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Widgets

“Publishing articles without making the data available is scientific malpractice”

24 May, 13 | by Claire Bower, Digital Comms Manager, @clairebower

This week has seen a flurry of activity on Twitter owing to a series of separate but related events highlighting trends in scholarly communication and research data. The fun kicked off with Wednesday’s ‘Now and Future of Data Publishing’ event organised by the Jisc Managing Research Data programme. It was followed on Thursday by the  ORCID Outreach Meeting, Getting Credit for Your Work: A Symposium on Research Attribution (jointly organised by Dryad and ORCID) and concludes with today’s Dryad Membership Meeting.

An obvious but important message that underpinned discussions on all three days was the importance of sharing data.  On the first morning, Simon Hodson of Jisc quoted Geoffrey Boulton of the Royal Society (who have made sharing data a condition of publication): “Publishing articles without making the data available is scientific malpractice.” This is an extreme but not uncommon view.

Trish Groves, deputy editor of the BMJ, recently wrote a summary of recent and future developments around sharing clinical data. The big news our end is that we now require authors of drug and devices trials to deposit their anonymised patient level data—on reasonable request. However, our interest in data publication started back in 2009 when we first incorporated data sharing statements into all BMJ research papers. More recently, we have encouraged our authors to deposit their data in Dryad and the first article to link through to a Dryad dataset was published by BMJ Open in 2011. We now have just under 40 papers with links to datasets on Dryad. more…

Widgets Galore

12 May, 10 | by Claire Bower, Digital Comms Manager, @clairebower

Welcome to the first post of the new BMJ Journals Web Development blog. This is the place to stay up-to-date with the goings-on of the journal websites and get to grips with our latest innovations.

The last few weeks have seen the implementation of two new widgets across our specialist journals. You may be wondering what on earth a widget is. Fear not, it’s likely that you’ve already seen widgets, and recognise them, even if you don’t know them by name. Ever seen a quiz or a game on a friend’s Facebook wall? A countdown to an event on a co-workers blog? These are all products of widget technology; simple and useful applications that can be embedded on a webpage, blog or social media profile.

Widgets are used at the bottom of our homepages to display the latest articles from each journal’s Online First, Current Issue and Most Frequently Read RSS feeds. If a journal has its own blog or podcasts, widgets are used to pull updates directly onto that journal’s homepage. They help to keep our sites looking fresh and up-to-date with minimal editorial input.

Most of the specialist websites now contain a doc2doc widget at the bottom of their homepage, which contains the latest discussions from the doc2doc online community and a BMJ Case Reports widget, which displays the latest Case Reports published in the BMJ Case Reports journal. Please feel free to share your thoughts on our use of widgets by leaving comments below.

Next week: Twitter accounts for every journal…


BMJ Journals Development blog homepage

BMJ Web Development Blog

Keep abreast of the technological developments being implemented on the BMJ journal websites.



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