What makes a systematic review “complex”?

  Originally published on BMJ Opinion Kamal R Mahtani, Tom Jefferson, and Carl Heneghan discuss:  What makes a systematic review “complex”? Systematic reviews involve systematically searching for all available evidence, appraising the quality of the included studies, and synthesising the evidence into a useable form. They contribute to the pool of best available evidence, translating […]

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A Word About Evidence: 3. Manifesto

  A manifesto for Evidence-Based Medicine (EBM) was published in the BMJ earlier this year and presented at Evidence Live. Jeff Aronson has been thinking again about the word manifesto. The Indo-European root MAN meant a hand. The Latin word was manus, from which we get words such as maintain, manacle, manage, manège, manicure, manipulate, […]

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Self-management of asthma – is there an app or pulse oximeter for that?

  While the app technology is developing at a fast pace, it seems the evidence is not keeping up to say how asthma patients might use these devices.  Annette Pluddemann 334 million people globally have asthma with 1 in 7 of the world’s children experiencing asthma symptoms that require lifelong management. Pulse oximeters are marketed […]

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Seven ways to ensure faster removal of harmful medicines

  Harmful medicines sometimes stay on the market for longer than they should. When that happens, people are unnecessarily exposed to medicines that may adversely affect their health. Igho Onakpoya The benefit-harm balance of new medicines is often not fully known at the time marketing licences are granted. More information about harms often becomes apparent […]

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Five reasons why diagnostic studies fail

  The number of studies assessing the diagnostic accuracy of tests is growing rapidly, but many studies fail to impact on practice due to five fundamental flaws in their methods. Jack O’Sullivan Diagnostic accuracy studies aim to determine how good a new test is at diagnosing a disease compared with a current test. To do this, […]

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Oxygen in heart attack: has practice caught up with the evidence?

  Use of oxygen in heart attack patients has remained uncertain for over 40 years, but clinical practice has only recently caught up with the evidence. Carl Heneghan My Oxford Handbook of Acute Medicine – getting rather old now, like me – states to give oxygen in the initial management of myocardial infarction. Oxygen was routine […]

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Rare adverse events in clinical trials: understanding the rule of three

  Investigators should report rare and very rare adverse events in clinical trials: Igho Onakpoya reports why it is important that all events are reported irrespective of their frequency.   Even though they may not give a signal in any single trial, a meta-analysis could reveal potentially important drug-adverse event associations that might require further […]

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EBM library: Systematic reviews to support humanitarian medicine

The EBM library signposts some essential reading for the practice of Evidence-Based Medicine. In this part of the library, we highlight the role of systematic reviews in humanitarian medicine. Kamal Mahtani Systematic reviews have made significant contributions to the pool of best available evidence in healthcare. In a previous post, I explored the importance of […]

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