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Student Nursing

Engaging Students with Twitter

26 Mar, 17 | by josmith

Kirsten Huby, Lecturer Children’s Nursing, University of Leeds (@KirstenHuby)

Emma Wilson, Children’s Nursing Student, University of Leeds (@Emzieness

The latest Horizon report (Adams Becker et al., 2017) recognises collaborative learning as one of the key trends that will be driving Higher Education for the next few years. It suggests that collaborative learning improves engagement, encourages learning that relates to practice and enables communities of practice to be developed. For healthcare students this type of learning can be used to develop the skills to think critically, problem solve and become open to recognising the diverse nature of the health and social care arena. Technology can help to promote collaborative learning but will only be successful if we can engage students and ensure they see the purpose of what is to be achieved.

 

It has been suggested social networking sites (SNS) encourage the type of collaborative learning advocated by (Adams Becker et al., 2017, Prestridge, 2014) ,we cannot assume that a particular type of SNS will necessarily work. In a study on the use of Twitter, students tended to use a tweet to ask a question of a lecturer rather than to collaborate between themselves. The author considers that students may need to be guided and supported to recognise the depth of knowledge and understanding that can be shared in this way (Prestridge, 2014). This implies that in order to be fully engaged students need to understand the purpose of the interaction and the tool that is being used.

To do this, informative learning opportunities and consultation with students needs to occur. The twitter community is diverse; some nurses opt to have separate ‘nursing’ accounts, others opt to combine professional and personal tweets as one online personality. Ultimately this comes down to personal preference. However, it must be considered that social media guidance has been set by the NMC (Nursing and Midwifery Council, 2015) and this and the requirements of the NMC Code must be adhered to at all times; on and offline and regardless of whether an account is identified as personal, professional or both. Student nurses therefore need to have an awareness of their responsibilities and potential accountabilities surrounding any social media use in relation to this.

A significant factor which potentially hinders student participation with SNS in a learning environment is whether they are comfortable with lecturers/mentors potentially having the ability to view personal posts/tweets. One such way around this is to have a specific agreement to not follow students back from University curated accounts. This means that students can view informative tweets / retweets on their timelines, but their own postings aren’t automatically or as easily visible. This leads to an element of ‘privacy’ and choice, allowing students to choose whether to engage with lecturers if they want to, but also benefit from some of the wider aspects of using SNS such as furthering knowledge / sharing views on current research or topical issues and collaborating and engaging with other students and professionals. As we take the next steps with the @UoLchildnursing account we hope to increase our engagement with students and with the help of motivated student twitter champions such as @Emzieness we hope this will be possible.

Adams Becker, S. et al. 2017. NMC Horizon Report: 2017 Higher Education Edition. 2017 ed. Austin, Texas: The New Media Consortium.

Nursing and Midwifery Council. 2015. Guidance on using social media responsibly. London.

Prestridge, S. 2014. A focus on students’ use of Twitter – their interactions with each other, content and interface. Active Learning in Higher Education. 15(2), pp.101-115.

Using Technology to Support Learning – confident, terrified or indifferent?

15 Jan, 17 | by josmith

 

This week’s EBN Twitter Chat on Wednesday 18th January between 8-9 pm (UK time) will be lead by Kirsten Huby, Lecturer in Children’s Nursing, University of Leeds, @KirstenHuby focussing on learning technologies. Participating in the Twitter chat requires a Twitter account; if you do not have one you can create an account at www.twitter.com. Once you have an account, contributing is straightforward. You can follow the discussion by searching links to #ebnjc, or contribute by creating and sending a tweet (tweets are text messages limited to 140 characters) to @EBNursingBMJ adding #ebnjc (the EBN Twitter chat hash tag) to your tweet, this allows everyone taking part to view your tweets.

We are surrounded by technology that assists us in every aspect of our life and education is no exception. It has never been easier to access information and learning resources on an almost infinite number of topics. We can collaborate and attend conferences in virtual spaces and share ideas in real time or whenever we have a minute spare! Our learning can incorporate teacher-led instruction, be led by our own interest and desire to learn or a combination; what is becoming apparent is that social learning in digital forums is enhancing learning by bringing interested parties together (Simon Nelson 2017). As health professionals continually learning and demonstrating how this learning has occurred in the digital world is opening doors and making digital learning easier. Whilst digital learning enables us to be flexible in our learning it also requires a degree of digital literacy. This has been defined by the European commission (2010) as “the confident critical use of ICT for work, leisure, learning and communication”. Digital literacy is a wider concept than just being able to use specific tools it also encompasses the ability to find, manage and evaluate the information that is available and understand how data is stored and shared in order to remain safe in virtual spaces. Ultimately educational technology is there to help improve education and facilitate student learning (Forest, 2015), the educational goals should be identified first but we need to be able to engage with the technology if we are to enhance our learning.

Within the Twitter chat I would like to explore:

  1. What technologies you currently use to support your learning and how effective you think they are?
  2. The reasons why you would choose or not choose to learn using technology?
  3. The facilitators that help you to engage with learning using technology?
  4. The barriers you have encountered to engaging with learning using technology?
  5. And finally the one app, device or program that you wouldn’t want to be without!

For those that feel they would like to learn more about working and learning in digital ways FutureLearn (a digital platform that hosts courses produced by educational institutions, organisations and businesses) offer a number of free online courses to get you started. https://www.futurelearn.com/courses?utf8=%E2%9C%93&filter_category=online-and-digital&filter_availability=new-and-upcoming

European Commission, 2010. Digital Literacy European Commission Working Paper and Recommendations from Digital Literacy High-Level Expert Group. [online]. [Accessed 12 January 2017]. Available from: http://www.ifap.ru/library/book386.pdf

Forest, E., 2015. Educational technology: An Overview. 18 November. Educational technology [online]. [Accessed 12 January 2017]. Available from: http://educationaltechnology.net/educational-technology-an-overview/

Nelson, S. 2017. DigiFest Keynote – Simon Nelson, CEO, FutureLearn. Student Education Conference and Digital Festival, 5 January, Leeds.

The importance of public health in the nursing curriculum

12 Dec, 16 | by dibarrett

 

Lizzie Ette – Lecturer in Nursing, University of Hull

It’s easy to imagine that public health is falling out of favour in the UK in the current era of austerity, which has ushered in cuts for local authorities, who are now predominantly responsible for the public health of their local population. With the Local Government Association (LGA) itself expressing concern and disappointment in the government’s approach to the funding of this essential remit, it would be easy to believe that improvements to public health are a fading aspiration.

However, the NHS’s own Five Year Forward Plan commits to ‘getting serious about prevention’, and cites examples of integrated models of care which are aimed at addressing health needs and promoting better health.

So what does this mean for nurses?  And what kind of nurse education do we need to deliver to ensure that future nurses are as equipped as possible to embrace and contribute to this challenging future?

determinants-of-health

more…

Finding a way through the woods: Equipping student nurses with evidence appraisal skills

29 Aug, 16 | by dibarrett

Dr David Barrett, Director of Pre-Registration Nurse Education, Faculty of Health and Social Care, University of Hull

The place of research-mindedness and evidence appraisal in pre-registration nursing curricula has been the subject of much debate and scrutiny over the decades. Though there has long been recognition that care should be evidence-based, providing student nurses with the fundamental skills required to read, appraise and apply research findings was not always a central element of predominately skills-based programmes of nurse education.

Incrementally, there has been a move towards nursing being recognised as an academic profession and not purely a skilled vocation – in the UK, this has manifested in a number of ways:

  • the move from tradition-based to evidence-based practice in the 1970s
  • the transfer of nurse ‘training’ into Higher Education in the 1990s
  • nursing programmes becoming only graduate-level (or higher) from 2011.

The Nursing and Midwifery Council in the UK recognise the importance of evidence-appraisal skills, requiring nurses who join the register to be able to “…appreciate the value of evidence in practice, be able to understand and appraise research…” (NMC, 2014)

Whilst these developments have been welcome, they only put in place the foundation for a research-minded nursing profession. Simply making nursing a Degree-level subject and teaching it in a University does not automatically produce evidence-based practitioners. However, embedding research-focused content into nurse education programmes can make a difference – Leach et al (2016) demonstrated that a research education programme for student nurses can enhance their research skills and application of evidence-based practice.

more…

Simulation: Experiential, Safe Learning in Healthcare

22 Aug, 16 | by hnoble

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Dr Ian Walsh, @Bigianbo – Queen’s University Belfast, School of Medicine i.walsh@qub.ac.uk

Simulation is encountered increasingly in healthcare education, throughout both undergraduate and postgraduate arenas. Particularly in key areas such as patient safety, it has evolved significantly from simulated clinical tasks deploying high fidelity manikins to replication of complex clinical scenarios addressing nontechnical skill issues such as communication, decision making and teamworking.

A succinct description is: “an educational technique that allows interactive, and at times immersive activity by recreating all or part of a clinical experience without exposing patients to the associated risks”1

The need for a “uniform mechanism to educate, evaluate, and certify simulation instructors for the health care profession” was recognized by McGaghie et al. in their critical review of simulation-based medical education research2.

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The #hellomynameis campaign reaches its 3rd anniversary

28 Feb, 16 | by josmith

This weeks ENB twitter chat on Wednesday the 2nd of March between 8-9pm(GMT) UK will be hosted by Kate Granger a doctor, but also a terminally ill cancer patient. and founder of the #hellomynameis campaign, and will focus on the importance of healthcare workers introducing themselves to patients. Participating in the twitter chat requires a Twitter account; if you do not already have one you can create an account at www.twitter.com. Once you have an account contributing is straightforward – follow the discussion by searching links to #ebnjc or @EBNursingBMJ, or better still, create a tweet (tweets are text messages limited to 140 characters) to @EBNursingBMJ and add #ebnjc (the EBN chat hash tag) at the end of your tweet, this allows everyone taking part to view your tweets.

Hello, my name is Kate Granger and I’m the founder of the #hellomynameis campaign, which will reach its third anniversary in August 2016.  Three years of tireless work trying to spread one simple message across the globe. Three years of trying to improve the experience for other patients all facing their own health problems. A straightforward premise that any healthcare worker who approaches a patient should first introduce themselves, with the innovative use of social media to spread the message.

more…

Student Nursing Finance

19 Jan, 16 | by Gary Mitchell, Associate Editor

On Wednesday 20th January, our #ebnjc tweet-chat focuses on the issue of student nursing finance. In advance of our chat, we are delighted to share two blogs from our two special guest hosts, Grant Byrne & Serena Ruffoni. 

image image

Click Here to Read Grant and Serena’s Guest Blogs

Mental Health of Nursing Students

30 Dec, 15 | by Gary Mitchell, Associate Editor

In our #ebnjc blog series we have already celebrated children’s nursing; with blogs from Jayne Pentin, Kirsten Huby & Marcus Wootton, learning disability nursing; with blogs from Professor Ruth Northway, Jonathan Beebee & Amy Wixey, midwifery; with blogs from Louise Silverton CBE , Gina Novick & Lynsey Wilgaus, and adult nursing from Clare McVeigh, Professor Roger Watson, Professor Jan Dewing & Professor Elizabeth Robb

This week our #ebnjc December blog series concludes with four guest blogs on mental health nursing from Neil Withnell, Jessie McGreevy, Paul Canning & Peter Jones.

Today we welcome Paul Canning, a lecturer in mental health nursing from Queen’s University Belfast, who discusses the possible unmet need in relation to the mental health of nursing students.

image

Click Here to Read Paul Canning’s Guest Blog

A Student Nurse Experience of Learning Disability Nursing

11 Dec, 15 | by Gary Mitchell, Associate Editor

This week our EBN Blog Series has focused on Learning Disability with thought-provoking blogs from Professor Ruth Northway, on nursing older people with learning disabilities and Nurse Consultant Jonathan Beebee, on the future of learning disability nursing.  Today we are delighted to share the student nurse perspective on learning disability nursing from student nurse Amy Wixey, a rising star from the University of Chester.

Amy Wixey (2)

Click Here to Read Amy’s Blog

Analysis and discussion of developments in Evidence-Based Nursing

Evidence-Based Nursing blog

Analysis and discussion of developments in Evidence-Based Nursing. Visit site



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