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Archive for January 10th, 2011

Tony Falconer on leading healthier lives

10 Jan, 11 | by BMJ

tony_falconerThe coalition government seems keen to engage with individuals and organisations, to help them help themselves lead healthier lives. This, we are told, will be done through encouragement and collaboration as outlined in a paper by the Cabinet Office behavioural insights team at the end of last year. more…

Lesley Henderson: Cot death in EastEnders

10 Jan, 11 | by BMJ

lesley_henderson

The current cot death story in BBC soap opera EastEnders has generated numerous complaints to the BBC and regulatory body Ofcom. One of the actors involved is now reportedly leaving the programme after being traumatised by her harrowing scenes and being abused by a member of the public while out walking with her family. Yet sensitive social issues have been dealt with in the past in different soaps and EastEnders in particular is known for bringing gritty hard hitting storylines to pre-watershed audiences. Why has this particular story generated such controversy? more…

Liz Wager: Does the Wakefield et al case mean we should demand public access to raw data?

10 Jan, 11 | by BMJ

Liz WagerThe latest chapter in the sad saga of the Wakefield et al paper on the MMR vaccine raises some difficult questions about access to individual patient data. It is possible that the apparent discrepancies between the patient records and the publication might have come to light a whole lot sooner, perhaps even before publication, if Wakefield et al’s* raw data had been available for public scrutiny. (*I persist in including the rather cumbersome et al, because it is important to remember that there were co-authors, and I will return to this point later.) more…

Richard Lehman’s journal review, 10 January 2011

10 Jan, 11 | by BMJ

Richard Lehman

JAMA 5 Jan 2011 Vol 305
43 Implantable cardioverter-defibrillators are a good intervention for those who have bad systolic heart failure with a risk of ventricular arrhythmia, and would rather die slowly than suddenly. The “utility” of the device is that it can have a statistically significant effect on mortality in younger, properly selected patients; the “dysutility” includes everything that can go wrong with the machines and the possibility that dying from pump failure may be accompanied by multiple painful electric shocks. more…

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