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Top 10 Most Read in July: Link Worker social prescribing, best practice in sex and relationship education, and menstrual hygiene management among Bangladeshi adolescent schoolgirls

14 Aug, 17 | by Emma Gray

Image result for colourful condoms

An assortment of study designs made it into the Top 10 Most Read articles in July: among the popular studies were a systematic review, a protocol for a prospective observational study, and a qualitative study of service user perceptions.

At number one this month is a longitudinal cohort study by Xie et al examining the association between Proton Pump Inhibitors and the risk of all-cause mortality. Moffatt et al enter the chart at number two with their study on Link Worker social prescribing to improve health and well-being for people with long-term conditions. Undertaking a qualitative study using semistructured interviews with thematic analysis, they seek to describe the experiences of patients with long-term conditions who are referred to and engage with a Link Worker social prescribing programme and identify the impact of this programme.

Reaching number three this month is a study from Pound et al looking at what makes sex and education programmes effective, acceptable and sustainable. At number four is a systematic review investigating how different terminology used for the same condition can influence management preferences and psychological outcomes, concluding that changing the terminology used may be one strategy to reduce patient preferences for aggressive management responses to low-risk conditions. A cross-sectional study on the use of snus and its association with respiratory and sleep-related symptoms remains in the top ten this month at number six, while at number ten we have a new entry from Bangladesh examining the association of menstrual hygiene management knowledge, facilities and practice with absence from school during menstruation among Bangladeshi schoolgirls.

Rank Author(s) Title
1 Xie et al. Risk of death among users of Proton Pump Inhibitors: a longitudinal observational cohort study of United States veterans
2 Moffatt et al. Link Worker social prescribing to improve health and well-being for people with long-term conditions: qualitative study of service user perceptions
3 Pound et al.
4 Nickel et al. Words do matter: a systematic review on how different terminology for the same condition influences management preferences
5 Rambaud et al. Criteria for Return to Sport after Anterior Cruciate Ligament reconstruction with lower reinjury risk (CRSTAL study): protocol for a prospective observational study in France
6 Gudnadóttir et al. An investigation on the use of snus and its association with respiratory and sleep-related symptoms: a cross-sectional population study
7 Ooba et al. Lipid-lowering drugs and risk of new-onset diabetes: a cohort study using Japanese healthcare data linked to clinical data for health screening
8 Kennedy et al. Coffee, including caffeinated and decaffeinated coffee, and the risk of hepatocellular carcinoma: a systematic review and dose-response meta-analysis
9 Fabbri et al. A cross-sectional analysis of pharmaceutical industry-funded events for health professionals in Australia
10 Alam et al. Menstrual hygiene management among Bangladeshi adolescent schoolgirls and risk factors affecting school absence: results from a cross-sectional survey

Most read figures are based on pdf downloads and full text views. Abstract views are excluded.

Top 10 Most Read in June: snus and snoring, long-term antibiotic treatment in times of resistance, the success of the NIHR Academic Clinical Fellowship, and serious video gaming for coping with pain

7 Jul, 17 | by Yaiza del Pozo Martin

Six new articles made their way up to the Top 10 Most Read list of BMJ Open in June. Maintaining the top position for the second consecutive month is the systematic review and meta-analysis by Oliver Kennedy and colleagues establishing an association between coffee consumption and reduced risk of hepatocellular carcinoma, the most common type of liver cancer. The study suggests that drinking two cups of caffeinated coffee or more per day can reduce the risk of developing liver cancer. The authors also include for the first time in this type of analysis decaffeinated coffee, finding a similar but weaker positive association.

At number two, making its way to the top, is a new entry associating snus, a moist powder tobacco product shown in the image below, with a higher occurrence of common respiratory conditions such as asthma and snoring. Previous studies examining the health impact of this type of moist oral tobacco were contradictory; therefore Gudnadóttir and colleagues conducted a survey in a large population living in Sweden to shed some light on this issue. The study found that snus use by never-smokers was associated with a higher risk of developing asthma and respiratory conditions. Snoring and difficulty to fall asleep was equally related to both, former and current users of snus.

At number six, a systematic review and meta-analysis by Ahmed and colleagues compiling evidence from three clinical trials shows that long-term antibiotic therapy can prevent recurrent urinary tract infection in old adults. This study is timely given that nowadays, with antibiotic resistance on the rise, antibiotic use must be justified by robust evidence.

Among the other new entries last month is a retrospective analysis assessing the impact of the NIHR Academic Clinical Fellowship (ACF) scheme on clinical academic careers in England over the last 10 years. The Integrated Academic Training Programme was launched in October 2005 by the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) to provide predoctoral academic training during the specialty training period for doctors and dentists. The researchers found that trainee doctors undertaking this fellowship were more likely to secure an externally funded doctoral training award and the vast majority of awardees move into academic roles, with many completing PhDs. The study concludes that the NIHR ACF scheme is successful as part of an integrated training pathway in developing careers in academic medicine and dentistry.

Finally, at the bottom of the list, is a protocol describing a mixed-methods study to evaluate whether serious video games, as part of a multidisciplinary rehabilitation intervention, can improve the health outcomes of patients with complex chronic pain and fatigue complaints. ‘Serious games’ are video games developed to promote health benefits. Previous studies have shown that different serious games can improve motivation for physical activity and cognitive stimulation.  In this study protocol, Vugts and colleagues propose a new serious game called LAKA that aims to facilitate patient learning about living with complex chronic pain. The study is still ongoing, but the upcoming results may determine whether improvements in pain intensity, pain coping and fatigue in people with chronic pain can be attributed to serious gaming.

 

Rank Author(s) Title
1 Kennedy et al. Coffee, including caffeinated and decaffeinated coffee, and the risk of hepatocellular carcinoma: a systematic review and dose-response meta-analysis
2 Gudnadóttir et al. An investigation on the use of snus and its association with respiratory and sleep-related symptoms: a cross-sectional population study
3 Ferrando et al. The accuracy of postoperative, non-invasive Air-Test to diagnose atelectasis in healthy patients after surgery: a prospective, diagnostic pilot study
4 Brignardello-Petersen et al. Knee arthroscopy versus conservative management in patients with degenerative knee disease: a systematic review
5 Bjellmo et al. Is vaginal breech delivery associated with higher risk for perinatal death and cerebral palsy compared with vaginal cephalic birth? Registry-based cohort study in Norway
6 Ahmed et al. Long-term antibiotics for prevention of recurrent urinary tract infection in older adults: systematic review and meta-analysis of randomised trials
7 Albarqouni et al. The quality of reports of medical and public health research from Palestinian institutions: a systematic review
8 Clough et al.  What impact has the NIHR Academic Clinical Fellowship (ACF) scheme had on clinical academic careers in England over the last 10 years? A retrospective study
9 Gartlehner et al. Pharmacological and non-pharmacological treatments for major depressive disorder: review of systematic reviews
10 Vugts et al. Serious gaming during multidisciplinary rehabilitation for patients with complex chronic pain or fatigue complaints: study protocol for a controlled trial and process evaluation

*Most read figures are based on pdf downloads and full text views. Abstract views are excluded.

Top 10 Most Read in March: Caesarean section and for-profit status of hospitals, mental health links to diet, and weight discrimination

10 Apr, 17 | by Emma Gray

Caesarean sections and for-profit status of hospitals, the link between diet and mental health, and the effect of weight discrimination on physical activity

File:Fruits and Vegetables at Pike Place Market.jpg

The Top 10 Most Read articles in March showed great variety in topics and study types. In the top spot this month is a systematic review and meta-analysis by Hoxha et al discussing the association of for-profit status of a hospital and the odds of a woman having a caesarean section. Nguyen et al, at number four, undertake a cross-sectional study to investigate the association between fruit and vegetable consumption and the prevalence of psychological distress in middle-ages and older Australians, finding that there is potential for increased fruit and vegetable consumption in helping to reduce psychological distress. Reaching number seven this month is a study looking at the association between perceived weight discrimination and physical activity, by Jackson and Steptoe of UCL. At number eight this month we see a clinical trial comparing flucloxacillin with clindamycin to flucloxacillin alone for the treatment of limb cellulitis, while at number ten we have a pilot study carried out to inform the design of a future trial to determine the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of a pharmacist-delivered medicines reconciliation service.

Rank Author(s) Title
1 Hoxha et al. Caesarean sections and for-profit status of hospitals: systematic review and meta-analysis
2 Burt et al. Understanding negative feedback from South Asian patients: an experimental vignette study
3 Ravnskov et al.
4 Nguyen et al. Fruit and vegetable consumption and psychological distress: cross-sectional and longitudinal analyses based on a large Australian sample
5 Williams et al. Childhood academic ability in relation to cigarette, alcohol and cannabis use from adolescence into early adulthood: Longitudinal Study of Young People in England (LSYPE)
6 Fenton et al. Systematic review of the association between dietary acid load, alkaline water and cancer
7 Jackson et al. Association between perceived weight discrimination and physical activity: a population-based study among English middle-aged and older adults
8 Brindle et al. Adjunctive clindamycin for cellulitis: a clinical trial comparing flucloxacillin with or without clindamycin for the treatment of limb cellulitis
9 Abraha et al. Systematic review of systematic reviews of non-pharmacological interventions to treat behavioural disturbances in older patients with dementia. The SENATOR-OnTop series
10 Cadman et al. Pharmacist provided medicines reconciliation within 24 hours of admission and on discharge: a randomised controlled pilot study

Most read figures are based on pdf downloads and full text views. Abstract views are excluded.

Top 10 Most Read: Negative primary care feedback from minority ethnic patients, higher caesarean sections in for-profit hospitals, adolescents’ sex and drug habits, and biased psychology

13 Mar, 17 | by Yaiza del Pozo Martin

 

 

February sees five new entries in the top 10 most read articles. At number one this month is an experimental vignette study investigating why minority ethnic groups report poorer primary care experience in patient surveys. Burt and colleagues designed an experiment in the UK to determine whether South Asian people rate simulated GP consultations the same or differently from White British. The findings suggest that the lower scores reported by Pakistani patients in national surveys represent genuinely worse experiences of communication compared to the White British majority.

Making its way up to the top and catching significant online attention, is a systematic review exploring whether researchers’ conflicts of interest are adequately reported in publications related to psychological therapies. The authors show that non-financial conflicts of interests, especially the inclusion of own primary studies and researcher allegiance, are frequently seen in systematic reviews in the field of psychology.

At number five, another systematic review and meta-analysis exploring the connections between caesarean sections and for-profit status of hospitals. Hoxha and colleagues establish that regardless of women’s risk and contextual factors, private for-profit hospitals are more likely to perform caesarean interventions to women as compared with non for profit hospitals. The authors recommend examining the incentive structures of for-profit hospitals to set strategies that encourage appropriate provision of caesarean sections.

Other new entries on February include two research papers looking at adolescent’s behaviours. The first one is an interesting epidemiological study concluding that brainy adolescents are at a reduced risk of cigarette smoking, but are more likely to drink alcohol regularly and use cannabis. The second on is a qualitative study exploring the views and experiences of young people about their school-based sex and relationship education.

The two most read articles the previous month, systematic reviews by Ravnskov et al. and Fenton et al., stay up in the ranking at the second and third positions respectively. January’s highlight article, a cohort study by Anick Bérard and colleagues indicating that antidepressants increase the risk of a wide range of organ-specific malformations, continues halfway through the ranking. Also, an enlightening survey by Boulton and colleagues reporting the unacceptably high amount of sugars hidden in drinks marketed to children continues to be highly read.

Finally, the cross-sectional study by Murdoch and colleagues investigating the lack of evidence and efficacy, and potential harmful effects, of a clinic website in Canada offering naturopathy, homeopathy, chiropractic and acupuncture to treat serious conditions such as allergy and asthma, continues to grow in popularity online. In light of the results, the authors call for a policy response to safeguard the public interest. We would like to take this opportunity to direct you to: Should doctors recommend homeopathy?

 

Rank Author(s) Title
1 Burt et al. Understanding negative feedback from South Asian patients: an experimental vignette study
2 Ravnskov et al. Lack of an association or an inverse association between low-density-lipoprotein cholesterol and mortality in the elderly: a systematic review
3  Fenton et al. Systematic review of the association between dietary acid load, alkaline water and cancer
4  Lieb et al. Conflicts of interest and spin in reviews of psychological therapies: a systematic review
5 Hoxha et al. Caesarean sections and for-profit status of hospitals: systematic review and meta-analysis
6 Bérard et al. Antidepressant use during pregnancy and the risk of major congenital malformations in a cohort of depressed pregnant women: an updated analysis of the Quebec Pregnancy Cohort
7 Murdoch et al. Selling falsehoods? A cross-sectional study of Canadian naturopathy, homeopathy, chiropractic and acupuncture clinic website claims relating to allergy and asthma
8 Pound et al.  What do young people think about their school-based sex and relationship education? A qualitative synthesis of young people’s views and experiences
9 Boulton et al. How much sugar is hidden in drinks marketed to children? A survey of fruit juices, juice drinks and smoothies
10 Williams et al. Childhood academic ability in relation to cigarette, alcohol and cannabis use from adolescence into early adulthood: Longitudinal Study of Young People in England (LSYPE)

*Most read figures are based on pdf downloads and full text views. Abstract views are excluded.

BMJ Open: highlights from 2016 in review

19 Jan, 17 | by Yaiza del Pozo Martin

In 2011 BMJ Open appeared on the medical publishing scene becoming, in only five years, the world’s largest general medical journal (2015 – Five years old and growing). Another year has passed since then, and thanks to defining our distinctive identity, and being rigorous, open and transparent, we have continued to grow consistently and steadily, publishing over 2000 articles last year.

To celebrate this new milestone in our ongoing journey, we are highlighting a selection of articles that gained significant attention in 2016 and exemplify BMJ Open’s unique approach.

 

Alcohol use: closure of the male-female gap

Systematic review – Addiction

The article that received the highest Altmetric score (1618) last year is a systematic review and meta-regression analysis confirming the closing male-female gap in alcohol use and its related harms. According to the latest Global report on alcohol and health of the WHO, in 2012, about 3.3 million deaths, 5.9% of all global deaths, were attributable to alcohol consumption. As explained in the article by Slade and colleagues from the National Drug and Alcohol Research Centre in Australia, historically, the prevalence of alcohol use and related harms has been between 2 and 12 times higher in men than women. However, the emerging evidence collected in recent decades suggests that alcohol use has changed in younger generations towards closing the male-female gap, and this is indeed what this systematic review of published literature shows.  Beyond confirming the premise, this analysis highlights the importance of working on reducing the harmful use of alcohol in both male and female youngsters as they age to prevent further deleterious effects.

Along the same lines reads this noteworthy article published last week in our Communications section. The authors explored how the UK media and online news represent women’s and men’s drinking habits to identify ways of better aligning news reporting of harmful drinking with the current evidence drawn by studies such as the one above, and the latest UK alcohol guidelines, which are gender-neutral in their recommendations. Patterson and colleagues show that the image the UK media presents of women’s ‘binge’ drinking is at odds with the existing epidemiological evidence, and may reinforce unrealistic gender stereotypes and hinder public compliance of the neutral-gender weekly alcohol consumption limits. The report emphasizes the need to engage with the media to shift its framing of ‘binge’ drinking away from specific groups and contexts, and focus it instead on the health risks of specific drinking behaviours.

Slade et al. updated Altmetrics

Patterson et al. updated Altmetrics

 

 

Confident fathers have happier children

Longitudinal observational study – Paediatrics

The third most disseminated article of last year with an Altmetric score of 1076 set out to explore the influence of paternal involvement in early child-rearing and its potential impact on the children’s pre-adolescent behavioural outcomes.

The study included more than 10,000 children that lived with both parents during the first year of age. The researchers evaluated paternal involvement during this year through fathers’ emotional response to the child; the frequency of fathers’ involvement in domestic and childcare activities; and fathers’ feelings of security in their role as parent and partner. The outcome of early paternal involvement was measured assessing the behaviour of the children as they reached 9 and 11 years of age. This long term analysis allowed Opondo and colleagues to establish that rather than the quantity of direct involvement in childcare, it is the psychological and emotional paternal involvement in children’s early upbringing, that associates with positive behavioural outcomes in children. Particularly, how new fathers see themselves as parents and adjust to the role seems to be a key factor for successful parenting.

Opondo et al. updated Altmetrics

 

 

Sweet end: ultra-processed foods and drinks

Observational studies – Nutrition and metabolism

Two enlightening observational studies published in BMJ Open last year revealed two of the main dietary sources of added sugar and emphasized the need to reduce their consumption to control weight gain, caries, and the risk of diabetes and cardiovascular disease.

The first study by Martinez-Steele and colleagues showed that ultra-processed foods, containing five times the content of added sugars than minimally processed foods, make up almost 60% of the calories and 90% of the added sugars consumed in the US. The second study, conducted in the UK, investigated the amount of sugars in fruit juices, juice drinks and smoothies marketed to children. The researchers determined that the mean sugars content in drinks marketed to children was 7 g/100 ml, which is ‘unacceptably high’ as expressed by the authors.

Source: Pixabay – Licensed under Creative Commons CC0 1.0.

The new updated WHO guideline on Sugars intake for adults and children calls for a further reduction of free sugars intake to less than 5% of total energy intake, and as demonstrated by these studies, avoiding ultra-processed foods and drinks is crucial to attain this goal.

Martinez-Steele et al. updated Altmetrics

Boulton et al. updated Altmetrics

 

 

How many failed attempts it takes to quit smoking?

Longitudinal cohort study – Addiction

Tobacco use is one of the main risk factors for a number of chronic conditions, including cancer, lung diseases, and cardiovascular disorders, and the number one cause of preventable mortality (WHO report on the global tobacco epidemic 2015). Despite the extensive awareness of the negative effects of tobacco in our health, millions worldwide continue to smoke. This is partly explained by the difficulty it takes to quit this habit, which is clearly illustrated in this quote of Mark Twain, ‘Quitting smoking is easy: I’ve done it thousands of times’.

This popular study published in BMJ Open aimed to provide a realistic approximation of the estimate number of quit attempts prior to quitting successfully, including in the analyses both successful and unsuccessful quitters. Applying different analyses to the data collected by the Ontario Tobacco Survey, the authors concluded that before quitting successfully, 30 attempts are made on average. This study helps assisting the clinical expectations of doctors and smokers alike, and establishes for the first time that for many smokers it may take 30 or more quit attempts before being successful. These striking results suggest that further increasing the frequency of these attempts could be decisive in reducing smoking prevalence.

Chaiton et al. updated Altmetrics

 

 

‘You can’t be a person and a doctor’

Qualitative research article – Medical education and training

BMJ Open has carved out a niche in qualitative research, and one of the recent highlights in this type of study design investigated the work-life balance of doctors undertaking postgraduate medical training in the UK. Generally, medical trainees spend long hours at work typically supplemented with revision and completion of other training duties. In this timely qualitative analysis published at the end of the year, researchers conducted focus groups and interviews with medical trainees and trainers exposing a lack of work-life balance that negatively impacts on the learning and well-being of medical students. Particularly, this work-life imbalance affected those with children and especially women who faced a lack of less-than-full-time positions and discriminatory attitudes.

Credit: Dr. Farouk – Licensed under Creative Commons 2.0.

 

The study revealed that to buffer some pressure of the demanding training, the profession should be looking at structural factors, such as developing a strong social support network, both fostering positive relationships at work and those with family and friends outside work, in order to reduce burnout and improve the well-being of medical trainees.

Rich et al. updated Altmetrics

 

Top 10 most read: Work-life balance of doctors in training, ultra-processed foods and added sugars in the US diet, and quality of life and visual function in patients with age-related macular degeneration

4 Jan, 17 | by Hemali Bedi

December’s top 10 most read list sees eight new entries. At number one this month is a qualitative study by Rich et al, which investigates the work-life balance of doctors undertaking post graduate mTired Docedical training in the UK. The authors conducted semistructured focus groups and interviews with medical trainees and trainers and found a lack of work life balance that negatively impacts on learning and well-being. In particular, women with children were the most affected.

Other new entries include a cross sectional study by Steele et al, which found that ultra-processed foods make up over half of all calories consumed in the US diet, and contribute to almost 90% of all added sugar intake. This study also received a press release.

Fenton et al’s systematic review on the associations between dietary acid, alkaline water and cancer incidence and treatment outcomes has dropped to fifth place in this month’s list. Jonas et al reached number six with a systematic review and meta-analysis examining the efficacy of surgery and invasive procedures for various conditions. The study concludes that the effects of surgery and other invasive procedures are uncertain, particularly in pain-related conditions.

Finally, at number 10 this month is a systematic review by Taylor et al, which looks into the affect of age-related macular degeneration (AMD) on visual function and quality of life (QoL) in patients living with the condition.

Rank Author(s) Title
1 Rich et al. “You can’t be a person and a doctor”: the work-life balance of doctors in training – a qualitative study
2 Ravnskov et al. Lack of an association or an inverse association between low-density-lipoprotein cholesterol and mortality in the elderly: a systematic review
3 Steele et al. Ultra-processed foods and added sugars in the US diet: evidence from a nationally representative cross-sectional study
4 Murdoch et al. Selling falsehoods? A cross-sectional study of Canadian naturopathy, homeopathy, chiropractic and acupuncture clinic website claims relating to allergy and asthma
5 Fenton et al. Systematic review of the association between dietary acid load, alkaline water and cancer
6 Leary et al. Mining routinely collected acute data to reveal non-linear relationships between nurse staffing levels and outcomes
7 Jonas et al. To what extent are surgery and invasive procedures effective beyond a placebo response? A systematic review with meta-analysis of randomised, sham controlled trials
8 Opondo et al.  Father involvement in early child-rearing and behavioural outcomes in their pre-adolescent children: evidence from the ALSPAC UK birth cohort
9 Oliva et al. Gut feelings in the diagnostic process of Spanish GPs: a focus group study
10 Taylor et al. How does age-related macular degeneration affect real-world visual ability and quality of life? A systematic review

Most read figures are based on pdf downloads and full text views. Abstract views are excluded.

Paternal involvement in child-rearing, health anxiety, and the global epidemiology of alcohol use: Most read articles in November

9 Dec, 16 | by Emma Gray

Paternal involvement in early child-rearing, health anxiety and risk of ischaemic heart disease, and the global epidemiology of alcohol use

The Top 10 Most Read list for November contains a number of new entries including papers on the reasons for retraction of articles, and the relationship between earlobe creases and coronary artery disease. At number one this month is a longitudinal study by Reece et al, which looks into the possibility that cannabis-exposed patients may be ageing more quickly. Entering the list at four and five respectively, are Farren et al and Berge et al with studies on the emotional distress in women after early pregnancy loss and the prospective association of health anxiety with ischaemic heart disease. A study on the involvement of fathers in early child-rearing on behaviour and development in their pre-adolescent children by Opondo et al reaches number six, finding that psychological and emotional aspects of paternal involvement in children’s early upbringing, particularly how new fathers see themselves as parents and adjust to the role, is associated with positive outcomes in children. It also received a press release and some attention on social media. Finally, returning at number eight this month, we have a popular article on birth cohort trends in the global epidemiology of alcohol use and alcohol-related harms in men and women by Slade et al, which concludes that the male-female gap in indicators of alcohol use and related harms is closing.

Rank Author(s) Title
1 Reece et al. Cannabis exposure as an interactive cardiovascular risk factor and accelerant of organismal ageing: a longitudinal study
2 Ravnskov et al. Lack of an association or an inverse association between low-density-lipoprotein cholesterol and mortality in the elderly: a systematic review
3 Spoelman et al. Effect of an evidence-based website on healthcare usage: an interrupted time-series study
4 Farren et al. Post-traumatic stress, anxiety and depression following miscarriage or ectopic pregnancy: a prospective cohort study
5 Berge et al. Health anxiety and risk of ischaemic heart disease: a prospective cohort study linking the Hordaland Health Study (HUSK) with the Cardiovascular Diseases in Norway (CVDNOR) project
6 Opondo et al. Father involvement in early child-rearing and behavioural outcomes in their pre-adolescent children: evidence from the ALSPAC UK birth cohort
7 Wang et al. Relationship between diagonal earlobe creases and coronary artery disease as determined via angiography
8 Slade et al. Birth cohort trends in the global epidemiology of alcohol use and alcohol-related harms in men and women: systematic review and metaregression
9 Hashem et al. Cross-sectional survey of the amount of free sugars and calories in carbonated sugar-sweetened beverages on sale in the UK
10 Moylan et al. Why articles are retracted: a retrospective cross-sectional study of retraction notices at BioMed Central

Most read figures are based on pdf downloads and full text views. Abstract views are excluded.

Volunteering and mental health, breast feeding outcomes and condom use intentions: Most read articles in August

7 Sep, 16 | by Emma Gray

Association of volunteering and mental well-being, breast feeding outcomes and place of birth, and condom use intentions of heterosexual men

File:FEMA - 15337 - Photograph by Andrea Booher taken on 09-10-2005 in Texas.jpg

The August most read list contains papers with a number of different study designs, on a number of different topics. Returning to the top spot this month is a systematic review on the lack of an association or an inverse association between low-density-lipoprotein cholesterol and mortality in the elderly, by Ravnskov et al. At numbers three and six respectively, we have Quigley et al with a cross-sectional study examining the association between breast feeding outcomes and place of birth, and Tabassum et al with a study on the association of volunteering with mental well-being which also received a press release. Levett et al come in at number eight with randomised controlled trial which concludes that an antenatal integrative medicine education programme in addition to usual care significantly reduced epidural use and caesarean section in nulliparous women. Finally, at number ten is an experimental study by Eleftheriou et al looking at the influence of attractiveness on the condom use intentions of heterosexual men.

Rank Author(s) Title
1 Ravnskov et al. Lack of an association or an inverse association between low-density-lipoprotein cholesterol and mortality in the elderly: a systematic review
2 Kristensen et al. The effect of statins on average survival in randomised trials, an analysis of end point postponement
3 Quigley et al. Association between home birth and breast feeding outcomes: a cross-sectional study in 28 125 mother-infant pairs from Ireland and the UK
4 Teschke et al. Bicycling injury hospitalisation rates in Canadian jurisdictions: analyses examining associations with helmet legislation and mode share
5 Hill et al. Development and initial cohort validation of the Arthritis Research UK Musculoskeletal Health Questionnaire (MSK-HQ) for use across musculoskeletal care pathways
6 Tabassum et al. Association of volunteering with mental well-being: a lifecourse analysis of a national population-based longitudinal study in the UK
7 Smyth et al. Identification of adults with sepsis in the prehospital environment: a systematic review
8 Levett et al. Complementary therapies for labour and birth study: a randomised controlled trial of antenatal integrative medicine for pain management in labour
9 Jaber et al. New method of preoxygenation for orotracheal intubation in patients with hypoxaemic acute respiratory failure in the intensive care unit, non-invasive ventilation combined with apnoeic oxygenation by high flow nasal oxygen: the randomised OPTINIV study protocol
10 Eleftheriou et al. Does attractiveness influence condom use intentions in heterosexual men? An experimental study

Most read figures are based on pdf downloads and full text views. Abstract views are excluded.

Complimentary therapies, well-being and consultants as victims of bullying: Most read articles in July.

11 Aug, 16 | by Fay Pearson

 Tired Doc

July’s top 10 most read papers sees two studies taking into account doctors’ points of view. The first, by Bourne et al., takes a closer look at look at which aspects of the complaints process they find the most stressful. The second, by Shabazz et al., uses a survey of Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists to explore how significant numbers of consultants in the UK are victims of bullying.

We also have a study by Linton et al., that systematically reviews self-report measures for assessing well-being, and a randomised controlled trial by Levett et al., that concludes that the use of complementary therapies during birth can significantly reduce usage of epidurals and cesarean sections.

Rank Author(s) Title
1  Ravnskov et al. Lack of an association or an inverse association between low-density-lipoprotein cholesterol and mortality in the elderly: a systematic review
2 Levett, et al. Complementary therapies for labour and birth study: a randomised controlled trial of antenatal integrative medicine for pain management in labour
3 Eleftheriou et al. Does attractiveness influence condom use intentions in heterosexual men? An experimental study
4 Bourne et al. Doctors’ experiences and their perception of the most stressful aspects of complaints processes in the UK: an analysis of qualitative survey data
5 Teschke et al. Bicycling injury hospitalisation rates in Canadian jurisdictions: analyses examining associations with helmet legislation and mode share
6 Kristensen et al. The effect of statins on average survival in randomised trials, an analysis of end point postponement
7 Shabazz,et al. Consultants as victims of bullying and undermining: a survey of Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists consultant experiences
8 Oudin et al. Association between neighbourhood air pollution concentrations and dispensed medication for psychiatric disorders in a large longitudinal cohort of Swedish children and adolescents
9 Tsubokura et al. Estimated association between dwelling soil contamination and internal radiation contamination levels after the 2011 Fukushima Daiichi nuclear accident in Japan
10 Linton et al. Review of 99 self-report measures for assessing well-being in adults: exploring dimensions of well-being and developments over time

Prolonged sitting, non-fatal self-harm, and institutional mental healthcare: Most read articles in May

6 Jun, 16 | by Emma Gray

Prolonged sitting and fatigue, non-fatal self-harm, and trends in institutional mental healthcare in Western Europe

File:Une femme lisant à la biblothèque des Champs Libres de Rennes.jpg

This month sees a mixture of some old favourites and some new entries in the Top 10 Most Read list. First up is a pilot study by Wennberg et al which uses a randomised two-condition crossover trial to compare the acute effects of uninterrupted sitting with sitting interrupted by brief bouts of light-intensity walking on self-reported fatigue, cognition, neuroendocrine biomarkers and cardiometabolic risk markers in overweight and obese adults. Kristensen et al‘s paper on the effect of statins remains popular at number two this month and at number four we have an observational study by Geulayov et al which received a press release – it examines trends in non-fatal self-harm and its management in England. In at number five this month is a study by Chow et al investigating how institutional mental healthcare has changed in Western Europe since 1990, finding that there are ongoing overall trends of a decrease in the number of psychiatric hospital beds and an increase in the number of places in other institutions, including prisons. Last month’s most read paper by Gunn et al remains in the top ten, and at number ten we have a new entry by Laver et al with a systematic review of systematic reviews, assessing the effects of interventions to delay functional decline in people with dementia.

Rank Author(s) Title
1 Wennberg et al. Acute effects of breaking up prolonged sitting on fatigue and cognition: a pilot study
2 Kristensen et al. The effect of statins on average survival in randomised trials, an analysis of end point postponement
3 Teschke et al. Bicycling injury hospitalisation rates in Canadian jurisdictions: analyses examining associations with helmet legislation and mode share
4 Geulayov et al. Epidemiology and trends in non-fatal self-harm in three centres in England, 2000–2012: findings from the Multicentre Study of Self-harm in England
5 Chow et al. How has the extent of institutional mental healthcare changed in Western Europe? Analysis of data since 1990
6 Dickstein et al. Multicentre open-label randomised controlled trial to compare colistin alone with colistin plus meropenem for the treatment of severe infections caused by carbapenem-resistant Gram-negative infections (AIDA): a study protocol
7 Martinez Steele et al. Ultra-processed foods and added sugars in the US diet: evidence from a nationally representative cross-sectional study
8 Gunn et al. Prenatal exposure to cannabis and maternal and child health outcomes: a systematic review and meta-analysis
9 Hirono et al. Is health impact assessment useful in the context of trade negotiations? A case study of the Trans Pacific Partnership Agreement
10 Laver et al. Interventions to delay functional decline in people with dementia: a systematic review of systematic reviews

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