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Social media during epidemics: a poisoned chalice?

5 Jan, 15 | by Claire Bower, Digital Comms Manager, @clairebower

Social networking is now the most popular online activity worldwide. Social networking sites account for nearly 1 in every 5 minutes spent online globally, reaching 82 percent of the world’s Internet population. As such, sites such as Facebook and Twitter have become an unavoidable part of crisis communication. However, opinion is mixed as to whether this pervasiveness is a blessing or a curse to organisations charged with protecting public health. The very attributes that make social media invaluable to communicators (instantaneous, wide-reaching) also make it incredibly difficult to control and moderate.

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One concern about social media is that it has the potential to generate and perpetuate rumour. Following the first diagnosis of an Ebola case in the United States on 30th Sep 2013, mentions of the virus on Twitter leapt from 100 per minute to more than 6,000. In Iowa, the Department of Public Health was forced to issue a statement dispelling social media rumours that Ebola had arrived in the state. Meanwhile, a steady stream of posts claiming that Ebola can be spread through air, water and food appeared; all of which are inaccurate.

Trying to stem the spread of incorrect information online shares many similarities with containing a virus in the real world. Internet users who have been given false messages from an inaccurate media report, another person on social media or word-of-mouth, proceed to “infect” others with each false tweet or Facebook post. “We have millions and millions of people on these social networks,” says Ceren Budak, a researcher who studies online communications at Microsoft Research. “Most of them in certain cases are not going to have reliable information, but they’re still going to keep talking.”

Part of the issue is thought to be the piecemeal way in which news is now consumed. According to a Pew Research Center study, almost a third of US adults get at least some of their news from Facebook, where recognised sources are competing with friends and relatives. Studies show that people are far more likely to trust information that comes from people they know than faceless organisations. This is how a single false statement on Twitter can affect thousands.

However, a report produced by the TELL ME project argues that “whilst on an open platform such as Twitter, users are free to post any message…the vast collaborative networks that comprise social media often question and correct rumours posted”.  Whilst there is more information online than ever before, users have learned to verify information and question where it is from. “Whilst the ‘citizen journalist’ can report on events ahead of reports by other media outlets or organisations, users are still wary of sources and, even on Twitter, hold official sources in high esteem, often seeking verification before believing alarmist messages”.

The Guardian did a great job of illustrating how one user’s tweet was retweeted several times during the Birmingham riots in England, August 2011, leading to a rapid spread of misinformation. Within half an hour the rumour of riots in a Birmingham children’s hospital spread through the simple process of people retweeting a dramatic and unfounded tweet. Despite this misinformation gaining momentum, within a period of two hours, the Twitter community was able to discredit the rumour. This demonstrates that users of social networks readily collaborate to make informed decisions on the quality of information they are receiving.

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Whether or not social media is seen as a force for good or evil during pandemics, it is a communication channel that those seeking to protect public health cannot ignore. Nor can organisations and individuals involved in crisis communication be reactive to messages shared and posted in this competitive environment. They must instead take a proactive stance in establishing an authoritative presence on social media channels before and during a crisis.

At the recent TELL ME conference, Alexander Talbott, a digital communications consultant specialising in healthcare, offered the following guidance on realising this objective:

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TELL ME (Transparent communication in Epidemics: Learning Lessons from experience, delivering effective Messages, providing Evidence) is a European Commission funded, collaborative project that has systematically reviewed existing evidence to develop practical guidance, online tools and models for improved risk and crisis communication during pandemics.

BMJ was the responsible partner for the report on New Social Media referenced above.

New twitter analytics: how many people see your tweets?

1 Sep, 14 | by Claire Bower, Digital Comms Manager, @clairebower

Back in July, Twitter launched an impressive analytics dashboard that was only accessible by advertisers and verified users. As of last week, however, this wealth of data became available to the public.

A bit like Google Analytics for tweets, this new toolkit allows you to gauge the performance of each and every tweet you send. Twitter users can identify in real time which tweets are getting the most attention and therefore determine the best strategies for reaching their audience.

To view your Tweet activity dashboard, visit analytics.twitter.com whilst logged into your account.

The first dashboard tab in Twitter analytics provides an overview of your tweets’ performance. You can find numbers for impressions, engagement, link clicks, retweets, favorites and replies. Twitter also offers measurement data for the previous 28 days so you can see how today’s performance compares to past performance.

Clicking on individual tweets also reveals more data, including the number of impressions over the past 24 hours, plus other valuable metrics like:

  • User profile clicks (clicks on name, @handle, or Twitter author profile photo
  • Retweets
  • Embedded media clicks (clicks to view a photo/video when applicable)
  • Detail expands (# of times a user clicked to view details of a tweet)
  • Favorites
  • Replies
  • Link clicks (clicks on URL or Twitter card)

As a bonus, all this data can be easily exported. The exported table data includes the full tweet text, the tweet permalinks, plus extra information like:

  • Timestamps
  • Hashtag clicks
  • App opens
  • Follows
  • Tweets emailed

In the next dashboard tab marked ‘Followers,’ marketers can track follower growth and extract important follower data.

You’ll see trends in your follower count displayed by a line chart and demographic data including:

  • # of followers in different locations
  • Your followers’ gender
  • Other accounts that your followers also follow
  • Your followers’ top interests
  • Your followers’ ‘unique’ interests

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So, what does all this mean? Social media measurement just got easier. Twitter analytics can’t fail to help marketers measure social media performance and therefore become more adept at matching Twitter activities to business goals.

What does it mean to be Social at Heart?

11 Jul, 14 | by Claire Bower, Digital Comms Manager, @clairebower

Last week I attended the IAB annual social media event; ‘Social at Heart’. Here’s a round up of key messages presented by an impressive group of speakers, including representatives from BuzzFeed, Twitter, Google and UNICEF.

IAB Social at Heart Event


Social & Content
Will Hayward, Vice President, Advertising at BuzzFeed

  • BuzzFeed receives 75% of visits from social platforms and 50% from mobile
  • It’s better to target small niche groups of people than a broad audience – they are much more likely to share your content with their peers
  • Sharing is the new system of distribution and brands must think about how and why content spreads
  • Memes = Participatory Mass Media
  • “Start with the consumer, do something special” – what are we actually offering consumers that will interest them?
  • Creating content that is relevant will always succeed
  • Do not be the person at the party that only talks about themselves
  • Ensure you’re engaging with your audience on their terms in an environment that is right for them

Social & Social 
Paul Guerrieria, Digital Planner, Google & Will Scougal, Brand Strategy & Creative, Twitter 

  • Google+ is not just a social platform but a social layer that integrates all Google products
  • Hashtags are now searchable on Google
  • Google+ content from brands is pulled onto the Search Engine Results Page for free but there are also links out to relevant hashtags on Twitter and Facebook 
  • Plan for the moment –> Enhance in the stream –> Keep it simple
  • Be proactive around key events but also reactive to events as they happen

Social & Good
Laila Takeh, Digital Strategist and Leader, Unicef 

  • 479,050 tweets and £5.3m raised during Soccer Aid 2014
  • For UNICEF, social = content + influencers + paid media
  • Twitter cards were the most successful engagement trigger in paid social during Soccer Aid
  • Real-time Google Analytics gave team up to date view of what was and wasn’t working – enabled them to be as fluid and responsive as possible
  • UNICEF encourages its employees to tweet in a personal capacity

Social & Devices
Alex Kozloff, Head of Mobile, IAB UK 

  • 19% of the top 50 UK retailers with a mobile site
    have built one that is not transactional 
  • Q4 2013 – 53% of Facebook revenue comes from mobile
  • 4% of the top 50 UK retailers don’t have a transactional PC website
  • 19% of the top the top 50 UK retailers with a mobile site, have built one that is NOT transactional
  • 52% of the top 50 UK retailers with a mobile app, have built one that is NOT transactional

Social & Video
Oliver Smith, Managing Director, EMEA at Unruly

  • Celebrities do not drive online ad sharing
  • No creative device drives sharing more than any other, with the exception of personal triump. Focus on emotions, not creative devices
  • Poorly branding your ad is like throwing away your marketing budget. The average branded video takes 30 seconds to reveal the brand. There is no correlation between level of branding and shareability
  • Pack an emotional punch – videos that elicit a strong emotional response are twice as likely to be shared

What does the social media landscape look like in China?

28 Apr, 14 | by Claire Bower, Digital Comms Manager, @clairebower

Contrary to popular belief, limited access to certain Western websites has done little to harm the development of social media in China. In fact, it is reported that 91% of Chinese internet users have a social media account, compared to 67 per cent in the US. Given that China has become the world’s second largest economy, how can businesses use social media channels to reach its huge consumer base? more…

What value can social media add to conferences?

14 Apr, 14 | by Claire Bower, Digital Comms Manager, @clairebower

Attending the IOC World Conference for Prevention of Injury and Illness in Sport in Monaco last week got me thinking about the value social media adds to such events. Apparently, 84% of organisers use Facebook to promote their events, while 61% use Twitter and 42% use YouTube. It seems that social media not only facilitates knowledge sharing and networking amongst attendees, it can also help create a real buzz that starts before the event and continues long after it ends.

more…

Docphin: a “Bloomberg for Doctors”?

28 Feb, 14 | by Claire Bower, Digital Comms Manager, @clairebower

This time last year I reviewed Browzine, an app that lets its users browse, sort and save scholarly and peer-reviewed articles on the go. Docphin (the Personalized Health Information Network) is of a similar ilk but with a few key differences; not least its focus on medical journals. Founded by a group of physicians in 2010, Docphin seeks to address the need of medical professionals to keep up-to-date with medical literature in an easily accessible format.  By the end of 2013, it was being used by over 350 institutions in 15 countries.

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How to reach your audience at the right time on multiple networks

6 Feb, 14 | by Claire Bower, Digital Comms Manager, @clairebower

Twitter generated an entire ecosystem of social networking apps, each striving to make using multiple social networks, posting everywhere and sharing longer posts, easier. Twitter then started cracking down on how third party apps could use its API and most of us moved back to using each network individually. However, there are still a few apps out there that can make social networking easier and more productive. One of the best is Buffer.

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“News = mobile. Mobile = Facebook”? The rise of social sharing news sites

16 Dec, 13 | by Claire Bower, Digital Comms Manager, @clairebower

In a previous post, I discussed the increasing importance of social media optimisation (SMO) at the expense of traditional SEO methods. This week, I’ll be looking at how traditional publishers are testing this theory with product launches that rely almost entirely on consumer behaviour on Twitter and Facebook.

Buzzfeed, a website that combines a platform for detecting viral content with an editorial process to provide a snapshot of “the viral web in realtime”, revealed that it had reached a record high of 130 million global unique users last month.

The company  credited a lot of the growth to an increase in traffic coming from Facebook. However, Twitter referral traffic has also surged, with 180% growth in the past year. The seven-year-old site is experiencing breakneck growth, with global unique user numbers up 350% year-on-year.

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The link between social and business objectives

6 Dec, 13 | by BMJ

A key theme of the Corporate Social Media Summit (#csmeu) was how social media can help businesses achieve their strategic objectives.

Ian Robin, Director of Strategic Accounts EMEA at Hootsuite said that much of the confusion around linking the two can be traced back to how social media was originally adopted by organisations, usually in a ‘cottage industry’ fashion by individual departments who wanted to create awareness around a campaign. This approach worked to an extent but created variation across companies and without a clear vision of how social can be used in a strategically meaningful way.

To help unravel the confusion, some speakers at #csmeu gave best practice examples as to how approaches to social media have been tied back to clear business goals. Royal Mail uses Twitter to engage directly with and reply to customer complaints or queries. Martha Roberts, Head of Customer Support, explained that not only does this service help solve customers’ problems but also presents the opportunity to develop a rapport between staff and customers. Staff are given the freedom to use a personable tone of voice and this gives the company the opportunity to shine: not only is it a customer service exercise but also a great PR opportunity. As you can see from the photo below this approach has instilled improved consumer confidence. One of Royal Mail’s priorities is to be customer-focused and through this example you can trace it clearly back to what they’re all about.

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Why image is everything on social media

29 Nov, 13 | by Claire Bower, Digital Comms Manager, @clairebower

Social media marketing has evolved significantly over the past few years and keeping up with current trends can be crucial for success. One of the biggest changes we’ve seen is the shift towards image-centric marketing rather than traditional text.

According to Trend Reports, between 65 and 85 percent of people describe themselves as visual learners, which means that they digest information more easily by viewing an image than reading text. It’s hardly surprising, then, that image-based social networks such as Pinterest and Instagram are enjoying such high levels of user activity. Even academic journals, such as eLife and PeerJ, are opting for big photos and a clean, navigable design. Not to be left behind, more established social networks are now adapting their designs to meet these changing user needs.

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