 999 calls from members of the public, process the information they receive, triage it, and […]

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Medical Challenge 2016. EMJ

If you were at SMACC this year, or the last college conference, you’ll be aware of developments in pre-hospital schemes throughout the UK. In particular, Northern Ireland is undergoing a pre-hospital revolution. Plans afoot for a HEMS programme, increasing awareness and involvement from doctors, and university schemes forming to enable students to gain experience and skills […]

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Learning from Major Incidents

In this month’s EMJ, David Lowe, Jonathan Millar and colleagues from Glasgow Royal Infirmary (GRI) and the University of Glasgow share their experience gained from the tragic events that unfolded in their city in 2013 and 2014. The first –  where a police helicopter crashed into the Clutha Vaults pub due to a fuel management […]

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The Balance of Risks and Harms in Trauma Immobilization

In a recent online-first publication in the EMJ, McDonald et al canvas the literature regarding selective immobilization protocols in trauma. Their most significant finding, unfortunately, is the low quality of the evidence and the high degree of bias present across included studies. This limits the authors’ attempted analysis of sensitivity and specificity of selective immobilization […]

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The Role of IO in Trauma: A #FOAMed Debate

The Emergency Medicine Journal recently published a review of intraosseous access experience from the Royal Army Medical Corps. This review documents 1,014 IO devices and 5,124 infusions of blood products, medications, and fluids. There were no major complications, and the rate of minor complications was extraordinarily low – the most frequent being device failure, occurring […]

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Open Access at EMJ: Cognitive appraisals, objectivity and coping in ambulance workers: a pilot study.

The EMJ regularly publishes open access papers so that anyone with an internet connection can get access to the full paper for free. This is a great option for those without limited access to e-libraries or personal subscriptions.  This month the open access paper looks at the psychological morbidity amongst ambulance workers in the UK. […]

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