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Baldness, marathon running and lower back pain: Most read articles in April

7 May, 13 | by Assistant Editor

 

The most-read article in April was Yamada and colleagues’ analysis of male pattern baldness and coronary heart disease, which received widespread press coverage. Also popular was Küster et al‘s study highlighting the dangers of consuming over the counter analgesics before running a marathon which was also covered in the press in the run-up to the London marathon this month. Other newly-published papers in the top ten include Lin et al‘s study of lower back pain and Mahtani et al‘s study on sport participation following the Olympics.

Rank Author(s) Title
1 Yamada et al Male pattern baldness and its association with coronary heart disease: a meta-analysis
2 Küster et al Consumption of analgesics before a marathon and the incidence of cardiovascular, gastrointestinal and renal problems: a cohort study
3 Clar et al Systematic review of SGLT2 receptor inhibitors in dual or triple therapy in type 2 diabetes
4 Bardsley et al Is secondary preventive care improving? Observational study of 10-year trends in emergency admissions for conditions amenable to ambulatory care
5 Doyle et al A systematic review of evidence on the links between patient experience and clinical safety and effectiveness
6 Lin et al Disabling chronic low back pain as an iatrogenic disorder: a qualitative study in Aboriginal Australians
7 Mahtani et al Can the London 2012 Olympics ‘inspire a generation’ to do more physical or sporting activities? An overview of systematic reviews
8 Katzmarzyk et al Sedentary behaviour and life expectancy in the USA: a cause-deleted life table analysis
9 Ekstrom et al Aspirin treatment and risk of first incident cardiovascular diseases in patients with type 2 diabetes: an observational study from the Swedish National Diabetes Register
10 Liao et al An analysis of the content and clinical implications of online advertisements for female genital cosmetic surgery

 

Most read figures are based on pdf downloads and full text views. Abstract views are excluded.

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