Why do we call it ‘Teaching’?

A Reflection on Teaching and Learning Culture in UK Emergency Medicine   One of the things that most amuses my school teacher friends is my insistence on referring to postgraduate educational opportunities as ‘teaching sessions’, e.g. ’I’ve got regional teaching this afternoon’. I’m not alone here in referring to ‘teaching’ – it’s common amongst doctors […]

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The Science Behind Telling “Sick” From “Not Sick”

Jeff Kline contributed a very interesting article to the Emergency Medicine Journal last week – offering up a bit of a potential science behind the “gestalt” in medicine. We’ve seen multiple examples where clinician gestalt performance is very similar to carefully-derived, evidence-based, risk-stratification criteria. Specifically, the diagnoses of “acute coronary syndrome” and “pulmonary embolism” have […]

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Gallows humour at the hanging committee

Have you ever submitted to the EMJ or to any other journal for that matter? If so then you will know the fear and trepidation that results as you wait for the answer from the editor. Will your paper be accepted (hurrah) or rejected (boo). I’ve experienced much pain at the hands of editors and […]

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Saying I’m sorry. Iain Beardsell for EMJ

Like many of you, I suspect, many of my most “educational” experiences haven’t come from sitting in lectures, reading textbooks or even listening to podcasts. They have come simply from living life and all of the ups and downs that can be thrown at you. From witnessing the birth of your children, to a close […]

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How Are We Accelerating Knowledge Translation?

In contemporary medicine, the first exposure to new evidence comes first in abstracts and conference presentations, filters through peer-review into journal publication, and, finally, into textbooks. Then, the process of translating knowledge into practice change takes place, slowly percolating into the current physician base through guidelines and expert recommendation, followed by trainees indoctrinated into the […]

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Spotlight Interview: DevelopingEM

Today, we virtually interview Lee Fineberg and Mark Newcombe, the hearts and brains behind DevelopingEM.  They are emergency physicians who have returned from Havana, Cuba, after the second edition of their conference concept providing resources and support to medical education in the developing world. Tell us a little bit about visiting Cuba, a place that’s traditionally […]

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#severn2014 – is #FOAMed entering the mainstream?

In February 2013 the EMJ published an analysis of the effect of social media at the ICEM conference in Dublin. For many this represented a tipping point in the use of social media for EM education. Prior to ICEM 2012 many perceived online learning to be a hobby, a little risque and certainly something quite […]

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