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Most popular articles in September

25 Oct, 11 | by Richard Sands, Managing Editor

September’s most-accessed articles are topped by the article by Holden et al. on costs to the UK NHS of prescribing analogue insulin. This article prompted some strongly worded responses on our site, and you can read the responses here. The BBC, among others, also covered this research (view their report here).

Click on the titles to view the articles in full.

Authors Title
1. Holden et al. Evaluation of the incremental cost to the National Health Service of prescribing analogue insulin
2. Jutel et al. Self-diagnosis of influenza during a pandemic: a cross-sectional survey
3. Brett et al. A systematic mapping review of effective interventions for communicating with, supporting and providing information to parents of preterm infants
4. Apler Citalopram for major depressive disorder in adults: a systematic review and meta-analysis of published placebo-controlled trials
5. Bruno et al. A survey on self-assessed well-being in a cohort of chronic locked-in syndrome patients: happy majority, miserable minority
6. Engkilde et al. Association between cancer and contact allergy: a linkage study
7. Tugnoli et al. The NOTA study: non-operative treatment for acute appendicitis: prospective study on the efficacy and safety of antibiotic treatment (amoxicillin and clavulanic acid) in patients with right sided lower abdominal pain
8. Vaupel et al. Life expectancy and disparity: an international comparison of life table data
9. Smith-Rohrberg Maru et al. Implementing surgical services in a rural, resource-limited setting: a study protocol
10. Roberts et al. Population-based trends in pregnancy hypertension and pre-eclampsia: an international comparative study
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