Global Emergency Care Collaborative: sharing in global health for everyone

Introduction As Emergency Medicine (EM) finds itself in the midst of a pandemic, we are reminded that the practice of medicine is a global endeavour. Alongside the traumatic consequences of COVID-19 will also come opportunities to fundamentally rethink our approach to healthcare, including how to engage with global health. In this article, we report on […]

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Primary Survey December 2019

Do we know what older patients want from emergency care? We are increasingly aware of the preponderance of older patients attending our emergency departments as well as the fact that they are often acutely unwell. It is heartening then to see in this month’s issue some excellent papers pertaining to the care and treatment of […]

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Primary Survey October 2019

Addressing language barriers in the emergency department The ‘Editor’s Choice’ paper covers the critical topic of communication and the concern that patients with a different first language are more likely to experience adverse events and poorer outcomes. How do you communicate with a patient who has a different first language: do you ask a member […]

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Why women’s networks matter: An Australasian experience

In the spring of 2018, an important conversation started in the hallways of the Emergency Department at Campbelltown Hospital – a community hospital on the fringe of Sydney, Australia. Three emergency physicians, the authors, realised we were all following the US-based FemInEM podcast and blog (feminem.org), and each of us was noticing the empowering impact […]

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Primary Survey July 2018

Primary survey  Do EPs change their clinical behaviour in the hallway encounters or when a companion is present? A cross-sectional survey and the commentary by Jacky Hanson and Kirsten Walthall Privacy is a key element in the process of undertaking a consultation with a patient, as it allows due care and attention to paid to the patient’s […]

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Primary Survey June 2018. Emergency Medicine Journal

This month the primary survey is collated and written by Edward Carlton, Associate Editor, EMJ. Editor’s Choice: Controversies in Sepsis In this issue of the Emergency Medicine Journal (EMJ) we have two papers exploring tools to predict critical illness in sepsis. Two retrospective cohort studies, in ED patients with suspected sepsis/infection, evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of […]

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