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Women with sickle cell disease carry additional risks for pregnancy

7 Mar, 17 | by josmith

Professor Allison Shorten, Director Center for Interprofessional Education and Simulation, University of Alabama, and Associate Editor Evidence-Based Nursing

 One of our most recent EBN commentaries reminds us of the health challenges faced by women with sickle cell disease globally. One of our expert commentators, Dr Eugene Oteng-Ntim from Guy’s and St Thomas’ Hospital, discusses a recent study by Bogfor et al (2016), highlighting the need for future research to address the high rates of maternal and infant morbidity and mortality associated with sickle cell disease in pregnancy. Globally, sickle cell disease is one of the most common genetic conditions, and when combined with pregnancy, risks are higher, regardless of whether women are living in low or high income countries. Read more about this recent systematic review and meta-analysis, and recommendations for health policy and clinical management.

Commentary: Oteng-Ntim, E. (2017) Pregnancy in women with sickle cell disease is associated with risk of maternal and perinatal mortality and severe morbidity, Evidence Based Nursing,

http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/eb-2016-102450

Reference:

Boafor TK, Olayemi E, Galadanci N, et al. Pregnancy outcomes in women with sickle-cell disease in low and high income countries: a systematic review and meta-analysis. BJOG 2016;123:6918.

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