Live and let die

Everyone dies. It’s a sad fact of life and a tough part of any healthcare professional’s day. Some deaths are unexpected, and hit us hard. Thankfully, there are those that we know are coming, and this gives us the opportunity to try to give that person a peaceful and comfortable end of their life, and for […]

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The weekend effect: Part 2 – a traumatic time!

If you haven’t already, listen to Ellen Weber and Chris Moulton talk about the background to the weekend effect. Click HERE. The UK Junior Doctors’ contract changes imposed by the government in order to shape their poorly defined ‘Seven Day NHS’ caused much debate and consternation surrounding the ‘weekend effect’, which seemed to be the […]

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Learning from Major Incidents

In this month’s EMJ, David Lowe, Jonathan Millar and colleagues from Glasgow Royal Infirmary (GRI) and the University of Glasgow share their experience gained from the tragic events that unfolded in their city in 2013 and 2014. The first –  where a police helicopter crashed into the Clutha Vaults pub due to a fuel management […]

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What’s the future of medical journals?

I had the pleasure of joining a panel discussion at the recent SMACC conference on the future of medical journals. I was delighted to share the stage with some real big hitters such as Richard Smith (ex editor of the BMJ) and Jeff Drazen (current editor in chief of the NEJM), together with some amazing […]

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OT in the ED

“Occupational therapists help people to do the things they want to do” In this month’s EMJ, Kirstin James details the work that occupational therapists (OTs) have been carrying out up and down the country’s emergency departments to facilitate a return to normality after an illness or injury. She tells the story of an 87 year […]

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The Balance of Risks and Harms in Trauma Immobilization

In a recent online-first publication in the EMJ, McDonald et al canvas the literature regarding selective immobilization protocols in trauma. Their most significant finding, unfortunately, is the low quality of the evidence and the high degree of bias present across included studies. This limits the authors’ attempted analysis of sensitivity and specificity of selective immobilization […]

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