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Mental Health

Safeguarding Looked after Children- Does Looked After mean safe?

17 Sep, 17 | by josmith

Lin Graham-Ray Designated Nurse Looked After Children

@LinGrahamRay1

This weeks EBN Twitter chat Wednesday 20th September 2017 between 8 pm and 9 pm (UK time) on ‘Safeguarding Looked after children- Does Looked After mean safe’ will focus on the concept of safeguarding vulnerable children in the care system and challenge the conception that once in care safeguarding ends. The Twitter chat will be hosted by Lin Graham-Ray who commenced her Professional Doctorate studies in October 2015 at The Tavistock and Portman NHS Foundation Trust and is currently the Designated Nurse for Looked After Children and Care Leavers in Merton and Wandsworth CCGs.

To participate in the Twitter chat, you will need a  Twitter account. If you do not have an account, you can create one easily at www.twitter.com. Once you have an account, it is easy to get started. You can follow the discussion on Twitter by searching for #ebnjc – this is the EBN Twitter chat hashtag and by searching for this in Twitter, you’ll only see the relevant tweets related to the Twitter chat. Include #ebnjc in every tweet you send, to ensure that everyone participating in the Twitter chat can see your tweet. But remember, each tweet is limited to 140 characters of text, so make your tweets informative and concise.

Once accommodated into care children (under the age of 18) become ‘Looked After Children’ and subject to legal orders which give full, or partial legal responsibilities (depending on the type or order) to the state for their parenting. Much has been written about the poor outcomes and life chances for children in care (DfE 2015) and for the lack of support for children who stay in the care system and then progress to be care leavers. Among the main themes around poor outcomes mental health, offending and poverty feature.

The national trajectory is that we are accommodating older ‘Looked after Children’ throughout their adolescence who have experienced a range of challenges and traumas, with this in mind the chat will focus on the following questions:

  • Is it time to refocus our safeguarding thinking and challenge the concept of safe care?
  • Being ‘Looked After’ removes the child from an unsafe environment but the experience of being unsafe stays with them and their vulnerability continues, how can these children / young people be best supported?
  • Should Looked after children and care leavers who remain vulnerable despite being in the care system have more regard from health professionals?
  • Rather than defining them as hard to reach, difficult to engage or challenging, should we be challenging ourselves to see how we can deliver services to them rather than how they don’t fit into the services offered?

References

Department of Education (2015) Promoting the Health and wellbeing of Looked After Children, DfE

London.

https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/413368/Promoting_the_health_and_well-being_of_looked-after_children.pdf

Spirituality, Compassion and Mental Health

23 Jul, 17 | by josmith

Professor John Wattis, visiting Professor of Psychiatry for Older Adults at the University of Huddersfield, and Dr Melanie Rogers Senior Lecturer in the Division of Health and Rehabilitation University of Huddersfield.

The second biennial conference, organised jointly by he University of Huddersfield Spirituality Special Interest Group (SSIG), and the South West Yorkshire Partnership NHS Foundation Trust (SWYFT) explored research and practice addressing spirituality in health care. Evidence-based nursing is often seen being as all about knowledge and skills but the emphasis of this conference was on the evidence-base for the importance of good healing relationships, facilitated by approaches that recognise the value of person-centred care that demands personal qualities in nurses and time spent with patients.

The conference had a buss and excitement with 220 delegates, mainly from the UK included people who use services, students, academics and researchers. The conference was also the setting for the launch of a new book Spiritually Competent Practice in Health Care to which several of the speakers had contributed. Professor John Wattis,gave an overview of the book and Dr Melanie Rogers spoke about her research into availability and vulnerability as a way of operationalising spirituality.

Images courtesy of the University of Huddersfield

 

The main keynote speaker, former Archbishop of Canterbury Dr Rowan Williams, talked on Nourishing the spirit: relations, stories, rhythms, and drew on poetry, literature, academic research and philosophy. He stressed the importance of dependable relationships, opportunities to construct and tell our ‘stories’ and looking after our physical needs. Spiritual life needed to be grounded in our physicality. “The spiritual life is at least as much to do with knowing how to cultivate a garden or make loaf of bread as it is to do with church or chapel.”

Professor of Nursing at Staffordshire University, Wilf McSherry addressed the research around what spiritually competent practice looks like in health and social care and emphasised that it was an integral part of good practice.

Fiona Venner, Chief Executive of Leeds Survivor Led Crisis Service, followed this with a talk asking What does compassion and love look like in crisis care? stressing how important the ‘dependable other’ was, in the voluntary service she led, to the recovery of people in crisis.

Kevin Bond, former Chief Executive of NAVIGO, a social enterprise providing mental health services in NE Lincolnshire emphasised the importance of valued social roles in recovery, using principles of social role valorisation.

The final session was on creativity and spirituality from Phil Walters, Strategic Lead, and Debs Taylor, peer project development worker for Creative Minds. Debs spoke about her experiences as a service user and how important the activities and relational aspects of Creative Minds had been to her recovery.

This account is partly based on a report on the University of Huddersfield website: https://www.hud.ac.uk/news/2017/july/spiritualityinhealthcareconferencewelcomesformerarchbishop/

Seeing the Wood and the Trees: Using Construal Level Theory to see what Proxy Decision Makers are thinking about

23 Apr, 17 | by josmith

Helen Convey. Lecturer in Adult Nursing, School of Healthcare, University of Leeds

Individuals who are living with dementia and who lack decision making capacity require proxy decision makers to make decisions for them. Individuals may express their interests and desires through behaviour and verbal communication, however, memory loss results in a lack of psychological continuity between the past and the present self. When there is a conflict between the individual’s past values and interests and their present values and interests proxy decision makers encounter an ethical dilemma. The aim of this feasibility study was to explore the potential use of Construal Level Theory (CLT) as a way of analysing the thinking of proxy decision makers where this conflict occurs.

CLT (Liberman and Trope, 2014; Trope and Liberman, 2010) contends that people use mental construal to traverse psychological distance and to think about choices, alternatives and perspectives in different dimensions; temporal, spatial, social and hypothetical. In mental construal abstraction is used to move beyond direct, real experiences of the self, across psychological distance, to form a subjective view of an object or action. High-level construal is more abstract, central values receive attention. Low-level construal is concrete, detailed and contextualised.

Participants were given a scenario in one to one semi-structured interviews. They read the scenario and were asked what they were thinking and feeling. Thematic analysis was used to discover patterns of decision making. Participant responses within the themes were then analysed for abstractness of language using the Linguistic Category Model (Semin and Fiedler, 1991). Participants were found to travel across psychological distance to think abstractly about the person in the scenario. They used mostly abstract thinking to establish central values and beliefs and mostly concrete thinking to express pragmatic concerns. We concluded that CLT can be used to analyse the thinking of proxy decision makers.


References:

Liberman, N. and Trope, Y. 2014. Traversing psychological distance. Trends in Cognitive Sciences. 18(7), pp.364-369.

Semin, G.R. and Fielder, K. 1991. The Linguistic Category Model, its Bases, Applications and Range. European Review of Social Psychology. 2(1), pp.1-30.

Trope, Y. and Liberman, N. 2010. Construal-Level Theory of Psychological Distance. Psychological review. 117(2), pp.440-463.

 

 

Cognitive Behavioural Therapy and Nursing Practice

30 Oct, 16 | by rheale

This week’s EBN Twitter Chat is on Wednesday 2nd November between 8-9 pm (BST) and will be hosted by Stacey Roles (@StaceyRoles) clinical nurse specialist, Sudbury, Ontario, Canada.

Roberta Heale, (@robertaheale) Associate Editor at EBN and Associate Professor, Laurentian University School of Nursing, Sudbury, Ontario, Canada.

The Twitter chat this week will focus on a commentary written by Stacey Roles (@staceyroles) about whether combined cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) and motivational interviewing (MI) improves medication adherence.  However, given that the underlying principle of CBT is to teach the patient to identify, evaluate and respond to dysfunctional beliefs and thoughts, the implementation of it is far more widespread than this specific topic and we anticipate that the discussion encompass the broader topic of CBT.  As a form of psychotherapy, CBT focuses on problems and actions rather than unconscious meanings behind behaviours. CBT is an evidence-based and widely used treatment option.

To read @StaceyRoles commentary, please click on this link: http://ebn.bmj.com/content/19/4/124.full.pdf+html

Participating in the Twitter chat requires a Twitter account; if you do not already have one you can create an account at www.twitter.com. Once you have an account, contributing is straightforward. You can follow the discussion by searching links to #ebnjc, or contribute by creating and sending a tweet (tweets are text messages limited to 140 characters) to @EBNursingBMJ and add #ebnjc (the EBN Twitter chat hash tag) at the end of your tweet, this allows everyone taking part to view your tweets.

Questions to consider prior to the Twitter Chat:

1.     What are your experiences with patient’s response to CBT?

2.     How do you think CBT could be incorporated into your clinical setting?

3.     What adjunct therapies, if any, do you think are required in combination with CBT?

 

 

The #hellomynameis campaign reaches its 3rd anniversary

28 Feb, 16 | by josmith

This weeks ENB twitter chat on Wednesday the 2nd of March between 8-9pm(GMT) UK will be hosted by Kate Granger a doctor, but also a terminally ill cancer patient. and founder of the #hellomynameis campaign, and will focus on the importance of healthcare workers introducing themselves to patients. Participating in the twitter chat requires a Twitter account; if you do not already have one you can create an account at www.twitter.com. Once you have an account contributing is straightforward – follow the discussion by searching links to #ebnjc or @EBNursingBMJ, or better still, create a tweet (tweets are text messages limited to 140 characters) to @EBNursingBMJ and add #ebnjc (the EBN chat hash tag) at the end of your tweet, this allows everyone taking part to view your tweets.

Hello, my name is Kate Granger and I’m the founder of the #hellomynameis campaign, which will reach its third anniversary in August 2016.  Three years of tireless work trying to spread one simple message across the globe. Three years of trying to improve the experience for other patients all facing their own health problems. A straightforward premise that any healthcare worker who approaches a patient should first introduce themselves, with the innovative use of social media to spread the message.

more…

Inspiring Younger People

8 Feb, 16 | by Gary Mitchell, Associate Editor

Today we are delighted to welcome a blog from an inspiring young person, Anita Dennison.  Anita shares her experiences of setting up an anti-bullying campaign based on her own personal experiences.

Click Here to Read Anita’s Blog

Mental Health Diagnosis – Friend or Foe?

31 Jan, 16 | by atwycross

This week’s EBN Twitter Chat on Wednesday 3rd February between 8-9 pm (UK time) will focus on whether mental health diagnosis are a friend or a foe. The Twitter Chat will be hosted by Neil Withnell (‪@neilwithnell‪ ) who is a Senior Lecturer/Associate Dean Academic Enhancement at the University of Salford.

To participate in the chat you need a Twitter account; if you do not already have one you can create an account at www.twitter.com. Once you have an account contributing is straightforward, You can follow the discussion by searching links to #ebnjc or contribute by creating and sending a tweet to @EBNursingBMJ and add #ebnjc (the EBN chat hash tag) at the end of your tweet.

I remember starting my mental health nurse training over 30 years ago and the teacher explaining that nurses don’t label individuals, like doctors do. The teacher continued to explain to the six of us (yes that was the size of our group) that a label did not help as no two people were the same and symptoms varied across individuals, so we were trained to treat and respond to symptoms. I immediately knew I had made the right career choice as I wanted to work with individuals with mental health difficulties, and to challenge the stigma that this brings.

more…

Dual Legacies of a Health Career and a Baton to Match

31 Dec, 15 | by Gary Mitchell, Associate Editor

In our #ebnjc blog series we have already celebrated children’s nursing; with blogs from Jayne Pentin, Kirsten Huby & Marcus Wootton, learning disability nursing; with blogs from Professor Ruth Northway, Jonathan Beebee & Amy Wixey, midwifery; with blogs from Louise Silverton CBE , Gina Novick & Lynsey Wilgaus, and adult nursing from Clare McVeigh, Professor Roger Watson, Professor Jan Dewing & Professor Elizabeth Robb

This week our #ebnjc December blog series concludes with four guest blogs on mental health nursing from Neil Withnell, Jessie McGreevy, Paul Canning & Peter Jones.

Today we welcome Peter Jones, a community mental nurse older adults.  In today’s blog Peter discusses the dual legacies of a health career.

image

Click Here to Read Peter Jones’ Guest Blog

Mental Health of Nursing Students

30 Dec, 15 | by Gary Mitchell, Associate Editor

In our #ebnjc blog series we have already celebrated children’s nursing; with blogs from Jayne Pentin, Kirsten Huby & Marcus Wootton, learning disability nursing; with blogs from Professor Ruth Northway, Jonathan Beebee & Amy Wixey, midwifery; with blogs from Louise Silverton CBE , Gina Novick & Lynsey Wilgaus, and adult nursing from Clare McVeigh, Professor Roger Watson, Professor Jan Dewing & Professor Elizabeth Robb

This week our #ebnjc December blog series concludes with four guest blogs on mental health nursing from Neil Withnell, Jessie McGreevy, Paul Canning & Peter Jones.

Today we welcome Paul Canning, a lecturer in mental health nursing from Queen’s University Belfast, who discusses the possible unmet need in relation to the mental health of nursing students.

image

Click Here to Read Paul Canning’s Guest Blog

Therapeutic Lying in Dementia Care

29 Dec, 15 | by Gary Mitchell, Associate Editor

In our #ebnjc blog series we have already celebrated children’s nursing; with blogs from Jayne Pentin, Kirsten Huby & Marcus Wootton, learning disability nursing; with blogs from Professor Ruth Northway, Jonathan Beebee & Amy Wixey, midwifery; with blogs from Louise Silverton CBE , Gina Novick & Lynsey Wilgaus, and adult nursing from Clare McVeigh, Professor Roger Watson, Professor Jan Dewing & Professor Elizabeth Robb

This week our #ebnjc December blog series concludes with four guest blogs on mental health nursing from Neil Withnell, Jessie McGreevy, Paul Canning & Peter Jones.

Today we welcome Jessie McGreevy, a dementia care specialist from Four Seasons Health Care.  Today Jessie, a finalist in the recent Nursing Times Awards, discusses the topical issue of therapeutic lying in dementia care.

imageimage

Click Here to Read Jessie McGreevy’s Guest Blog

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