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Archive for July, 2012

The ‘Berlin Patient’ ‘cured’ of HIV

27 Jul, 12 | by Dr Dean Jenkins

The so-called ‘Berlin Patient’ has been in the news again as he has now reached 5 years of being clear of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 (HIV). Timothy Ray Brown has been interviewed on vaious media outlets giving his remarkable story.

http://cnnpressroom.blogs.cnn.com/2012/07/24/timothy-ray-brown-to-sanjay-gupta-hiv-completely-gone/

He was HIV positive but later developed acute myeloid leukaemia which hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation. His tissue type matched a large number of donors one of which had natural resitance to HIV infection – an ‘elite controller’. His case was reported in The Scientific World Journal last year. A recent JAMA article gives a good overview of ‘elite controllers’.

This fascinating case raises a number of hopes about the future management of HIV infection. The current research is centred (still) on finding an effective vaccine and continuing the success of antiretroviral therapy.

Biliary disease: Utilisation of cholecystostomy and cystic duct as a route for percutaneous cutting balloon papillotomy and expulsion of common bile duct stones

26 Jul, 12 | by Emma

Here the authors discuss the treatment of obstructing bile duct stones in a novel approach where the patient presents with an empyema of the gallbladder.

Seema Biswas
Editor-in-Chief

Utilisation of cholecystostomy and cystic duct as a route for percutaneous cutting balloon papillotomy and expulsion of common bile duct stones

Clinical Anatomy: Irreversible airway obstruction due to innominate artery compression of the trachea

11 Jul, 12 | by Emma

When is reversible obstructive airways disease not reversible? Here the authors describe how their investigations lead to an anatomical explanation.

Seema Biswas
Editor-in-Chief

Irreversible airway obstruction due to innominate artery compression of the trachea

 

Clinical Anatomy: Pancreatico-psoas fistula – a rare complication of acute pancreatitis

4 Jul, 12 | by Emma

Clinical Anatomy

The purpose of an integrated modular medical curriculum is to place basic science in a clinical context where the relevance of a multitude of medical facts is made clear to students. The facts then become memorable. How often does this really happen, though, in individual student learning? In this series of case reports we hope to illustrate the relevance of clinical anatomy and present to you some memorable images with explanations of how patients develop symptoms as anatomical pathology arises.

We lead off with this case. ERCP may be complicated by acute pancreatitis. Retroperitoneal complications of pancreatitis may ensue. Here are some spectacular pictures which describe the process.

Seema Biswas
Editor-in-Chief

Pancreatico-psoas fistula: a rare complication of acute pancreatitis

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