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TB

World Tuberculosis Day 2016

24 Mar, 16 | by Hemali Bedi

By Hemali Bedi

Tuberculosis (TB) is one of the world’s top global health challenges. [1] It is both ptb-poster-largereventable and curable, yet in 2014, 9.6 million people contracted TB and 1.5 million died from the disease. [1] Currently, over 95% of cases and deaths occur in developing countries. [2]

March 24th marks World TB Day, which aims to increase awareness of the global burden of TB and call for political and social support to tackle the disease. [3] Co-ordinated by the World Health Organization (WHO), this day commemorates Dr Robert Koch’s discovery of the TB bacillus bacteria in 1882. [3] This year, the campaigns focus is “Unite to End TB”. [4]

WHO recognise that tackling this complex disease requires a multifactorial approach – societal, social, economic and medical factors all need to be addressed. [1] This is outlined in WHO’s 2015 Global Tuberculosis Report, which takes an in depth look at the global strategy needed to combat the epidemic.

World TB Day calls for progress in these areas and highlights the need for collaboration across sectors and disciplines to address the medical and social causes of ill health. [4]

If you would like to know more about TB, visit BMJ Case Report’s collection of TB related cases or see our Global Health Collection.

References

[1] 2015 Global Tuberculosis Report. The World Health Organization. http://apps.who.int/iris/bitstream/10665/191102/1/9789241565059_eng.pdf?ua=1 , published 2015

[2] Tuberculosis. The World Health Organization. http://www.who.int/mediacentre/factsheets/fs104/en/, published October 2015

[3] World TB Day. Stop TB Partnership. http://www.stoptb.org/events/world_tb_day/, accessed 21 March 2016

[4] World TB Day 2016: Unite to End TB. The World Health Organization. http://www.who.int/campaigns
/tb-day/2016/en/
, accessed 18 March 2016

TB: Systemic sarcoidosis with caseating granuloma

18 Oct, 12 | by Emma

In this case from Iran the authors tease out a diagnosis of TB from systemic sarcoidosis in a 58 year old woman.

Seema Biswas
Editor-in-Chief

Systemic sarcoidosis with caseating granuloma

TB: Crohn’s disease or TB – the perennial question and diagnostic pitfalls

11 Oct, 12 | by Emma

Here the authors describe a case of a non-healing perianal abscess in a patient from Saudi Arabia which finally responds to TB treatment…

Seema Biswas
Editor-in-Chief

Crohn’s disease or TB – the perennial question and diagnostic pitfalls

TB: Coincident intra-abdominal presentation of lymphoma and tuberculosis after long-term iatrogenic immunosuppression

3 Oct, 12 | by Emma

A patient on long term therapy for Crohn’s disease presents acutely with bowel obstruction. Laparotomy and bowel resection is performed. Histopathological examination reveals a sinister cause…

Seema Biswas
Editor-in-Chief

Coincident intra-abdominal presentation of lymphoma and tuberculosis after long-term iatrogenic immunosuppression

TB: Pseudodementia due to intracranial tuberculomas

20 Sep, 12 | by Emma

This report summarises a case history of a 25-year-old woman with a well known complication of tuberculosis, intracranial tuberculoma, manifest clinically with a depressed conscious level and cognitive slowness (“pseudodementia”) a few months after the initiation of anti-TB therapy. CT scan showed several tuberculoma with surrounding oedema. After re-institution of prednisolone the symptoms subside. The learning points, as stated by the authors, are that tuberculoma need not present with focal neurological sequelae and that reversible causes for declining cognitive function should be carefully sought and corrected.

Reviewer
Kirsten Moller

Pseudodementia due to intracranial tuberculomas: an unusual presentation

TB: Paraspinal sinuses? Do remember renal tuberculosis.

13 Sep, 12 | by Emma

Declared a global health emergency by the World Health Organisation in 1993, over one third of population of the world is infected with TB and 7% of all deaths in the developing world are attributed to TB.  We present a series of cases that illustrate the varied presentations of TB.

————————————————————————————————-
A small proportion of patients with pulmonary TB develop infection of the genitourinary system. Here the authors report the case of a young woman in India with low back pain and fever…

Seema Biswas
Editor-in-Chief

Paraspinal sinuses? Do remember renal tuberculosis.

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